The Boston Massacre: A Family History

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The Boston Massacre: A Family History
Title The Boston Massacre: A Family History
Author
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Release DateFebruary 18, 2020
Category History
Total Pages 323 pages
ISBN 0544911156
Book Rating 4.4 out of 5 from 114 reviews
Language EN, ES, BE, DA ,DE , NL and FR
Book Review & Summary:

A dramatic untold ‘people’s history’ of the storied event that helped trigger the American Revolution The story of the Boston Massacre—when on a late winter evening in 1770, British soldiers shot five local men to death—is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, many accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose from conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Professor Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. And she reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied these armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs and and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human, now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution. Serena Zabin’s The Boston Massacre delivers an indelible new slant on iconic American Revolutionary history.

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The Boston Massacre by Serena Zabin

Title The Boston Massacre
Author Serena Zabin
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Release Date 2020-02-18
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780544911192
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A dramatic untold ‘people’s history’ of the storied event that helped trigger the American Revolution The story of the Boston Massacre—when on a late winter evening in 1770, British soldiers shot five local men to death—is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, many accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose from conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Professor Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. And she reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied these armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs and and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human, now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution. Serena Zabin’s The Boston Massacre delivers an indelible new slant on iconic American Revolutionary history.

The Boston Massacre by Serena Zabin

Title The Boston Massacre
Author Serena Zabin
Publisher Houghton Mifflin
Release Date 2020
Category Army spouses
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780544911154
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A dramatic untold 'people's history' of the storied event that helped trigger the American Revolution The story of the Boston Massacre--when on a late winter evening in 1770, British soldiers shot five local men to death--is familiar to generations. But from the very beginning, many accounts have obscured a fascinating truth: the Massacre arose from conflicts that were as personal as they were political. Professor Serena Zabin draws on original sources and lively stories to follow British troops as they are dispatched from Ireland to Boston in 1768 to subdue the increasingly rebellious colonists. And she reveals a forgotten world hidden in plain sight: the many regimental wives and children who accompanied these armies. We see these families jostling with Bostonians for living space, finding common cause in the search for a lost child, trading barbs and and sharing baptisms. Becoming, in other words, neighbors. When soldiers shot unarmed citizens in the street, it was these intensely human, now broken bonds that fueled what quickly became a bitterly fought American Revolution. Serena Zabin'sThe Boston Massacre delivers an indelible new slant on iconic American Revolutionary history.

Boston S Massacre by Eric Hinderaker

Title Boston s Massacre
Author Eric Hinderaker
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2017-03-05
Category History
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9780674048331
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The event known as the Boston Massacre is among the most familiar in U.S. history, yet one of the least understood. Eric Hinderaker revisits this dramatic episode, examining the facts of that fateful night, the competing narratives that molded public perceptions, and the long campaign to transform the tragedy into a touchstone of American identity.

Blood On The River by Marjoleine Kars

Title Blood on the River
Author Marjoleine Kars
Publisher The New Press
Release Date 2020-08-11
Category History
Total Pages 186
ISBN 9781620974605
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Named One of the Best Books of the Year by NPR A breathtakingly original work of history that uncovers a massive enslaved persons' revolt that almost changed the face of the Americas On Sunday, February 27, 1763, thousands of slaves in the Dutch colony of Berbice—in present-day Guyana—launched a massive rebellion which came amazingly close to succeeding. Surrounded by jungle and savannah, the revolutionaries (many of them African-born) and Europeans struck and parried for an entire year. In the end, the Dutch prevailed because of one unique advantage—their ability to get soldiers and supplies from neighboring colonies and from Europe. Blood on the River is the explosive story of this little-known revolution, one that almost changed the face of the Americas. Drawing on nine hundred interrogation transcripts collected by the Dutch when the Berbice rebellion finally collapsed, and which were subsequently buried in Dutch archives, historian Marjoleine Kars reconstructs an extraordinarily rich day-by-day account of this pivotal event. Blood on the River provides a rare in-depth look at the political vision of enslaved people at the dawn of the Age of Revolution and introduces us to a set of real characters, vividly drawn against the exotic tableau of a riverine world of plantations, rainforest, and Carib allies who controlled a vast South American hinterland. An astonishing original work of history, Blood on the River will change our understanding of revolutions, slavery, and of the story of freedom in the New World.

The Fifth Of March by Ann Rinaldi

Title The Fifth of March
Author Ann Rinaldi
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Release Date 1993-11-30
Category Juvenile Fiction
Total Pages 352
ISBN 054735116X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

“Carefully researched and lovingly written, Rinaldi’s latest presents a girl indentured to John and Abigail Adams during the tense period surrounding the 1770 Massacre. . . . Fortuitously timed, a novel that illuminates a moment from our past that has strong parallels to recent events. Bibliography.”—Kirkus Reviews

Title American Insurgents American Patriots
Author T. H. Breen
Publisher Hill and Wang
Release Date 2010-05-11
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 1429932600
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Before there could be a revolution, there was a rebellion; before patriots, there were insurgents. Challenging and displacing decades of received wisdom, T. H. Breen's strikingly original book explains how ordinary Americans—most of them members of farm families living in small communities—were drawn into a successful insurgency against imperial authority. This is the compelling story of our national political origins that most Americans do not know. It is a story of rumor, charity, vengeance, and restraint. American Insurgents, American Patriots reminds us that revolutions are violent events. They provoke passion and rage, a willingness to use violence to achieve political ends, a deep sense of betrayal, and a strong religious conviction that God expects an oppressed people to defend their rights. The American Revolution was no exception. A few celebrated figures in the Continental Congress do not make for a revolution. It requires tens of thousands of ordinary men and women willing to sacrifice, kill, and be killed. Breen not only gives the history of these ordinary Americans but, drawing upon a wealth of rarely seen documents, restores their primacy to American independence. Mobilizing two years before the Declaration of Independence, American insurgents in all thirteen colonies concluded that resistance to British oppression required organized violence against the state. They channeled popular rage through elected committees of safety and observation, which before 1776 were the heart of American resistance. American Insurgents, American Patriots is the stunning account of their insurgency, without which there would have been no independent republic as we know it.

Title Whose American Revolution was It
Author Alfred F. Young
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2011-09-01
Category History
Total Pages 287
ISBN 9780814797112
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"This moving account of a key figure in American history contributes greatly to our understanding of the past. It also informs our vision of the servant leader needed to guide the 1990s movement." --Marian Wright Edelman, President, Children's Defense Fund "First-rate intellectual and political history, this study explores the relations between the practical objectives of SNCC and its moral and cultural goals." --Irwin Unger, Author of These United States and Postwar America "Robert Moses emerges from these pages as that rare modern hero, the man whose life enacts his principles, the rebel who steadfastly refuses to be victim or executioner and who mistrusts even his own leadership out of commitment to cultivating the strength, self-reliance, and solidarity of those with and for whom he is working. Eric Burner's engrossing account of Robert Moses's legendary career brings alive the everyday realities of the Civil Rights Movement, especially the gruelling campaign for voter registration and political organization in Mississippi." --Elizabeth Fox-Genovese, Eleonore Raoul Professor of the Humanities, Emory University, author of Within the Plantation Household: Black and White Women of the Old South Next to Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X, Bob Moses was arguably one of the most influential and respected leaders of the civil rights movement. Quiet and intensely private, Moses quickly became legendary as a man whose conduct exemplified leadership by example. He once resigned as head of the Council of Federated Organizations because "my position there was too strong, too central." Despite his centrality to the most important social movement in modern American history, Moses' life and the philosophy on which it is based have only been given cursory treatment and have never been the subject of a book-length biography. Biography is, by its very nature, a complicated act of recovery, even more so when the life under scrutiny deliberately avoids such attention. Eric Burner therefore sets out here not to reveal the "secret" Bob Moses, but to examine his moral philosophy and his political and ideological evolution, to provide a picture of the public person. In essence, his book provides a primer on a figure who spoke by silence and led through example. Moses spent almost three years in Mississippi trying to awaken the state's black citizens to their moral and legal rights before the fateful summer of 1964 would thrust him and the Freedom Summer movement into the national spotlight. We follow him through the civil rights years -- his intensive, fearless tradition of community organizing, his involvements with SNCC and the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, and his negotiations with the Department of Justice --as Burner chronicles both Moses' political activity and his intellectual development, revealing the strong influence of French philosopher Albert Camus on his life and work. Moses' life is marked by the conflict between morality and politics, between purity and pragmatism, which ultimately left him disillusioned with a traditional Left that could talk only of coalitions and leaders from the top. Pursued by the Vietnam draft board for a war which he opposed, Moses fled to Canada in 1966 before departing for Africa in 1969 to spend the next decade teaching in Tanzania. Returning in 1977 under President Carter's amnesty program, he was awarded a five-year MacArthur genius grant in 1982 to establish and develop an innovative program to teach math to Boston's inner-city youth called the Algebra Project. The success of the program, which Moses has referred to as our version of Civil Rights 1992, has landed him on the cover of The New York Times Magazineemphasizing the new, central dimension that math and computer literacy lends to the pursuit of equal rights. And Gently He Shall Lead Them is the story of a remarkable man, an elusive hero of the civil rights movement whose flight from adulation has only served to increase his reputation as an intellectual and moral leader, a man whom nobody ever sees, but whose work is always in evidence. From his role as one of the architects of the civil rights movement thirty years ago to his ongoing work with inner city children, Robert Moses remains one of America's most courageous, energetic, and influential leaders. Wary of the cults of celebrity he saw surrounding Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X and fueled by a philosophy that shunned leadership, Moses has always labored behind the scenes. This first biography, a primer in the life of a unique American, sheds significant light on the intellectual and philosophical worldview of a man who is rarely seen but whose work is always in evidence.

Revolutionary by Alex Myers

Title Revolutionary
Author Alex Myers
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2014-01-14
Category Fiction
Total Pages 311
ISBN 9781451663327
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Describes the story of Deborah Sampson Gannett, who, in defiance of the rigid societal and social norms of her times, ran away from home, disguised herself as a man and helped fight against the British during the American Revolution.

Title A Revolution in Color The World of John Singleton Copley
Author Jane Kamensky
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2016-10-04
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780393608618
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"A stunning biography…[A] truly singular account of the American Revolution." —Amanda Foreman, author of A World on Fire Through an intimate narrative of the life of painter John Singleton Copley, award-winning historian Jane Kamensky reveals the world of the American Revolution, rife with divided loyalties and tangled sympathies. Famed today for his portraits of patriot leaders like Samuel Adams and Paul Revere, Copley is celebrated as one of America’s founding artists. But, married to the daughter of a tea merchant and seeking artistic approval from abroad, he could not sever his own ties with Great Britain. Rather, ambition took him to London just as the war began. His view from abroad as rich and fascinating as his harrowing experiences of patriotism in Boston, Copley’s refusal to choose sides cost him dearly. Yet to this day, his towering artistic legacy remains shared by America and Britain alike.

Title The American Revolution Reader
Author Denver Brunsman
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2014
Category History
Total Pages 460
ISBN 0415537568
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The American Revolution Reader is a collection of leading essays on the American revolutionary era from the eve of the imperial crisis through George Washington's presidency. Articles have been chosen to represent classic themes, such as the British-colonial relationship during the eighteenth century, the political and ideological issues underlying colonial protests, the military conflict, the debates over the Constitution, and the rise of political parties. The volume also captures how the field has been reshaped in recent years, including essays that cover class strife and street politics, the international context of the Revolution, and the roles of women, African Americans and Native Americans, as well as the reshaping of the British Empire after the war. With essays by Gordon S. Wood, Mary Beth Norton, T.H. Breen, John M. Murrin, Gary B. Nash, Woody Holton, Rosemarie Zagarri, John Shy, Alan Taylor, Maya Jasanoff, and many other prominent historians, the collection is ideal for classroom use and any student of the American Revolution.

Title Journal of the American Revolution
Author Todd Andrlik
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2017-05-10
Category United States
Total Pages 408
ISBN 1594162786
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The fourth annual compilation of selected articles from the online Journal of the American Revolution.

John Adams Under Fire by David Fisher

Title John Adams Under Fire
Author David Fisher
Publisher Harlequin
Release Date 2020-03-03
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 313
ISBN 9781488057229
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

*NOW A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER* “An expert, extremely detailed account of John Adams’ finest hour.”—Kirkus Reviews Honoring the 250th Anniversary of the Boston Massacre The New York Times bestselling author of Lincoln’s Last Trial and host of LivePD Dan Abrams and David Fisher tell the story of a trial that would change history. History remembers John Adams as a Founding Father and our country’s second president. But in the tense years before the American Revolution, he was still just a lawyer, fighting for justice in one of the most explosive murder trials of the era. On the night of March 5, 1770, shots were fired by British soldiers on the streets of Boston, killing five civilians. The Boston Massacre has often been called the first shots of the American Revolution. As John Adams would later remember, “On that night the formation of American independence was born.” Yet when the British soldiers faced trial, the young lawyer Adams was determined that they receive a fair one. He volunteered to represent them, keeping the peace in a powder keg of a colony, and in the process created some of the foundations of what would become United States law. In this book, New York Times bestselling authors Dan Abrams and David Fisher draw on the trial transcript, using Adams’s own words to transport readers to colonial Boston, a city roiling with rebellion, where British military forces and American colonists lived side by side, waiting for the spark that would start a war.

Title Most Blessed of the Patriarchs Thomas Jefferson and the Empire of the Imagination
Author Annette Gordon-Reed
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2016-04-13
Category History
Total Pages 400
ISBN 9781631490781
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

New York Times Bestseller Named one of the Best Books of the Year by the San Francisco Chronicle Finalist for the George Washington Prize Finalist for the Library of Virginia Literary Award A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice Selection "An important book…[R]ichly rewarding. It is full of fascinating insights about Jefferson." —Gordon S. Wood, New York Review of Books Hailed by critics and embraced by readers, "Most Blessed of the Patriarchs" is one of the richest and most insightful accounts of Thomas Jefferson in a generation. Following her Pulitzer Prize–winning The Hemingses of Monticello¸ Annette Gordon-Reed has teamed with Peter S. Onuf to present a provocative and absorbing character study, "a fresh and layered analysis" (New York Times Book Review) that reveals our third president as "a dynamic, complex and oftentimes contradictory human being" (Chicago Tribune). Gordon-Reed and Onuf fundamentally challenge much of what we thought we knew, and through their painstaking research and vivid prose create a portrait of Jefferson, as he might have painted himself, one "comprised of equal parts sun and shadow" (Jane Kamensky).

Boston Massacre by Hourly History

Title Boston Massacre
Author Hourly History
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020-04-06
Category
Total Pages 44
ISBN 9798634391731
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Discover the remarkable history of the Boston Massacre...What makes a shooting a massacre? If a mob of hundreds is facing down eight soldiers and five citizens are killed, is that the Boston Massacre or the Incident on King Street? As was the case with so many of the tumultuous events in America's colonial history, the answer depended upon whether one regarded oneself as a British subject or a free American. Loyalists and patriots were already at odds over the idea of separation from Great Britain, and the Boston Massacre, which John Adams regarded as the day the foundation of American independence was laid, catapulted the concept into the forefront of Boston's fate. Future President Adams, although a patriot by inclination, agreed to serve as the defense attorney for the British soldiers charged in the shooting; he believed that everyone was entitled to a fair trial. As he conjured the events of March 5, 1770, in the courtroom, he masterfully instructed the jury to rely on evidence rather than emotion. Was an order to fire upon the crowd given? Were the soldiers acting in self-defense? Were the men who made up the crowd innocent victims or, as Adams attested, a mob? The Boston Massacre played an integral part in the incubation of American independence, but it also proved that while a new nation might spring forth in violence, it would not neglect its allegiance to the law. Discover a plethora of topics such as From Allies to Enemies Taxation Without Representation The Shooting on March 5 How the Incident on King Street Became the Boston Massacre The Origin of Reasonable Doubt Aftermath of the Massacre And much more! So if you want a concise and informative book on the Boston Massacre, simply scroll up and click the "Buy now" button for instant access!

Paul Revere S Ride by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Title Paul Revere s Ride
Author Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
Publisher Puffin Books
Release Date 1996
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 46
ISBN 9780140556124
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The famous narrative poem recreating Paul Revere's midnight ride in 1775 to warn the people of the Boston countryside that the British were coming.

Scars Of Independence by Holger Hoock

Title Scars of Independence
Author Holger Hoock
Publisher Crown Publishing Group (NY)
Release Date 2017
Category National characteristics, American
Total Pages 559
ISBN 9780804137287
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

When we think of the American Revolution, we think of brave patriots coming together to resist a tyrannical ruler in defense of noble ideals. It's a stirring narrative, and one the founders did their best to encourage after the war. But as historian Holger Hoock argues, the truth is far more complex- the Revolution was not only a high-minded battle over principles, but also a profoundly violent civil war-one that shaped the nation in ways we have only begun to understand. In Scars of Independence, Hoock writes the violence back into the story. American Patriots tortured Loyalists and imprisoned them in Connecticut mines; British troops massacred enemy soldiers, raped colonial women, and crowded half-starving prisoners on disease-ridden ships; both sides conscripted African-Americans, who suffered disproportionately as soldiers and slaves; and Washington's army waged a genocidal campaign against the Iroquois nations. In vivid, authoritative prose, Hoock also examines the moral dilemmas posed by this all-pervasive violence, as the British found themselves torn between unlimited war and restraint toward fellow subjects, while the Patriots ingeniously documented war crimes in an effort to unify the fledgling nation, ultimately erasing the trauma of the Loyalists in their midst. For centuries we have whitewashed this history of the Revolution. Scars of Independenceforces a more honest appraisal, and in so doing pre-sents a new origins story that will spark debate for years to come. Elegantly written and meticulously researched, it is history that is both relevant and necessary-an important reminder that forging a nation is rarely bloodless.

Independence Lost by Kathleen DuVal

Title Independence Lost
Author Kathleen DuVal
Publisher Random House Trade Paperbacks
Release Date 2016-04
Category History
Total Pages 464
ISBN 9780812981209
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"In an entirely new, global perspective on the Revolutionary period, Kathleen DuVal reveals personal stories such as that of Irish trader Oliver Pollock, Scottish plantation owners James and Isabella Bruce, and Creek leader Alexander McGillivray for whom the American Revolution was more complicated than the issue of colonial independence. These individuals, their communities, and nations weighed their options, deciding based on personal interests whether independent states or loyal British colonies would best serve them as neighbors, let alone future rulers. DuVal explores how so-called American independence affected the lives of those living on the edges of British colonial America, such as slaves, Indians, women, and the colonists of other European nations and finds that the war left some much more free than others. For most of its duration, the outcome of the Revolutionary War was far from certain. DuVal brings us to a region on the edge of the war where it seems that everyone was hedging their bets--the Gulf Coast. As the British tried to hold onto the thirteen rebelling colonies that would eventually be the nascent United States, their loyal colony of West Florida was left vulnerable to Spanish invasion from the west. With the British stretched thin fighting two wars, the clashing empires found enemies and allies for whom loyalty was a calculation more than a feeling."

The Common Cause by Robert G. Parkinson

Title The Common Cause
Author Robert G. Parkinson
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2016-05-18
Category History
Total Pages 768
ISBN 9781469626925
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

When the Revolutionary War began, the odds of a united, continental effort to resist the British seemed nearly impossible. Few on either side of the Atlantic expected thirteen colonies to stick together in a war against their cultural cousins. In this pathbreaking book, Robert Parkinson argues that to unify the patriot side, political and communications leaders linked British tyranny to colonial prejudices, stereotypes, and fears about insurrectionary slaves and violent Indians. Manipulating newspaper networks, Washington, Jefferson, Adams, Franklin, and their fellow agitators broadcast stories of British agents inciting African Americans and Indians to take up arms against the American rebellion. Using rhetoric like "domestic insurrectionists" and "merciless savages," the founding fathers rallied the people around a common enemy and made racial prejudice a cornerstone of the new Republic. In a fresh reading of the founding moment, Parkinson demonstrates the dual projection of the "common cause." Patriots through both an ideological appeal to popular rights and a wartime movement against a host of British-recruited slaves and Indians forged a racialized, exclusionary model of American citizenship.

American Rebels by Nina Sankovitch

Title American Rebels
Author Nina Sankovitch
Publisher St. Martin's Press
Release Date 2020-03-24
Category History
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781250163295
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Nina Sankovitch’s American Rebels explores, for the first time, the intertwined lives of the Hancock, Quincy, and Adams families, and the role each person played in sparking the American Revolution. Before they were central figures in American history, John Hancock, John Adams, Josiah Quincy Junior, Abigail Smith Adams, and Dorothy Quincy Hancock had forged intimate connections during their childhood in Braintree, Massachusetts. Raised as loyal British subjects who quickly saw the need to rebel, their collaborations against the Crown and Parliament were formed years before the revolution and became stronger during the period of rising taxes and increasing British troop presence in Boston. Together, the families witnessed the horrors of the Boston Massacre, the Battles of Lexington and Concord, and Bunker Hill; the trials and tribulations of the Siege of Boston; meetings of the Continental Congress; transatlantic missions for peace and their abysmal failures; and the final steps that led to the signing of the Declaration of Independence. American Rebels explores how the desire for independence cut across class lines, binding people together as well as dividing them—rebels versus loyalists—as they pursued commonly-held goals of opportunity, liberty, and stability. Nina Sankovitch's new book is a fresh history of our revolution that makes readers look more closely at Massachusetts and the small town of Braintree when they think about the story of America’s early years.

Title In Pursuit of Disobedient Women
Author Dionne Searcey
Publisher Ballantine Books
Release Date 2020
Category Africa, West
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780399179853
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"In 2015, Dionne Searcey was covering the economy for The New York Times, living in Brooklyn with her husband and three young children. Saddled with the demands of a dual-career household and motherhood in an urban setting, her life was in a rut. She decided to pursue a job as the paper's West Africa bureau chief, landing with her family in Dakar, Senegal, where she found their lives turned upside down. They struggled to figure out how they fit into this new region, and their new family dynamic where she became the main breadwinner flying off to work as her husband stayed behind to manage the home front. In Pursuit of Disobedient Women follows Searcey's sometimes harrowing, sometimes rollicking experiences as she works to get Americans to pay attention to the region during the rise of Trump. She is gone from her family for sometimes weeks at a time, often risking her safety while covering stories like Boko Haram-conscripted teen girl suicide bombers or young women in small villages shaking up social norms by getting out of bad marriages. Ultimately, Searcey returns home to reconcile with skinned knees and school plays that happen without her and a begrudging husband thrown into the role of primary parent. Life, for Searcey, as with most of us, is a balancing act. She weaves a tapestry of women living at the crossroads of old-fashioned patriarchy and an increasingly globalized and connected world. The result is a deeply personal and highly compelling look into a modern-day marriage and a world most of us have barely considered"--

Verdicts Of History by Thomas Fleming

Title Verdicts of History
Author Thomas Fleming
Publisher New Word City
Release Date 2016-08-29
Category History
Total Pages 215
ISBN 9781612309743
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In Verdicts of History, New York Times bestselling historian Thomas Fleming highlights six courtroom dramas that changed the future of America. From unexpected verdicts, like the acquittal won by John Adams when he defended British soldiers charged with the Boston Massacre in 1770 to stirred passions when abolitionist John Brown was convicted of murder - a precedent to the Civil War - to the breakthrough in racial relations when Clarence Darrow won a stunning "not guilty" verdict for black physician Ossian Sweet - at a time when black Americans could hardly expect a fair trial. Fleming also includes the trials of Aaron Burr for treason and a well-known congressman for murder. In courtrooms throughout the nation's history, vivid emotion and heated rhetoric have established consequential precedents and enlarged average men and women to historical dimensions.

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