Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret

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Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret
Title Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret
Author
Publisher The New Press
Release DateNovember 17, 2020
Category Law
Total Pages 256 pages
ISBN 1620976080
Book Rating 4.6 out of 5 from 9 reviews
Language EN, ES, BE, DA ,DE , NL and FR
Book Review & Summary:

The MacArthur grant–winning “Erin Brockovich of Sewage” tells the riveting story of the environmental justice movement that is firing up rural America, with a foreword by the renowned author of Just Mercy MacArthur “genius” Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Lowndes County, Alabama, a place that's been called “Bloody Lowndes” because of its violent, racist history. Once the epicenter of the voting rights struggle, today it's Ground Zero for a new movement that is Flowers's life's work. It's a fight to ensure human dignity through a right most Americans take for granted: basic sanitation. Too many people, especially the rural poor, lack an affordable means of disposing cleanly of the waste from their toilets, and, as a consequence, live amid filth. Flowers calls this America's dirty secret. In this powerful book she tells the story of systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that foster Third World conditions, not just in Alabama, but across America, in Appalachia, Central California, coastal Florida, Alaska, the urban Midwest, and on Native American reservations in the West. Flowers's book is the inspiring story of the evolution of an activist, from country girl to student civil rights organizer to environmental justice champion at Bryan Stevenson's Equal Justice Initiative. It shows how sanitation is becoming too big a problem to ignore as climate change brings sewage to more backyards, and not only those of poor minorities.

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Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers

Title Waste
Author Catherine Coleman Flowers
Publisher The New Press
Release Date 2020-11-17
Category Social Science
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9781620976098
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A Smithsonian Magazine Top Ten Best Science Book of 2020 The MacArthur grant–winning “Erin Brockovich of Sewage” tells the riveting story of the environmental justice movement that is firing up rural America, with a foreword by the renowned author of Just Mercy MacArthur “genius” Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Lowndes County, Alabama, a place that's been called “Bloody Lowndes” because of its violent, racist history. Once the epicenter of the voting rights struggle, today it's Ground Zero for a new movement that is Flowers's life's work. It's a fight to ensure human dignity through a right most Americans take for granted: basic sanitation. Too many people, especially the rural poor, lack an affordable means of disposing cleanly of the waste from their toilets, and, as a consequence, live amid filth. Flowers calls this America's dirty secret. In this powerful book she tells the story of systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that foster Third World conditions, not just in Alabama, but across America, in Appalachia, Central California, coastal Florida, Alaska, the urban Midwest, and on Native American reservations in the West. Flowers's book is the inspiring story of the evolution of an activist, from country girl to student civil rights organizer to environmental justice champion at Bryan Stevenson's Equal Justice Initiative. It shows how sanitation is becoming too big a problem to ignore as climate change brings sewage to more backyards, and not only those of poor minorities.

Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers

Title Waste
Author Catherine Coleman Flowers
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020-11-17
Category Political Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1620976080
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

The "Erin Brockovich of Sewage" tells the riveting story of the environmental justice movement that is firing up rural America, with a foreword by the renowned author of Just Mercy "Catherine [Flowers] is a shining example of the power individuals have to make a measurable difference by educating, advocating, and acting on environmental issues . . . [and a] firm advocate for the poor, who recognizes that the climate crisis disproportionately affects the least wealthy and powerful among us." --Al Gore Catherine Flowers grew up in Lowndes County, Alabama, a place that's been called "Bloody Lowndes" because of its violent, racist history. Once the epicenter of the voting rights struggle, today it's Ground Zero for a new movement that is Flowers's life's work. It's a fight to ensure human dignity through a right most Americans take for granted: basic sanitation. Too many people, especially the rural poor, lack an affordable means of disposing cleanly of the waste from their toilets, and, as a consequence, live amid filth. Flowers calls this America's dirty secret. In this powerful book she tells the story of systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that foster Third World conditions, not just in Alabama, but across America, in Appalachia, Central California, coastal Florida, Alaska, the urban Midwest, and on Native American reservations in the West. Worsened by climate change, poor sanitation threatens to bring new public health crises; already, the tropical parasite hookworm, long eradicated in the South, is back. Yet policymakers on all levels have mostly failed to act. Flowers aims to change that. Flowers's book is the inspiring story of the evolution of an activist, from country girl to student civil rights organizer to environmental justice champion at Bryan Stevenson's Equal Justice Initiative on a world stage. It shows how sanitation is becoming too big a problem to ignore as climate change brings sewage to more backyards, and not only those of poor minorities.

Title Reconnecting Culture Technology and Nature
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In this exciting new book, Mike Michael uses case studies of mundane technologies such as the walking boot, the car and the TV remote control to question some of the fundamental dichotomies through which we make sense of the world. Drawing on the insights of Bruno Latour, Donna Haraway and Michel Serres, the author elaborates an innovative methodology through which new hybrid objects of study are creatively constructed, tracing the ways in which the cultural, the natural and the technological interweave in the production of order and disorder. This book critically engages with and draws connections between a wide range of literature including those concerned with the environment, consumption and the body.

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ISBN 9781595585721
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“A galvanizing exposé” of America’s trash problem from plastic in the ocean to “wasteful packaging, bogus recycling, and flawed landfills and incinerators” (Booklist, starred review). Eat a take-out meal, buy a pair of shoes, or read a newspaper, and you’re soon faced with a bewildering amount of garbage. The United States is the planet’s number-one producer of trash. Each American throws out 4.5 pounds daily. But garbage is also a global problem. Today, the Pacific Ocean contains six times more plastic waste than zooplankton. How did we end up with this much rubbish, and where does it all go? Journalist and filmmaker Heather Rogers answers these questions by taking readers on a grisly and fascinating tour through the underworld of garbage. Gone Tomorrow excavates the history of rubbish handling from the nineteenth century to the present, pinpointing the roots of today’s waste-addicted society. With a “lively authorial voice,” Rogers draws connections between modern industrial production, consumer culture, and our throwaway lifestyle (New York Press). She also investigates the politics of recycling and the export of trash to poor countries, while offering a potent argument for change. “A clear-thinking and peppery writer, Rogers presents a galvanizing exposé of how we became the planet’s trash monsters. . . . [Gone Tomorrow] details everything that is wrong with today’s wasteful packaging, bogus recycling, and flawed landfills and incinerators. . . . Rogers exhibits black-belt precision.” —Booklist, starred review

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An examination of the role that inequality plays in shaping post-Kyoto prospects for a North-South global climate pact; with statistical and theoretical analysis and case studies of recent climate-related disasters.

Title A People s History of the United States
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In this Second Edition of this radical social history of America from Columbus to the present, Howard Zinn includes substantial coverage of the Carter, Reagan and Bush years and an Afterword on the Clinton presidency. Its commitment and vigorous style mean it will be compelling reading for under-graduate and post-graduate students and scholars in American social history and American studies, as well as the general reader.

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An interdisciplinary study that combines the burgeoning fields of digital aesthetics and eco-criticism. The book offers the argument that digital art in the service of environmental criticism has the potential to reconnect humankind to the natural world.

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Roscommon was a land hungry county. The landless rose in large numbers and declared they would rather be shot than starved. Their opposition and brutality was directed against those evicting their tenants or ëtaking-upí land from which another had been evicted. By depleting the ranks of the landless labourers, the famine eased the pressure on the land supply and broke the resolve of the ëdisaffectedí.

Title Civil Wars Civil Beings and Civil Rights in Alabama s Black Belt
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Book Summary:

How the 1863 elections in Perry County changed the course of Alabama's role in the Civil War In his fascinating, in-depth study, Bertis D. English analyzes why Perry county, situated in the heart of a violence-prone subregion, enjoyed more peaceful race relations and less bloodshed than several neighboring counties. Choosing an atypical locality as central to his study, English raises questions about factors affecting ethnic disturbances in the Black Belt and elsewhere in Alabama. He also uses Perry County, which he deems an anomalous county, to caution against the tendency of some scholars to make sweeping generalizations about entire regions and subregions. English contends Perry County was a relatively tranquil place with a set of extremely influential African American businessmen, clergy, politicians, and other leaders during Reconstruction. Together with egalitarian or opportunistic white citizens, they headed a successful campaign for black agency and biracial cooperation that few counties in Alabama matched. English also illustrates how a significant number of educational institutions, a high density of African American residents, and an unusually organized and informed African American population were essential factors in forming Perry's character. He likewise traces the development of religion in Perry, the nineteenth-century Baptist capital of Alabama, and the emergence of civil rights in Perry, an underemphasized center of activism during the twentieth century. This well-researched and comprehensive volume illuminates Perry County's history from the various perspectives of its black, interracial, and white inhabitants, amplifying their own voices in a novel way. The narrative includes rich personal details about ordinary and affluent people, both free and unfree, creating a distinctive resource that will be useful to scholars as well as a reference that will serve the needs of students and general readers.

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The mature dynasty is as much the sum of complex interests in the culture and production of wealth as it is the story of the prominent family at its origins. This volume examines the full range of interests in the perpetuation of a dynasty and provides a clearer picture of the long-term cultural legacies of such capitalist clans. Ultimately, Marcus and Hall address the question of what makes diversely involved and situated descendants adhere to their ancestral code of family authority, and their answers are fully informed by an understanding of the more complex organization of dynastic culture and wealth. A family story in itself cannot encompass the workings of a mature fortune, because the power and roles of descendants are so often subordinated to the institutional legacies and myths of celebrity that engulf them.

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A richly informed and inspired description of our evolution from Australopithecus to the Homo Sapiens we are today.

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Book Summary:

From St. Louis to New Orleans, from Baltimore to Oklahoma City, there are poor and minority neighborhoods so beset by pollution that just living in them can be hazardous to your health. Due to entrenched segregation, zoning ordinances that privilege wealthier communities, or because businesses have found the OCypaths of least resistance, OCO there are many hazardous waste and toxic facilities in these communities, leading residents to experience health and wellness problems on top of the race and class discrimination most already experience. Taking stock of the recent environmental justice scholarship, a Toxic Communities aexamines the connections among residential segregation, zoning, and exposure to environmental hazards. Renowned environmental sociologist Dorceta Taylor focuses on the locations of hazardous facilities in low-income and minority communities and shows how they have been dumped on, contaminated and exposed. Drawing on an array of historical and contemporary case studies from across the country, Taylor explores controversies over racially-motivated decisions in zoning laws, eminent domain, government regulation (or lack thereof), and urban renewal. She provides a comprehensive overview of the debate over whether or not there is a link between environmental transgressions and discrimination, drawing a clear picture of the state of the environmental justice field today and where it is going. In doing so, she introduces new concepts and theories for understanding environmental racism that will be essential for environmental justice scholars. A fascinating landmark study, a Toxic Communities agreatly contributes to the study of race, the environment, and space in the contemporary United States."

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Author Benjamin Lorr
Publisher Penguin
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Category Social Science
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ISBN 9780553459401
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the tradition of Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore's Dilemma, an extraordinary investigation into the human lives at the heart of the American grocery store What does it take to run the American supermarket? How do products get to shelves? Who sets the price? And who suffers the consequences of increased convenience end efficiency? In this alarming exposé, author Benjamin Lorr pulls back the curtain on this highly secretive industry. Combining deep sourcing, immersive reporting, and compulsively readable prose, Lorr leads a wild investigation in which we learn: • The secrets of Trader Joe’s success from Trader Joe himself • Why truckers call their job “sharecropping on wheels” • What it takes for a product to earn certification labels like “organic” and “fair trade” • The struggles entrepreneurs face as they fight for shelf space, including essential tips, tricks, and traps for any new food business • The truth behind the alarming slave trade in the shrimp industry The result is a page-turning portrait of an industry in flux, filled with the passion, ingenuity, and exploitation required to make this everyday miracle continue to function. The product of five years of research and hundreds of interviews across every level of the industry, The Secret Life of Groceries delivers powerful social commentary on the inherently American quest for more and the social costs therein.

Trace by Lauret Savoy

Title Trace
Author Lauret Savoy
Publisher Catapult
Release Date 2015-11-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 240
ISBN 9781619026681
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Through personal journeys and historical inquiry, this PEN Literary Award finalist explores how America’s still unfolding history and ideas of “race” have marked its people and the land. Sand and stone are Earth’s fragmented memory. Each of us, too, is a landscape inscribed by memory and loss. One life–defining lesson Lauret Savoy learned as a young girl was this: the American land did not hate. As an educator and Earth historian, she has tracked the continent’s past from the relics of deep time; but the paths of ancestors toward her—paths of free and enslaved Africans, colonists from Europe, and peoples indigenous to this land—lie largely eroded and lost. A provocative and powerful mosaic that ranges across a continent and across time, from twisted terrain within the San Andreas Fault zone to a South Carolina plantation, from national parks to burial grounds, from “Indian Territory” and the U.S.–Mexico Border to the U.S. capital, Trace grapples with a searing national history to reveal the often unvoiced presence of the past. In distinctive and illuminating prose that is attentive to the rhythms of language and landscapes, she weaves together human stories of migration, silence, and displacement, as epic as the continent they survey, with uplifted mountains, braided streams, and eroded canyons. Gifted with this manifold vision, and graced by a scientific and lyrical diligence, she delves through fragmented histories—natural, personal, cultural—to find shadowy outlines of other stories of place in America. "Every landscape is an accumulation,"" reads one epigraph. ""Life must be lived amidst that which was made before." Courageously and masterfully, Lauret Savoy does so in this beautiful book: she lives there, making sense of this land and its troubled past, reconciling what it means to inhabit terrains of memory—and to be one.

Recurring Great Lakes Crisis by Jean-Pierre Chretien

Title Recurring Great Lakes Crisis
Author Jean-Pierre Chretien
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 2009-06-22
Category Political Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 0199326312
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Since the early 1990s, the African Great Lakes region has experienced a series of traumas that have profoundly disrupted its geopolitical, economic, social, and demographic stability. Despite numerous peace accords, political compromises, and international interventions, the region has yet to eliminate the tensions that regularly flare up into hate and violence. Featuring contributions from historians, sociologists, anthropologists, and political scientists, this collection accounts for the omnipresent "metasteses of hatred and violence" that plague the Great Lakes Region. Through a series of detailed case studies, contributors outline the genealogy and historicity of violence in the region while remaining sensitive to the singular, contingent experiences of each country.

Odyssey by Homer

Title Odyssey
Author Homer
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1891
Category
Total Pages 186
ISBN HARVARD:HW21W0
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title The Wrong Complexion for Protection
Author Robert D. Bullard
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2012-07-23
Category Social Science
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780814771938
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

When the images of desperate, hungry, thirsty, sick, mostly black people circulated in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, it became apparent to the whole country that race did indeed matter when it came to government assistance. In The Wrong Complexion for Protection, Robert D. Bullard and Beverly Wright place the government response to natural and human-induced disasters in historical context over the past eight decades. They compare and contrast how the government responded to emergencies, including environmental and public health emergencies, toxic contamination, industrial accidents, bioterrorism threats and show that African Americans are disproportionately affected. Bullard and Wright argue that uncovering and eliminating disparate disaster response can mean the difference between life and death for those most vulnerable in disastrous times.

Trick Baby by Iceberg Slim

Title Trick Baby
Author Iceberg Slim
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2011-09-13
Category Fiction
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9781936399031
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The author that brought black literature to the streets is back. Weaving stories of deceit, sex, humor and race Iceberg Slim, best-selling author of Pimp, brings us the story of a hustler who doesn’t just play the con game, he transforms it. This is the gritty truth, the life of a hustler in south side Chicago where the only characters are those who con and those who get conned. Trick Baby tells the story of “White Folks,” a blue-eyed, light-haired, con-artist whose pale skin allows him to pass in the streets as a white man. Folks is tormented early in life, rejected by other children and branded a “Trick Baby,” the child conceived between a hooker and her trick. Refusing to abandon his life in the ghetto and a chance at revenge, Folks is taken under the wing of an older mentor, Blue. What happens next is not to be believed. Only Slim could bring us the story of a hustler, forced to learn the game and rise to the top. It’s Slim’s story and he tells it in the only way he knows how, in the language of the streets.

No Place To Go by Lezlie Lowe

Title No Place To Go
Author Lezlie Lowe
Publisher Coach House Books
Release Date 2018-09-11
Category Social Science
Total Pages 186
ISBN 9781770565616
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Adults don't talk about the business of doing our business. We work on one assumption: the world of public bathrooms is problem- and politics-free. No Place To Go: Answering the Call of Nature in the Urban Jungle reveals the opposite is true. No Place To Go is a toilet tour from London to San Francisco to Toronto and beyond. From pay potties to deserted alleyways, No Place To Go is a marriage of urbanism, social narrative, and pop culture that shows the ways — momentous and mockable — public bathrooms just don't work. Like, for the homeless, who, faced with no place to go sometimes literally take to the streets. (Ever heard of a municipal poop map?) For people with invisible disabilities, such as Crohn’s disease, who stay home rather than risk soiling themselves on public transit routes. For girls who quit sports teams because they don’t want to run to the edge of the pitch to pee. Celebrities like Lady Gaga and Bruce Springsteen have protested bathroom bills that will stomp on the rights of transpeople. And where was Hillary Clinton after she arrived back to the stage late after the first commercial break of the live-televised Democratic leadership debate in December 2015? Stuck in a queue for the women’s bathroom. Peel back the layers on public bathrooms and it’s clear many more people want for good access than have it. Public bathroom access is about cities, society, design, movement, and equity. The real question is: Why are public toilets so crappy?

The Secret World by Christopher Andrew

Title The Secret World
Author Christopher Andrew
Publisher Penguin UK
Release Date 2018-06-28
Category Political Science
Total Pages 960
ISBN 9780241305225
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

'The most comprehensive narrative of intelligence compiled ... unrivalled' Max Hastings, Sunday Times 'Captivating, insightful and masterly' Edward Lucas, The Times The history of espionage is far older than any of today's intelligence agencies, yet the long history of intelligence operations has been largely forgotten. The first mention of espionage in world literature is in the Book of Exodus.'God sent out spies into the land of Canaan'. From there, Christopher Andrew traces the shift in the ancient world from divination to what we would recognize as attempts to gather real intelligence in the conduct of military operations, and considers how far ahead of the West - at that time - China and India were. He charts the development of intelligence and security operations and capacity through, amongst others, Renaissance Venice, Elizabethan England, Revolutionary America, Napoleonic France, right up to sophisticated modern activities of which he is the world's best-informed interpreter. What difference have security and intelligence operations made to course of history? Why have they so often forgotten by later practitioners? This fascinating book provides the answers.

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