Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret

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Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret
Title Waste: One Woman’s Fight Against America’s Dirty Secret
Author
Publisher The New Press
Release DateNovember 17, 2020
Category Law
Total Pages 256 pages
ISBN 1620976080
Book Rating 4.6 out of 5 from 9 reviews
Language EN, ES, BE, DA ,DE , NL and FR
Book Review & Summary:

The MacArthur grant–winning “Erin Brockovich of Sewage” tells the riveting story of the environmental justice movement that is firing up rural America, with a foreword by the renowned author of Just Mercy MacArthur “genius” Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Lowndes County, Alabama, a place that's been called “Bloody Lowndes” because of its violent, racist history. Once the epicenter of the voting rights struggle, today it's Ground Zero for a new movement that is Flowers's life's work. It's a fight to ensure human dignity through a right most Americans take for granted: basic sanitation. Too many people, especially the rural poor, lack an affordable means of disposing cleanly of the waste from their toilets, and, as a consequence, live amid filth. Flowers calls this America's dirty secret. In this powerful book she tells the story of systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that foster Third World conditions, not just in Alabama, but across America, in Appalachia, Central California, coastal Florida, Alaska, the urban Midwest, and on Native American reservations in the West. Flowers's book is the inspiring story of the evolution of an activist, from country girl to student civil rights organizer to environmental justice champion at Bryan Stevenson's Equal Justice Initiative. It shows how sanitation is becoming too big a problem to ignore as climate change brings sewage to more backyards, and not only those of poor minorities.

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Waste by Catherine Coleman Flowers

Title Waste
Author Catherine Coleman Flowers
Publisher The New Press
Release Date 2020-11-17
Category Social Science
Total Pages 186
ISBN 9781620976098
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The “Erin Brockovich of Sewage” tells the riveting story of the environmental justice movement that is firing up rural America, with a foreword by the renowned author of Just Mercy Catherine Coleman Flowers grew up in Lowndes County, Alabama, a place that’s been called “Bloody Lowndes” because of its violent, racist history. Once the epicenter of the voting rights struggle, today it’s Ground Zero for a new movement that is Flowers’s life’s work. It’s a fight to ensure human dignity through a right most Americans take for granted: basic sanitation. Too many people, especially the rural poor, lack an affordable means of disposing cleanly of the waste from their toilets, and, as a consequence, live amid filth. Flowers calls this America’s dirty secret. In this powerful book she tells the story of systemic class, racial, and geographic prejudice that foster Third World conditions, not just in Alabama, but across America, in Appalachia, Central California, coastal Florida, Alaska, the urban Midwest, and on Native American reservations in the West. Flowers’s book is the inspiring story of the evolution of an activist, from country girl to student civil rights organizer to environmental justice champion at Bryan Stevenson’s Equal Justice Initiative. It shows how sanitation is becoming too big a problem to ignore as climate change brings sewage to more backyards, and not only those of poor minorities.

Superman S Not Coming by Erin Brockovich

Title Superman s Not Coming
Author Erin Brockovich
Publisher Pantheon
Release Date 2020
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781524746964
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From environmental activist, consumer advocate, renowned crusader, champion fighter-maverick, whose courageous case against Pacific Gas and Electric was dramatized in the Oscar-winning film--a book to inspire change that looks at our present situation with water and reveals the imminent threats to our most precious, essential element, and shows us how we can each take action to make changes in our cities, our towns, our villages, before it is too late. In Erin Brockovich's long-awaited book--her first to reckon with conditions on our planet--she makes clear why we are in the trouble we're in, and how, in large and practical ways, we each can take actions to bring about change. She shows us what's at stake, and writes of the fraudulent science that disguises these issues, along with cancer clusters not being reported. She writes of the saga of PG&E that continues to this day, and of the communities and people she has worked with who have helped to make an impact. She writes of the water operator in Poughkeepsie, New York, who responded to his customers' concerns and changed his system to create some of the safest water in the country; of the moms in Hannibal, Missouri, who became the first citizens in the nation to file an ordinance prohibiting the use of ammonia in their public drinking water; and about how we can protect our right to clean water by fighting for better enforcement of the laws, new legislation, and better regulations. She cannot fight all battles for all people and gives us the tools to take actions ourselves, have our voices be heard, and know that steps are being taken to make sure our water is safe to drink and use.

Waste by Kate O'Neill

Title Waste
Author Kate O'Neill
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Release Date 2019-09-04
Category Science
Total Pages 240
ISBN 9780745687438
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Waste is one of the planet’s last great resource frontiers. From furniture made from up-cycled wood to gold extracted from computer circuit boards, artisans and multinational corporations alike are finding ways to profit from waste while diverting materials from overcrowded landfills. Yet beyond these benefits, this “new” resource still poses serious risks to human health and the environment. In this unique book, Kate O’Neill traces the emergence of the global political economy of wastes over the past two decades. She explains how the emergence of waste governance initiatives and mechanisms can help us deal with both the risks and the opportunities associated with the hundreds of millions – possibly billions – of tons of waste we generate each year. Drawing on a range of fascinating case studies to develop her arguments, including China’s role as the primary recipient of recyclable plastics and scrap paper from the Western world, “Zero-Waste” initiatives, the emergence of transnational waste-pickers’ alliances, and alternatives for managing growing volumes of electronic and food wastes, O’Neill shows how waste can be a risk, a resource, and even a livelihood, with implications for governance at local, national, and global levels.

Sex Tourism In Bahia by Erica Lorraine Williams

Title Sex Tourism in Bahia
Author Erica Lorraine Williams
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 2013-10-30
Category Social Science
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9780252095191
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For nearly a decade, Brazil has surpassed Thailand as the world's premier sex tourism destination. As the first full-length ethnography of sex tourism in Brazil, this pioneering study treats sex tourism as a complex and multidimensional phenomenon that involves a range of activities and erotic connections, from sex work to romantic transnational relationships. Erica Lorraine Williams explores sex tourism in the Brazilian state of Bahia from the perspectives of foreign tourists, tourism industry workers, sex workers who engage in liaisons with foreigners, and Afro-Brazilian men and women who contend with foreigners' stereotypical assumptions about their licentiousness. She shows how the Bahian state strategically exploits the touristic desire for exotic culture by appropriating an eroticized blackness and commodifying the Afro-Brazilian culture in order to sell Bahia to foreign travelers.

Shout Your Abortion by Amelia Bonow

Title Shout Your Abortion
Author Amelia Bonow
Publisher PM Press
Release Date 2018-11-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781629635903
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Following the U.S. Congress's attempts to defund Planned Parenthood, the hashtag #ShoutYourAbortion became a viral conduit for abortion storytelling, receiving extensive media coverage and positioning real human experiences at the center of America's abortion debate for the very first time. This online momentum quickly launched a grassroots movement, inspiring countless individuals to share their stories in art, media, and community events and to create spaces for others to do the same. Shout Your Abortion is a collection of photos, essays, and creative work inspired by the movement of the same name, a template for building new communities of healing, and a call to action. Since the movement's inception, people have shared stories and begun building community around these conversations in a range of ways: making art, hosting comedy shows, creating abortion-positive clothing, altering billboards, making zines, and hosting "thank you" letter-writing parties for their local abortion providers. This book sheds light on the individuals who have breathed life into this movement, illustrating the profound liberatory and political power of defying shame and claiming sole authorship of our experiences.

Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson

Title Speak
Author Laurie Halse Anderson
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux (BYR)
Release Date 2011-05-10
Category Young Adult Fiction
Total Pages 208
ISBN 1429997044
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The first ten lies they tell you in high school. "Speak up for yourself--we want to know what you have to say." From the first moment of her freshman year at Merryweather High, Melinda knows this is a big fat lie, part of the nonsense of high school. She is friendless, outcast, because she busted an end-of-summer party by calling the cops, so now nobody will talk to her, let alone listen to her. As time passes, she becomes increasingly isolated and practically stops talking altogether. Only her art class offers any solace, and it is through her work on an art project that she is finally able to face what really happened at that terrible party: she was raped by an upperclassman, a guy who still attends Merryweather and is still a threat to her. Her healing process has just begun when she has another violent encounter with him. But this time Melinda fights back, refuses to be silent, and thereby achieves a measure of vindication. In Laurie Halse Anderson's powerful novel, an utterly believable heroine with a bitterly ironic voice delivers a blow to the hypocritical world of high school. She speaks for many a disenfranchised teenager while demonstrating the importance of speaking up for oneself. Speak was a 1999 National Book Award Finalist for Young People's Literature.

Title The American Spectator
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1992
Category American literature
Total Pages 186
ISBN UVA:X002510002
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

White Trash by Nancy Isenberg

Title White Trash
Author Nancy Isenberg
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2016-06-21
Category History
Total Pages 496
ISBN 9781101608487
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The New York Times bestseller A New York Times Notable and Critics’ Top Book of 2016 Longlisted for the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Nonfiction One of NPR's 10 Best Books Of 2016 Faced Tough Topics Head On NPR's Book Concierge Guide To 2016’s Great Reads San Francisco Chronicle's Best of 2016: 100 recommended books A Washington Post Notable Nonfiction Book of 2016 Globe & Mail 100 Best of 2016 “Formidable and truth-dealing . . . necessary.” —The New York Times “This eye-opening investigation into our country’s entrenched social hierarchy is acutely relevant.” —O Magazine In her groundbreaking bestselling history of the class system in America, Nancy Isenberg upends history as we know it by taking on our comforting myths about equality and uncovering the crucial legacy of the ever-present, always embarrassing—if occasionally entertaining—poor white trash. “When you turn an election into a three-ring circus, there’s always a chance that the dancing bear will win,” says Isenberg of the political climate surrounding Sarah Palin. And we recognize how right she is today. Yet the voters who boosted Trump all the way to the White House have been a permanent part of our American fabric, argues Isenberg. The wretched and landless poor have existed from the time of the earliest British colonial settlement to today's hillbillies. They were alternately known as “waste people,” “offals,” “rubbish,” “lazy lubbers,” and “crackers.” By the 1850s, the downtrodden included so-called “clay eaters” and “sandhillers,” known for prematurely aged children distinguished by their yellowish skin, ragged clothing, and listless minds. Surveying political rhetoric and policy, popular literature and scientific theories over four hundred years, Isenberg upends assumptions about America’s supposedly class-free society––where liberty and hard work were meant to ensure real social mobility. Poor whites were central to the rise of the Republican Party in the early nineteenth century, and the Civil War itself was fought over class issues nearly as much as it was fought over slavery. Reconstruction pitted poor white trash against newly freed slaves, which factored in the rise of eugenics–-a widely popular movement embraced by Theodore Roosevelt that targeted poor whites for sterilization. These poor were at the heart of New Deal reforms and LBJ’s Great Society; they haunt us in reality TV shows like Here Comes Honey Boo Boo and Duck Dynasty. Marginalized as a class, white trash have always been at or near the center of major political debates over the character of the American identity. We acknowledge racial injustice as an ugly stain on our nation’s history. With Isenberg’s landmark book, we will have to face the truth about the enduring, malevolent nature of class as well.

Five Kids And One Gun by Bryan Stevenson

Title Five Kids and One Gun
Author Bryan Stevenson
Publisher AuthorHouse
Release Date 2012-07-25
Category Fiction
Total Pages 296
ISBN 1468587366
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this book I have taken true life events that have actually occurred in my lifetime. My inspiration was about a real life game of Russian roulette. The last soul survivor of five young teenage boys was the one who told me his story. They did not all die from the actual playing of the game, but it did cause the boys a deep depression that took their lives, one by one. However, they did not all die the way my book describes. In fact, one of the boys death’s was context I used from a real incident that took place when I was growing up. He was my friend. This boy was being bullied by six other teenage boys. After beating him up and ramming his head through a plate glass window of the local paramount theater, he decided to end it all and jump in front of a train. Bullying is a serious matter that can effect young minds in ways that are so horrible, you might not fi nd out what is really going on with them, until it is too late. May Tommy rest in peace. But I could not end this book here. I believe that when something bad happens, there are always good things to fall in its place. So I threw a few twists into my writings. There is a forest on the outskirts of my home town that was declared the historical cottonwoods, in which I use as the setting for this book. Wandering through the forest one day, I discovered a rather large naturally hollowed out cottonwood tree. This is where one lucky boys adventures begin. The boys built a real working elevator inside the tree that would lead to the bottom of a two story tree house they also constructed. But it does not end there. A magical book of secrets reveals itself. In this book it tells the story about an underground city as it really happens. Inside the hollow of the tree and approximately ten feet below the surface, an underground elevator is activated, once the owner of the book comes forward. This will lead to a hallway full of doors, each leading to mystical places beyond your wildest dreams. At the end of the first hallway is a rather large room where all hallways begin. A hidden ceiling door slides open with a thunderous ear deafening screech. It is the glass bottom of the Fraser river, in which you are able to view underwater creatures in their natural habitat. Down one of the hallways there is a door to an ancient library that tells the history of the underground. It is referred to as the spell room. There is also another door that leads to the four seasons. A big wooden door separates the hallways full of doors from an underground city called the Packs. Inside this city is a rather unique arena where there is a hockey game like you have never seen before.

Lord Of The Flies by William Golding

Title Lord of the Flies
Author William Golding
Publisher Faber & Faber
Release Date 2012-09-20
Category Fiction
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780571290581
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A plane crashes on a desert island and the only survivors, a group of schoolboys, assemble on the beach and wait to be rescued. By day they inhabit a land of bright fantastic birds and dark blue seas, but at night their dreams are haunted by the image of a terrifying beast. As the boys' delicate sense of order fades, so their childish dreams are transformed into something more primitive, and their behaviour starts to take on a murderous, savage significance. First published in 1954, Lord of the Flies is one of the most celebrated and widely read of modern classics. Now fully revised and updated, this educational edition includes chapter summaries, comprehension questions, discussion points, classroom activities, a biographical profile of Golding, historical context relevant to the novel and an essay on Lord of the Flies by William Golding entitled 'Fable'. Aimed at Key Stage 3 and 4 students, it also includes a section on literary theory for advanced or A-level students. The educational edition encourages original and independent thinking while guiding the student through the text - ideal for use in the classroom and at home.

Watership Down by Richard Adams

Title Watership Down
Author Richard Adams
Publisher Penguin UK
Release Date 2000-08-31
Category Fiction
Total Pages 480
ISBN 9780141937649
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Watership Down by Richard Adams is a true classic. This stirring tale of courage and survival against the odds has become one of the best-loved animal adventures of all time. 'We've got to go away before it's too late.' Fiver was only a small rabbit, but he had a sixth sense and foresaw that disaster was about to destroy the warren. Few believed him. Led by his brother Hazel, a small band of rabbits set out on a perilous journey to find a safe home. Fiver's intuition finally leads them to Watership Down. But here they encounter the greatest threat of all. ***Winner of the Carnegie Medal and the Guardian Children's Fiction Prize*** 'A gripping story of rebellion in a rabbit warren and the subsequent adventures of the rebels. Adams has a poetic eye and a gift for storytelling which will speak to readers of all ages for many years to come' Sunday Times 'A masterpiece. The best story about wild animals since The Wind in the Willows. Very funny, exciting, often moving' Evening Standard 'A great book. A whole world is created, perfectly real in itself, yet constituting a deep incidental comment on human affairs' Guardian Richard Adams grew up in Berkshire, the son of a country doctor. After an education at Oxford, he spent six years in the army and then went into the Civil Service. He originally began telling the story of Watership Down to his two daughters and they insisted he publish it as a book. It quickly became a huge success with both children and adults, and won the Guardian Children's Fiction Award and the Carnegie Medal in 1972. Richard Adams has written many novels and short stories, including Shardik and The Plague Dogs.

Title Leaves of Healing
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1897
Category Spiritual healing
Total Pages 186
ISBN NYPL:33433003133315
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Philosophy manual a South South perspective
Author Chanthalangsy, Phinith
Publisher UNESCO Publishing
Release Date 2014-12-31
Category
Total Pages 244
ISBN 9789231010064
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Community And The World by Torry D. Dickinson

Title Community and the World
Author Torry D. Dickinson
Publisher Nova Publishers
Release Date 2003
Category Social Science
Total Pages 296
ISBN 159033633X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This collection of articles and artwork examines inclusive community development education, which engages members of diverse, often marginalised groups in research and education for social change. Community development education is the democratic and scholarly practice of involving everyday people, from all backgrounds, in the research-based process of designing, starting, and evaluating programs that meet people's needs. The book's varied contributions serve as personalised invitations to: work with others as equals, join democratic social projects, talk to people "you wouldn't have talked to before", value self-education, recognise contributions made by unpaid workers, invent ways to be non-violent, challenge passivity, and use democracy as a way to improve communities and the world. Addressing culture to science, chapters contain work carried out by younger and older scholarly activists in: Women's Studies, anti-racist and anti-colonial studies, history, the social sciences, global studies, community studies, media studies, horticulture, philosophy, education, co-operatives and community service, social-movement organising, project development, political art, and popular music. Each chapter contains diverse themes, comes from multidisciplinary research, and speaks to the subject of education for social change in individual ways. Contributions focus on popular education, self-education, self-defined group education, group-defined university projects, and scholarly activism in local to global movements.

Tar Heel Traveler by Scott Mason

Title Tar Heel Traveler
Author Scott Mason
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield
Release Date 2013-10-01
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780762767434
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A blend of oral history and memoir with a good dose of quirky humor, the Tar Heel Traveler is a celebratory look at the people and places of North Carolina. Mason is the TV reporter—the Tar Heel Traveler—who journeys across North Carolina profiling colorful characters and out-of-the-way places.

Lightning Flowers by Katherine E. Standefer

Title Lightning Flowers
Author Katherine E. Standefer
Publisher Hachette UK
Release Date 2020-11-10
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9780316450355
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Lightning Flowers weighs the impact modern medical technology has had on the author's life against the social and environmental costs inevitably incurred by the mining that makes such innovation possible — “utterly spectacular.” (Rachel Louise Snyder, author of No Visible Bruises) What if a lifesaving medical device causes loss of life along its supply chain? That's the question Katherine E. Standefer finds herself asking one night after being suddenly shocked by her implanted cardiac defibrillator. In this gripping, intimate memoir about health, illness, and the invisible reverberating effects of our medical system, Standefer recounts the astonishing true story of the rare diagnosis that upended her rugged life in the mountains of Wyoming and sent her tumbling into a fraught maze of cardiology units, dramatic surgeries, and slow, painful recoveries. As her life increasingly comes to revolve around the internal defibrillator freshly wired into her heart, she becomes consumed with questions about the supply chain that allows such an ostensibly miraculous device to exist. So she sets out to trace its materials back to their roots. From the sterile labs of a medical device manufacturer in southern California to the tantalum and tin mines seized by armed groups in the Democratic Republic of the Congo to a nickel and cobalt mine carved out of endemic Madagascar jungle, Lightning Flowers takes us on a global reckoning with the social and environmental costs of a technology that promises to be lifesaving but is, in fact, much more complicated. Deeply personal and sharply reported, Lightning Flowers takes a hard look at technological mythos, healthcare, and our cultural relationship to medical technology, raising important questions about our obligations to one another, and the cost of saving one life.

Climate Justice by Mary Robinson

Title Climate Justice
Author Mary Robinson
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing USA
Release Date 2018-09-04
Category Science
Total Pages 176
ISBN 9781632869302
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The antidote for your climate change paralysis. -Sierra Magazine An urgent call to arms by one of the most important voices in the international fight against climate change, sharing inspiring stories and offering vital lessons for the path forward. Holding her first grandchild in her arms in 2003, Mary Robinson was struck by the uncertainty of the world he had been born into. Before his fiftieth birthday, he would share the planet with more than nine billion people--people battling for food, water, and shelter in an increasingly volatile climate. The faceless, shadowy menace of climate change had become, in an instant, deeply personal. Mary Robinson's mission would lead her all over the world, from Malawi to Mongolia, and to a heartening revelation: that an irrepressible driving force in the battle for climate justice could be found at the grassroots level, mainly among women, many of them mothers and grandmothers like herself. From Sharon Hanshaw, the Mississippi matriarch whose campaign began in her East Biloxi hair salon and culminated in her speaking at the United Nations, to Constance Okollet, a small farmer who transformed the fortunes of her ailing community in rural Uganda, Robinson met with ordinary people whose resilience and ingenuity had already unlocked extraordinary change. Powerful and deeply humane, Climate Justice is a stirring manifesto on one of the most pressing humanitarian issues of our time, and a lucid, affirmative, and well-argued case for hope. “As advocate for the forgotten and the ignored, Mary Robinson has not only shone a light on human suffering, but illuminated a better future for our world.” -Barack Obama

Keep A Little Secret by Dorothy Garlock

Title Keep a Little Secret
Author Dorothy Garlock
Publisher Grand Central Publishing
Release Date 2011-03-21
Category Fiction
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9780446574440
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The new novel from the New York Times bestselling author follows Charlotte Tucker, the young girl from Garlock's most recent novel, Stay A Little Longer, into adulthood. As a child, Charlotte Tucker was raised in small town Minnesota where the only real company was the people who came to her aunt Louise's boarding house. Several years later, Charlotte is a young woman and thirsty to get out of her hometown and see the world. When a teaching position opens up in Oklahoma, she jumps at the opportunity to take a room on John Grant's ranch in Sawyer, a small town to the north, to begin her new career. She soon befriends Owen and Hannah Wallace, a brother and sister who have come from Colorado following the death of their mother. Abandoned at an early age by a father they never knew, they are set on revenge against the man who left them -- a man they believe is John Grant. As the summer heats up and a brutal storm wreaks havoc on the town, a secret is revealed that threatens to change Charlotte's life -- and her new friends -- forever.

Title PISA Take the Test Sample Questions from OECD s PISA Assessments
Author OECD
Publisher OECD Publishing
Release Date 2009-02-02
Category
Total Pages 318
ISBN 9789264050815
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book presents all the publicly available questions from the PISA surveys. Some of these questions were used in the PISA 2000, 2003 and 2006 surveys and others were used in developing and trying out the assessment.

A Terrible Thing To Waste by Harriet A. Washington

Title A Terrible Thing to Waste
Author Harriet A. Washington
Publisher Little, Brown Spark
Release Date 2019-07-23
Category Social Science
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9780316509428
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A "powerful and indispensable" look at the devastating consequences of environmental racism (Gerald Markowitz) -- and what we can do to remedy its toxic effects on marginalized communities. Did you know... Middle-class African American households with incomes between $50,000 and $60,000 live in neighborhoods that are more polluted than those of very poor white households with incomes below $10,000. When swallowed, a lead-paint chip no larger than a fingernail can send a toddler into a coma -- one-tenth of that amount will lower his IQ. Nearly two of every five African American homes in Baltimore are plagued by lead-based paint. Almost all of the 37,500 Baltimore children who suffered lead poisoning between 2003 and 2015 were African American. From injuries caused by lead poisoning to the devastating effects of atmospheric pollution, infectious disease, and industrial waste, Americans of color are harmed by environmental hazards in staggeringly disproportionate numbers. This systemic onslaught of toxic exposure and institutional negligence causes irreparable physical harm to millions of people across the country-cutting lives tragically short and needlessly burdening our health care system. But these deadly environments create another insidious and often overlooked consequence: robbing communities of color, and America as a whole, of intellectual power. The 1994 publication of The Bell Curve and its controversial thesis catapulted the topic of genetic racial differences in IQ to the forefront of a renewed and heated debate. Now, in A Terrible Thing to Waste, award-winning science writer Harriet A. Washington adds her incisive analysis to the fray, arguing that IQ is a biased and flawed metric, but that it is useful for tracking cognitive damage. She takes apart the spurious notion of intelligence as an inherited trait, using copious data that instead point to a different cause of the reported African American-white IQ gap: environmental racism - a confluence of racism and other institutional factors that relegate marginalized communities to living and working near sites of toxic waste, pollution, and insufficient sanitation services. She investigates heavy metals, neurotoxins, deficient prenatal care, bad nutrition, and even pathogens as chief agents influencing intelligence to explain why communities of color are disproportionately affected -- and what can be done to remedy this devastating problem. Featuring extensive scientific research and Washington's sharp, lively reporting, A Terrible Thing to Waste is sure to outrage, transform the conversation, and inspire debate.

Migrations by Charlotte McConaghy

Title Migrations
Author Charlotte McConaghy
Publisher Flatiron Books
Release Date 2020-08-04
Category Fiction
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781250204011
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A MOST ANTICIPATED BOOK (Entertainment Weekly, Vogue, Vulture, Elle, Harper's Bazaar, Library Journal, Maclean's, and more) "As beautiful and as wrenching as anything I've ever read...Extraordinary." —Emily St. John Mandel "I recommend Migrations with my whole heart." —Geraldine Brooks For fans of Flight Behavior and Station Eleven, a novel set on the brink of catastrophe, as a young woman chases the world’s last birds—and her own final chance for redemption. Franny Stone has always been a wanderer. By following the ocean’s tides and the birds that soar above, she can forget the losses that have haunted her life. But when the wild she loves begins to disappear, Franny can no longer wander without a destination. She arrives in remote Greenland with one purpose: to find the world’s last flock of Arctic terns and track their final migration. She convinces Ennis Malone, captain of the Saghani, to take her onboard, winning over his eccentric crew with promises that the birds will lead them to fish. As the Saghani fights its way south, Franny’s dark history begins to unspool. Battered by night terrors, accumulating a pile of unsent letters, and obsessed with pursuing the terns at any cost, Franny is full of secrets. When her quest threatens the safety of the entire crew, Franny must ask herself what she is really running toward—and running from. Propelled by a narrator as fierce and fragile as the terns she is following, Charlotte McConaghy's Migrations is both an ode to our threatened world and a breathtaking page-turner about the lengths we will go for the people we love.

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