The Book Collectors: A Band of Syrian Rebels and the Stories That Carried Them Through a War

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The Book Collectors: A Band of Syrian Rebels and the Stories That Carried Them Through a War
Title The Book Collectors: A Band of Syrian Rebels and the Stories That Carried Them Through a War
Author
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release DateNovember 3, 2020
Category New Release
Total Pages 208 pages
ISBN 0374115168
Book Rating 4.8 out of 5 from 7 reviews
Language EN, ES, BE, DA ,DE , NL and FR
Book Review & Summary:

"An urgent and compelling account of great bravery and passion." ―Susan Orlean Award-winning journalist Delphine Minoui recounts the true story of a band of young rebels, a besieged Syrian town, and an underground library built from the rubble of war Reading is an act of resistance. Daraya is a town outside Damascus, the very spot where the Syrian Civil War began. Long a site of peaceful resistance to the Assad regimes, Daraya fell under siege in 2012. For four years, no one entered or left, and aid was blocked. Every single day, bombs fell on this place―a place of homes and families, schools and children, now emptied and broken into bits. And then a group searching for survivors stumbled upon a cache of books in the rubble. In a week, they had six thousand volumes; in a month, fifteen thousand. A sanctuary was born: a library where people could escape the blockade, a paper fortress to protect their humanity. The library offered a marvelous range of books―from Arabic poetry to American self-help, Shakespearean plays to stories of war in other times and places. The visitors shared photos and tales of their lives before the war, planned how to build a democracy, and tended the roots of their community despite shell-shocked soil. In the midst of the siege, the journalist Delphine Minoui tracked down one of the library’s founders, twenty-three-year-old Ahmad. Over text messages, WhatsApp, and Facebook, Minoui came to know the young men who gathered in the library, exchanged ideas, learned English, and imagined how to shape the future, even as bombs kept falling from above. By telling their stories, Minoui makes a far-off, complicated war immediate and reveals these young men to be everyday heroes as inspiring as the books they read. The Book Collectors is a testament to their bravery and a celebration of the power of words.

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The Book Collectors by Delphine Minoui

Title The Book Collectors
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Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release Date 2020-11-03
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780374720292
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: NPR "An urgent and compelling account of great bravery and passion." —Susan Orlean Award-winning journalist Delphine Minoui recounts the true story of a band of young rebels, a besieged Syrian town, and an underground library built from the rubble of war Reading is an act of resistance. Daraya is a town outside Damascus, the very spot where the Syrian Civil War began. Long a site of peaceful resistance to the Assad regimes, Daraya fell under siege in 2012. For four years, no one entered or left, and aid was blocked. Every single day, bombs fell on this place—a place of homes and families, schools and children, now emptied and broken into bits. And then a group searching for survivors stumbled upon a cache of books in the rubble. In a week, they had six thousand volumes; in a month, fifteen thousand. A sanctuary was born: a library where people could escape the blockade, a paper fortress to protect their humanity. The library offered a marvelous range of books—from Arabic poetry to American self-help, Shakespearean plays to stories of war in other times and places. The visitors shared photos and tales of their lives before the war, planned how to build a democracy, and tended the roots of their community despite shell-shocked soil. In the midst of the siege, the journalist Delphine Minoui tracked down one of the library’s founders, twenty-three-year-old Ahmad. Over text messages, WhatsApp, and Facebook, Minoui came to know the young men who gathered in the library, exchanged ideas, learned English, and imagined how to shape the future, even as bombs kept falling from above. By telling their stories, Minoui makes a far-off, complicated war immediate and reveals these young men to be everyday heroes as inspiring as the books they read. The Book Collectors is a testament to their bravery and a celebration of the power of words.

The Book Collectors by Delphine Minoui

Title The Book Collectors
Author Delphine Minoui
Publisher Picador
Release Date 2021-10-19
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 224
ISBN 125080017X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR: NPR "An urgent and compelling account of great bravery and passion." —Susan Orlean Award-winning journalist Delphine Minoui recounts the true story of a band of young rebels, a besieged Syrian town, and an underground library built from the rubble of war Reading is an act of resistance. Daraya is a town outside Damascus, the very spot where the Syrian Civil War began. Long a site of peaceful resistance to the Assad regimes, Daraya fell under siege in 2012. For four years, no one entered or left, and aid was blocked. Every single day, bombs fell on this place—a place of homes and families, schools and children, now emptied and broken into bits. And then a group searching for survivors stumbled upon a cache of books in the rubble. In a week, they had six thousand volumes; in a month, fifteen thousand. A sanctuary was born: a library where people could escape the blockade, a paper fortress to protect their humanity. The library offered a marvelous range of books—from Arabic poetry to American self-help, Shakespearean plays to stories of war in other times and places. The visitors shared photos and tales of their lives before the war, planned how to build a democracy, and tended the roots of their community despite shell-shocked soil. In the midst of the siege, the journalist Delphine Minoui tracked down one of the library’s founders, twenty-three-year-old Ahmad. Over text messages, WhatsApp, and Facebook, Minoui came to know the young men who gathered in the library, exchanged ideas, learned English, and imagined how to shape the future, even as bombs kept falling from above. By telling their stories, Minoui makes a far-off, complicated war immediate and reveals these young men to be everyday heroes as inspiring as the books they read. The Book Collectors is a testament to their bravery and a celebration of the power of words.

The Book Collectors by Delphine Minoui

Title The Book Collectors
Author Delphine Minoui
Publisher Thorndike Press Large Print
Release Date 2021
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 235
ISBN 1432887742
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Daraya is a town outside Damascus, the very spot where the Syrian Civil War began. Long a site of peaceful resistance to the Assad regimes, Daraya fell under siege in 2012. For four years, no one entered or left, and aid was blocked. Every single day, bombs fell on this place--a place of homes and families, schools and children, now emptied and broken into bits. And then a group searching for survivors stumbled upon a cache of books in the rubble. In a week, they had six thousand volumes; in a month, fifteen thousand. A sanctuary was born: a library where people could escape the blockade, a paper fortress to protect their humanity. The library offered a marvelous range of books--from Arabic poetry to American self-help, Shakespearean plays to stories of war in other times and places. The visitors shared photos and tales of their lives before the war, planned how to build a democracy, and tended the roots of their community despite shell-shocked soil. In the midst of the siege, the journalist Delphine Minoui tracked down one of the library's founders, twenty-three-year-old Ahmad. Over text messages, WhatsApp, and Facebook, Minoui came to know the young men who gathered in the library, exchanged ideas, learned English, and imagined how to shape the future, even as bombs kept falling from above. By telling their stories, Minoui makes a far-off, complicated war immediate and reveals these young men to be everyday heroes as inspiring as thebooks they read. The Book Collectors is a testament to their bravery and a celebration of the power of words"--

Title The Book Collectors of Daraya
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Publisher Pan Macmillan
Release Date 2021-03-18
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9781529012347
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

‘This is an urgent and compelling account of great bravery and passion. Delphine Minoui has crafted a book that champions books and the individuals who risk everything to preserve them.’ Susan Orlean, author of The Library Book In 2012 the rebel suburb of Daraya in Damascus was brutally besieged by Syrian government forces. Four years of suffering ensued, punctuated by shelling, barrel bombs and chemical gas attacks. People’s homes were destroyed and their food supplies cut off; disease was rife. Yet in this man-made hell, forty young Syrian revolutionaries embarked on an extraordinary project, rescuing all the books they could find in the bombed-out ruins of their home town. They used them to create a secret library, in a safe place, deep underground. It became their school, their university, their refuge. It was a place to learn, to exchange ideas, to dream and to hope. Based on lengthy interviews with these young men, conducted over Skype by the award-winning French journalist Delphine Minoui, The Book Collectors of Daraya is a powerful testament to freedom, tolerance and the power of literature.

I M Writing You From Tehran by Delphine Minoui

Title I m Writing You from Tehran
Author Delphine Minoui
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release Date 2019-04-02
Category Political Science
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780374716578
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A lucid, moving view into an often obscured part of our world, exploring notions of democracy, identity, and the resilience of the human spirit In the wake of losing her beloved grandfather, Delphine Minoui decided to visit Iran for the first time since the revolution. It was 1998. She was twenty-two and a freshly minted journalist. She would stay for ten years. Quickly absorbed into the everyday life of the city, Minoui attends secret dance parties that are raided by the morality police and dines in the home of a young couple active in the Basij—the fearsome militia. She befriends veteran journalists battling government censorship, imprisoned student poets, and her own grandmother (a woman who is discovering the world of international affairs through her contraband satellite TV). And so it is all the more crushing when the political situation falters. Minoui joins street protests teeming with students hungry for change and is interrogated by the secret police; she sees a mirrored rise in the love of country—the yearning patriotism of the left, the militant nationalism of the right. Friends disappear; others may be tracking her movements. She finds love, loses her press credentials, marries, and is separated from her husband by erupting global conflict. Through it all, her love for Iran and its people deepens. In her family’s past she discovers a mission that will shape her entire future. Framed as a letter to her grandfather and filled with disarming characters in momentous times, I’m Writing You from Tehran is a remarkable blend of global history, family memoir, and the making of a reporter, told by someone both insider and outsider—a child of the diaspora who is a world-class political journalist.

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Title Syria s Secret Library
Author Mike Thomson
Publisher PublicAffairs
Release Date 2019-08-20
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781541767614
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The remarkable story of a small, makeshift library in the town of Daraya, and the people who found hope and humanity in its books during a four-year siege. Daraya lies on the fringe of Damascus, just southwest of the Syrian capital. Yet for four years it lived in another world. Besieged by government forces early in the Syrian Civil War, its people were deprived of food, bombarded by heavy artillery, and under the constant fire of snipers. But deep beneath this scene of frightening devastation lay a hidden library. While the streets above echoed with shelling and rifle fire, the secret world below was a haven of books. Long rows of well-thumbed volumes lined almost every wall: bloated editions with grand leather covers, pocket-sized guides to Syrian poetry, and no-nonsense reference books, all arranged in well-ordered lines. But this precious horde was not bought from publishers or loaned by other libraries--they were the books salvaged and scavenged at great personal risk from the doomed city above. The story of this extraordinary place and the people who found purpose and refuge in it is one of hope, human resilience, and above all, the timeless, universal love of literature and the compassion and wisdom it fosters.

Title I Am Nujood Age 10 and Divorced
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Publisher Broadway Books
Release Date 2010
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 188
ISBN 9780307589675
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The true story of a Yemeni child bride describes her forced marriage to an abusive husband three times her age, her pursuit of the marriage's dissolution, and the cultural factors that place girls at risk in Yemeni society.

The Dance Boots by Linda LeGarde Grover

Title The Dance Boots
Author Linda LeGarde Grover
Publisher University of Georgia Press
Release Date 2012
Category Fiction
Total Pages 152
ISBN 9780820342177
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this stirring collection of linked stories, Linda LeGarde Grover portrays an Ojibwe community struggling to follow traditional ways of life in the face of a relentlessly changing world. In the title story an aunt recounts the harsh legacy of Indian boarding schools that tried to break the indigenous culture. In doing so she passes on to her niece the Ojibwe tradition of honoring elders through their stories. In "Refugees Living and Dying in the West End of Duluth," this same niece comes of age in the 1970s against the backdrop of her forcibly dispersed family. A cycle of boarding schools, alcoholism, and violence haunts these stories even as the characters find beauty and solace in their large extended families. With its attention to the Ojibwe language, customs, and history, this unique collection of riveting stories illuminates the very nature of storytelling. The Dance Boots narrates a century's evolution of Native Americans making choices and compromises, often dictated by a white majority, as they try to balance survival, tribal traditions, and obligations to future generations.

George And Lizzie by Nancy Pearl

Title George and Lizzie
Author Nancy Pearl
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2017-09-05
Category Fiction
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781501162916
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From “America’s librarian” and NPR books commentator Nancy Pearl comes an emotional, “Anne-Tyler-esque” (Library Journal) debut novel about an unlikely marriage at a crossroads. George and Lizzie are a couple, meeting as college students and marrying soon after graduation, but no one would ever describe them of being soulmates. George grew up in a warm and loving family—his father an orthodontist, his mother a stay-at-home mom—while Lizzie was the only child of two famous psychologists, who viewed her more as an in-house experiment than a child to love. After a decade of marriage, nothing has changed—George is happy; Lizzie remains…unfulfilled. But when George discovers that Lizzie has been searching for the whereabouts of an old boyfriend, Lizzie is forced to decide what love means to her, what George means to her, and whether her life with George is the one she wants. With pitch-perfect prose and compassion and humor to spare, George and Lizzie is “a richly absorbing portrait of a perfectly imperfect marriage,” (Amy Poeppel, author of Small Admissions), and “a story of forgiveness, especially for one’s self” (The Washington Post).

The Deed by Gerold Frank

Title The Deed
Author Gerold Frank
Publisher Pickle Partners Publishing
Release Date 2017-07-31
Category History
Total Pages 286
ISBN 9781787207769
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A NON-FICTION THRILLER BY THE AUTHOR OF “THE BOSTON STRANGLER” TWO YOUNG RADICALS ASSASSINATE A HIGH GOVERNMENT OFFICIAL. WERE THEY PATRIOTS OR MURDERERS? CAIRO, EGYPT: The car moved slowly through the baking heat and noise of the city and finally arrived at Lord Moyne’s residence. The car halted and the chauffeur hurried to open the door for the British Ambassador. On the other side, two figures leapt up and raced toward the car—both carrying revolvers. One youth reached the automobile, wrenched open the back door and fired three times at Lord Moyne. “Stop, murderers, stop!” Within seconds police had captured the two. “Who are you? Why have you done this?” One boy spoke. “We have nothing to say. We await the judgment of mankind.” “Brilliant and suspenseful. I can think of few reading experiences in the last year as compelling as The Deed.”—Los Angeles Times “SPELLBINDING SUSPENSE...a slice of history beautifully and accurately told. The Deed is by far the finest book Gerold Frank has ever written; it is easy to read but awfully, awfully hard to forget.”—Quentin Reynolds, Saturday Review “COMPELLING, IMPORTANT. Even if it were not true—and it is agonizingly true—it would be a genuine literary work. It is a book not to be forgotten.”—Herald Tribune “A NARRATIVE THAT WON’T LET YOU GO...moving and disturbing.”—Chicago Tribune “POWER AND POIGNANCY...gives life to a footnote in history. The opening prickles with suspense. The book reaches a climax of genuine pathos. Few, I predict, will fail to be moved by the closing pages of The Deed.”—John Barkham, Saturday Review Syndicate

Saviors And Survivors by Mahmood Mamdani

Title Saviors and Survivors
Author Mahmood Mamdani
Publisher Crown
Release Date 2010-05-25
Category Political Science
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780307591180
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the author of Good Muslim, Bad Muslim comes an important book, unlike any other, that looks at the crisis in Darfur within the context of the history of Sudan and examines the world’s response to that crisis. In Saviors and Survivors, Mahmood Mamdani explains how the conflict in Darfur began as a civil war (1987—89) between nomadic and peasant tribes over fertile land in the south, triggered by a severe drought that had expanded the Sahara Desert by more than sixty miles in forty years; how British colonial officials had artificially tribalized Darfur, dividing its population into “native” and “settler” tribes and creating homelands for the former at the expense of the latter; how the war intensified in the 1990s when the Sudanese government tried unsuccessfully to address the problem by creating homelands for tribes without any. The involvement of opposition parties gave rise in 2003 to two rebel movements, leading to a brutal insurgency and a horrific counterinsurgency–but not to genocide, as the West has declared. Mamdani also explains how the Cold War exacerbated the twenty-year civil war in neighboring Chad, creating a confrontation between Libya’s Muammar al-Qaddafi (with Soviet support) and the Reagan administration (allied with France and Israel) that spilled over into Darfur and militarized the fighting. By 2003, the war involved national, regional, and global forces, including the powerful Western lobby, who now saw it as part of the War on Terror and called for a military invasion dressed up as “humanitarian intervention.” Incisive and authoritative, Saviors and Survivors will radically alter our understanding of the crisis in Darfur.

A Soldier First by Rick Hillier

Title A Soldier First
Author Rick Hillier
Publisher HarperCollins Canada
Release Date 2010-06-01
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9781554688463
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the summer of 2008, General Rick Hillier retired as Chief of the Defence staff of the Canadian Forces. You could almost hear the sigh of relief in Ottawa as Canada’s most popular, and most controversial, military leader since the Second World War left a role in which he’d been as frank, unpredictable and resolutely apolitical as any of his predecessors. Born and raised in Newfoundland, Hillier joined the military as a young man and quickly climbed the ranks. He played a significant role in such domestic challenges as the ice storm that paralyzed much of eastern Ontario and Quebec in 1998, and quickly became a player on the international scene, commanding an American corps in Texas and a multinational NATO task force in Bosnia-Herzegovina. But it was his role as General Rick Hillier, Canada’s Chief of the Defence staff, that defined him as a Canadian icon. In Afghanistan, Canada faced its first combat losses since the Korean War, with every casualty becoming front page news. A country formerly ambivalent, or even angry, about its role in the conflict suddenly became gripped by the drama unfolding not only in a war zone halfway around the world but in unfriendly conference rooms in Ottawa. There, as everywhere, Hillier pulled no punches, demanding more funding, more troops and more appreciation for the women and men fighting a war on foreign soil. This hard-hitting, honest account of Hillier’s role—told in his own words—will be one of the most important books published in Canada this decade.

438 Days by Jonathan Franklin

Title 438 Days
Author Jonathan Franklin
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2015-11-17
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781501116315
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Declared “the best survival book in a decade” by Outside Magazine, 438 Days is the true story of the man who survived fourteen months in a small boat drifting seven thousand miles across the Pacific Ocean. On November 17, 2012, two men left the coast of Mexico for a weekend fishing trip in the open Pacific. That night, a violent storm ambushed them as they were fishing eighty miles offshore. As gale force winds and ten-foot waves pummeled their small, open boat from all sides and nearly capsized them, captain Salvador Alvarenga and his crewmate cut away a two-mile-long fishing line and began a desperate dash through crashing waves as they sought the safety of port. Fourteen months later, on January 30, 2014, Alvarenga, now a hairy, wild-bearded and half-mad castaway, washed ashore on a nearly deserted island on the far side of the Pacific. He could barely speak and was unable to walk. He claimed to have drifted from Mexico, a journey of some seven thousand miles. A “gripping saga,” (Daily Mail), 438 Days is the first-ever account of one of the most amazing survival stories in modern times. Based on dozens of hours of exclusive interviews with Alvarenga, his colleagues, search-and-rescue officials, the remote islanders who found him, and the medical team that saved his life, 438 Days is not only “an intense, immensely absorbing read” (Booklist) but an unforgettable study of the resilience, will, ingenuity and determination required for one man to survive more than a year lost and adrift at sea.

Title When America Stopped Being Great
Author Nick Bryant
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date 2021-03-04
Category Political Science
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781472985491
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

'Nick Bryant is brilliant. He has a way of showing you what you've been missing from the whole story whilst never leaving you feeling stupid.' – Emily Maitlis 'Bryant is a genuine rarity, a Brit who understands America' – Washington Post In When America Stopped Being Great, veteran reporter and BBC New York correspondent Nick Bryant reveals how America's decline paved the way for Donald Trump's rise, sowing division and leaving the country vulnerable to its greatest challenge of the modern era. Deftly sifting through almost four decades of American history, from post-Cold War optimism, through the scandal-wracked nineties and into the new millennium, Bryant unpacks the mistakes of past administrations, from Ronald Reagan's 'celebrity presidency' to Barack Obama's failure to adequately address income and racial inequality. He explains how the historical clues, unseen by many (including the media) paved the way for an outsider to take power and a country to slide towards disaster. As Bryant writes, 'rather than being an aberration, Trump's presidency marked the culmination of so much of what had been going wrong in the United States for decades – economically, racially, politically, culturally, technologically and constitutionally.' A personal elegy for an America lost, unafraid to criticise actors on both sides of the political divide, When America Stopped Being Great takes the long view, combining engaging storytelling with recent history to show how the country moved from the optimism of Reagan's 'Morning in America' to the darkness of Trump's 'American Carnage'. It concludes with some of the most dramatic events in recent memory, in an America torn apart by a bitterly polarised election, racial division, the national catastrophe of the coronavirus and the threat to US democracy evidenced by the storming of Capitol Hill.

Title Now We Can Talk Openly About Men
Author Martina Evans
Publisher Carcanet Press Ltd
Release Date 2018-05-31
Category Poetry
Total Pages 88
ISBN 9781784105792
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Shortlisted for the 2019 Irish Times Poetry Now Award Shortlisted for the 2019 Pigott Poetry Award Shortlisted for the 2019 Roehampton Poetry Prize Featured in the TLS & Irish Times Books of the Year 2018 Martina Evans’s Now We Can Talk Openly about Men is a pair of dramatic monologues, snapshots of the lives of two women in 1920s Ireland. The first, Kitty Donovan, is a dressmaker in the time of the Irish War of Independence. The second, Babe Cronin, is set in 1924, shortly after the Irish Civil War. Kitty is a dressmaker with a taste for laudanum. Babe is a stenographer who has fallen in love with a young revolutionary. Through their separate, overlapping stories, Evans colours an era and a culture seldom voiced in verse. Set back some years from their stories, both women find a strand of humour in what took place, even as they recall the passion, vertigo and terror of those times. A dream-like compulsion in their voices adds a sense of retrospective inevitability. The use of intense, almost psychedelic colour in the first half of the book opposes the flattened, monochrome language of the second half. This is a work of vivid contrasts, of age and youth, women and men, the Irish and the English: complementary stories of balance, imbalance, and transition.

Forgotten Work by Jason Guriel

Title Forgotten Work
Author Jason Guriel
Publisher Biblioasis
Release Date 2020-09-29
Category Fiction
Total Pages 186
ISBN 9781771963831
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the year 2063, on the edge of the Crater formerly known as Montréal, a middle-aged man and his ex’s daughter search for a cult hero: the leader of a short-lived band named after a forgotten work of poetry and known to fans through a forgotten work of music criticism. In this exuberantly plotted verse novel, Guriel follows an obsessive cult-following through the twenty-first century. Some things change (there’s metamorphic smart print for music mags; the Web is called the “Zuck”). Some things don’t (poetry readings are still, mostly, terrible). But the characters, including a robot butler who stands with Ishiguro’s Stevens as one of the great literary domestics, are unforgettable. Splicing William Gibson with Roberto Bolaño, Pale Fire with Thomas Pynchon, Forgotten Work is a time-tripping work of speculative fiction. It’s a love story about fandom, an ode to music snobs, a satire on the human need to value the possible over the actual—and a verse novel of Nabokovian virtuosity.

Sleeping On A Wire by David Grossman

Title Sleeping on a Wire
Author David Grossman
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release Date 2003-04-19
Category Political Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781466804180
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Israel describes itself as a Jewish state. What, then, is the status of the one-fifth of its citizens who are not Jewish? Are they Israelis, or are they Palestinians? Or are they a people without a country? How will a Palestinian state—if it is established—influence the sense of belonging and identity of Palestinian Israeli citizens? Based on conversations with Palestinians in Israel, David Grossman's Sleeping on a Wire, like The Yellow Wind, is essential reading for anyone trying to understand the Middle East today.

Importing Into The United States by United States Customs Service

Title Importing Into the United States
Author United States Customs Service
Publisher The Minerva Group, Inc.
Release Date 2002-06
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 132
ISBN 0894990772
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This publication provides an overview of the importing process and contains general information about import requirements. This edition contains much new and revised material brought about because of changes in the law, particularly the Customs Modernization Act. The Customs modernization provisions has fundamentally altered the process by shifting to the importer the legal responsibility for declaring the value, classification, and rate of duty applicable to entered merchandise.Chapters cover entry of goods, informed compliance, invoices, assessment of duty, classification and value, marking, special requirements for alcoholic beverages, motor vehicles and boats, import quotas, fraud, and foreign trade zones.In addition to the material provided by the U. S. Customs Service, the private commercial publisher of this book has provided a bonus chapter on how to build a tax-free import-export business.

Title The 9 11 Commission Report Final Report of the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States Authorized Edition
Author National Commission on Terrorist Attacks
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2011-05-16
Category History
Total Pages 592
ISBN 9780393342154
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Nearly three thousand people died in the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. In Lower Manhattan, on a field in Pennsylvania, and along the banks of the Potomoc, the United States suffered the single largest loss of life from an enemy attack on its soil. In November 2002 the United States Congress and President George W. Bush established by law the National Commission on Terrorist Attacks Upon the United States, also known as the 9/11 Commission. This independent, bipartisan panel was directed to examine the facts and circumstances surrounding the September 11 attacks, identify lessons learned, and provide recommendations to safeguard against future acts of terrorism. This volume is the authorized edition of the Commission's final report.

The Library by Stuart Kells

Title The Library
Author Stuart Kells
Publisher Catapult
Release Date 2018-04-10
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781640090217
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

""Excellent . . . Tracks the history of that greatest of all cultural institutions." —The Washington Post Libraries are much more than mere collections of volumes. The best are magical, fabled places whose fame has become part of the cultural wealth they are designed to preserve. Some still exist today; some are lost, like those of Herculaneum and Alexandria; some have been sold or dispersed; and some never existed, such as those libraries imagined by J.R.R. Tolkien, Umberto Eco, and Jorge Luis Borges, among others. Ancient libraries, grand baroque libraries, scientific libraries, memorial libraries, personal libraries, clandestine libraries: Stuart Kells tells the stories of their creators, their prizes, their secrets, and their fate. To research this book, Kells traveled around the world with his young family like modern–day “Library Tourists.” Kells discovered that all the world’s libraries are connected in beautiful and complex ways, that in the history of libraries, fascinating patterns are created and repeated over centuries. More important, he learned that stories about libraries are stories about people, containing every possible human drama. The Library is a fascinating and engaging exploration of libraries as places of beauty and wonder. It’s a celebration of books as objects, a celebration of the anthropology and physicality of books and bookish space, and an account of the human side of these hallowed spaces by a leading and passionate bibliophile.

Title Father of Lions the Story of Mosul Zoo
Author Louise Callaghan
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2019-10
Category Animal rescue
Total Pages 400
ISBN 1789544548
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is a story of human decency in the midst of barbarism - how the zookeeper of Mosul Zoo saved the animals during the Isis rule of the city between 2014 and 2017. 'This is an unexpectedly funny and moving book. You might not expect to laugh when reading about ISIS-held Mosul, but through the story of a man who loves both lions and life, Louise Callaghan shows how humour and defiance can counter cruelty, and why both humans and animals crave freedom' Lindsey Hilsum, International Editor, Channel 4 News and author of In Extremis: the life of war correspondent Marie Colvin . Between 2014 and 2017, the 'Islamic State' ruled the city of Mosul, in northern Iraq, killing 'traitors', destroying books and oppressing women. But miraculously, in a park on the eastern edge of the Tigris, a zoo was kept open. Father of Lions is the story of Mosul Zoo. It survived under the stern hand of Abu Laith, the zookeeper, a man with an interesting past and a lifelong animal lover. His real name was Imad, but for as long as he could remember everyone had called him by his nickname, Abu Laith - 'Father of Lions'. And the lions and bears survived not only two years of Isis occupation, but starvation and bombardment by liberating forces. As the animals began to starve, Abu Laith and his family and helpers went hungry to keep them alive. They risked their lives to pick through bins for leftovers in Isis-occupied neighbourhoods. In a final heroic effort, the surviving animals were smuggled out of Iraq in a daring rescue operation. This is a story of human decency in the midst of barbarism.

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