Download Why Societies Need Dissent Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online Why Societies Need Dissent full books anytime and anywhere. Click download or read online button and get unlimited access by create free account.

Why Societies Need Dissent by Cass R. Sunstein

Title Why Societies Need Dissent
Author Cass R. Sunstein
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2005
Category Political Science
Total Pages 246
ISBN 0674017684
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Dissenters are often portrayed as selfish and disloyal, but Sunstein shows that those who reject pressures imposed by others perform valuable social functions, often at their own expense.

Title Dissenting Voices in American Society
Author Austin Sarat
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2012-01-31
Category Law
Total Pages 237
ISBN 9781107014237
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Dissenting Voices in American Society: The Role of Judges, Lawyers, and Citizens explores the status of dissent in the work and lives of judges, lawyers, and citizens, and in our institutions and culture. It brings together under the lens of critical examination dissenting voices that are usually treated separately: the protester, the academic critic, the intellectual, and the dissenting judge. It examines the forms of dissent that institutions make possible and those that are discouraged or domesticated. This book also describes the kinds of stories that dissenting voices try to tell and the narrative tropes on which those stories depend. This book is the product of an integrated series of symposia at the University of Alabama School of Law. These symposia bring leading scholars into colloquy with faculty at the law school on subjects at the cutting edge of interdisciplinary inquiry in law.

Why Dissent Matters by William Kaplan

Title Why Dissent Matters
Author William Kaplan
Publisher McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
Release Date 2017
Category Political Science
Total Pages 356
ISBN 9780773550704
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

An inquiry into dissent and how it might save the world.

Title Utopia and Dissent in West Germany
Author Mia Lee
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2019-01-22
Category Social Science
Total Pages 200
ISBN 9780429753060
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Just as Chancellor Konrad Adenauer was seeking re-election on a campaign of "no experiments," art avant-garde groups in West Germany were reviving the utopian impulse to unite art and society. Utopia and Dissent in West Germany examines these groups and their legacy. Postwar artists built international as well as intergenerational networks such as Fluxus, which was active in Düsseldorf, Wiesbaden, and Cologne, and the Situationist International based in Paris. These groups were committed to undoing the compartmentalization of everyday life and the isolation of the artist in society. And as artists recast politics to address culture and everyday life, they helped forge a path for the West German extraparliamentary left. Utopia and Dissent in West Germany traces these connections and presents a chronological map of the networks that fed into the extraparliamentary left as well as a geographical map of increasing radicalism as the locus of action shifted to West Berlin. These two maps show that in West Germany artists and their interventions in the structures of everyday life were a key starting point for challenging the postwar order.

Teaching For Dissent by Sarah Marie Stitzlein

Title Teaching for Dissent
Author Sarah Marie Stitzlein
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2015-11-17
Category Political Science
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9781317250920
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Teaching for Dissent looks at the implications of new forms of dissent for educational practice. The reappearance of dissent in political meetings and street protests opens new possibilities for improved democratic life and citizen participation. This book argues that this possibility will not be fulfilled if schools do not cultivate the skills necessary for our citizens to engage in political dissent. The authors look at how practices in schools, such as the testing regime and the 'hidden curriculum', suppress students' ability to voice ideas that stand in opposition to the status quo. Teaching for Dissent calls for a realignment of the curriculum and the practices of schooling with a guiding vision of democratic participation.

Dissent From War by Robert L. Ivie

Title Dissent from War
Author Robert L. Ivie
Publisher Kumarian Press
Release Date 2007
Category Political Science
Total Pages 241
ISBN 9781565492400
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The rhetorical presumption of war's necessity makes violence regrettable, but seemingly sane, and functions to shame anyone who opposes military action. Ivie proposes that the presence of dissent is actually a healthy sign of democratic citizenship, and a responsible and productive act, which has been dangerously miscast as a threat to national security. Ivie, a former US Navy petty officer, puts a microscope to the language of war supporters throughout history and follows the lives and memories of soldiers and anti-war activists who have dealt with degrees of confusion and guilt about their opposition to war. Arguing that informed dissent plays out largely in the realm of rhetoric, he equips readers with strategies for resisting the dehumanizing language used in war propaganda. Through his careful study of language strategies, he makes it possible to foster a community where dissenting voices are valued and vital.

The Political Is Political by Lorna Finlayson

Title The Political is Political
Author Lorna Finlayson
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield
Release Date 2015-05-26
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 240
ISBN 9781783482887
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book is a critical exposé of the ways in which mainstream political philosophy silences dissent.

Threat Of Dissent by Julia Rose Kraut

Title Threat of Dissent
Author Julia Rose Kraut
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2020-07-21
Category Law
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9780674246171
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In this first comprehensive overview of the intersection of immigration law and the First Amendment, a lawyer and historian traces ideological exclusion and deportation in the United States from the Alien Friends Act of 1798 to the evolving policies of the Trump administration. Beginning with the Alien Friends Act of 1798, the United States passed laws in the name of national security to bar or expel foreigners based on their beliefs and associations—although these laws sometimes conflict with First Amendment protections of freedom of speech and association or contradict America’s self-image as a nation of immigrants. The government has continually used ideological exclusions and deportations of noncitizens to suppress dissent and radicalism throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, from the War on Anarchy to the Cold War to the War on Terror. In Threat of Dissent—the first social, political, and legal history of ideological exclusion and deportation in the United States—Julia Rose Kraut delves into the intricacies of major court decisions and legislation without losing sight of the people involved. We follow the cases of immigrants and foreign-born visitors, including activists, scholars, and artists such as Emma Goldman, Ernest Mandel, Carlos Fuentes, Charlie Chaplin, and John Lennon. Kraut also highlights lawyers, including Clarence Darrow and Carol Weiss King, as well as organizations, like the ACLU and PEN America, who challenged the constitutionality of ideological exclusions and deportations under the First Amendment. The Supreme Court, however, frequently interpreted restrictions under immigration law and upheld the government’s authority. By reminding us of the legal vulnerability foreigners face on the basis of their beliefs, expressions, and associations, Kraut calls our attention to the ways that ideological exclusion and deportation reflect fears of subversion and serve as tools of political repression in the United States.

Title Criminalizing Dissent
Author Rob Watts
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2019-06-25
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 290
ISBN 9781351039567
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

While liberal-democratic states like America, Britain and Australia claim to value freedom of expression and the right to dissent, they have always actually criminalized dissent. This disposition has worsened since 9/11 and the 2008 Great Recession. This ground-breaking study shows that just as dissent involves far more than protest marches, so too liberal-democratic states have expanded the criminalization of dissent. Drawing on political and social theorists like Arendt, Bourdieu and Isin, the book offers a new way of thinking about politics, dissent and its criminalization relationally. Using case studies like the Occupy movement, selective refusal by Israeli soldiers, urban squatters, democratic education and violence by anti-Apartheid activists, the book highlights the many forms dissent takes along with the many ways liberal-democratic states criminalize it. The book highlights the mix of fear and delusion in play when states privilege security to protect an imagined ‘political order’ from difference and disagreement. The book makes a major contribution to political theory, legal studies and sociology. Linking legal, political and normative studies in new ways, Watts shows that ultimately liberal-democracies rely more on sovereignty and the capacity for coercion and declarations of legal ‘states of exception’ than on liberal-democratic principles. In a time marked by a deepening crisis of democracy, the book argues dissent is increasingly valuable.

Dissent In Organizations by Jeffrey Kassing

Title Dissent in Organizations
Author Jeffrey Kassing
Publisher Polity
Release Date 2011-07-12
Category Social Science
Total Pages 226
ISBN 9780745651392
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Employees often disagree with workplace policies and practices, leaving few workplaces unaffected by organizational dissent. While disagreement persists in most contemporary organizations, how employees express dissent at work and how their respective organizations respond to it vary widely. Through the use of case studies, first-person accounts, current examples, conceptual models, and scholarly findings this work offers a comprehensive treatment of organizational dissent. Readers will find a sensible balance between theoretical considerations and practical applications. Theoretical considerations include: how dissent fits within classical and contemporary organizational communication approaches dissent's relationship to, yet distinctiveness from, related organizational concepts like conflict, resistance, and voice explanations for why employees express dissent and how they make sense of it the relationship between organizational dissent and ethics Practical applications encompass: recommendations for employees expressing dissent and managers responding to it consideration of the range of events that trigger dissent strategies employees use to express dissent and tools organizations can apply to solicit it effectively the unique challenges and benefits associated with expressing dissent to management The book's specific focus and engaged voice provide students, scholars, and practitioners with a deeper understanding of dissent as an important aspect of workplace communication.

Policing Dissent by Luis Fernandez

Title Policing Dissent
Author Luis Fernandez
Publisher Rutgers University Press
Release Date 2008-02-04
Category Social Science
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780813544748
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In November 1999, fifty-thousand anti-globalization activists converged on Seattle to shut down the World Trade Organization’s Ministerial Meeting. Using innovative and network-based strategies, the protesters left police flummoxed, desperately searching for ways to control the emerging anti-corporate globalization movement. Faced with these network-based tactics, law enforcement agencies transformed their policing and social control mechanisms to manage this new threat. Policing Dissent provides a firsthand account of the changing nature of control efforts employed by law enforcement agencies when confronted with mass activism. The book also offers readers the richness of experiential detail and engaging stories often lacking in studies of police practices and social movements. This book does not merely seek to explain the causal relationship between repression and mobilization. Rather, it shows how social control strategies act on the mind and body of protesters.

Worlds Of Dissent by Jonathan Bolton

Title Worlds of Dissent
Author Jonathan Bolton
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2012-04-13
Category History
Total Pages 360
ISBN 9780674064836
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Worlds of Dissent analyzes the myths of Central European resistance popularized by Western journalists and historians, and replaces them with a picture of the struggle against state repression as the dissidents themselves understood, debated, and lived it. In the late 1970s, when Czech intellectuals, writers, and artists drafted Charter 77 and called on their government to respect human rights, they hesitated to name themselves "dissidents." Their personal and political experiences--diverse, uncertain, nameless--have been obscured by victory narratives that portray them as larger-than-life heroes who defeated Communism in Czechoslovakia. Jonathan Bolton draws on diaries, letters, personal essays, and other first-person texts to analyze Czech dissent less as a political philosophy than as an everyday experience. Bolton considers not only Václav Havel but also a range of men and women writers who have received less attention in the West--including Ludvík Vaculík, whose 1980 diary The Czech Dream Book is a compelling portrait of dissident life. Bolton recovers the stories that dissidents told about themselves, and brings their dilemmas and decisions to life for contemporary readers. Dissidents often debated, and even doubted, their own influence as they confronted incommensurable choices and the messiness of real life. Portraying dissent as a human, imperfect phenomenon, Bolton frees the dissidents from the suffocating confines of moral absolutes. Worlds of Dissent offers a rare opportunity to understand the texture of dissent in a closed society.

Dark Ghettos by Tommie Shelby

Title Dark Ghettos
Author Tommie Shelby
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2016-11
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 340
ISBN 9780674970502
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Why do American ghettos persist? Scholars and commentators often identify some factor—such as single motherhood, joblessness, or violent street crime—as the key to solving the problem and recommend policies accordingly. But, Tommie Shelby argues, these attempts to “fix” ghettos or “help” their poor inhabitants ignore fundamental questions of justice and fail to see the urban poor as moral agents responding to injustice. “Provocative...[Shelby] doesn’t lay out a jobs program or a housing initiative. Indeed, as he freely admits, he offers ‘no new political strategies or policy proposals.’ What he aims to do instead is both more abstract and more radical: to challenge the assumption, common to liberals and conservatives alike, that ghettos are ‘problems’ best addressed with narrowly targeted government programs or civic interventions. For Shelby, ghettos are something more troubling and less tractable: symptoms of the ‘systemic injustice’ of the United States. They represent not aberrant dysfunction but the natural workings of a deeply unfair scheme. The only real solution, in this way of thinking, is the ‘fundamental reform of the basic structure of our society.’” —James Ryerson, New York Times Book Review

Protest And Dissent by Melissa Schwartzberg

Title Protest and Dissent
Author Melissa Schwartzberg
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2020-03-03
Category Law
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781479810512
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Essays on the justification, strategy, and limits of mass protests and political dissent In Protest and Dissent, the latest installment of the NOMOS series, distinguished scholars from the fields of political science, law, and philosophy provide a fresh, interdisciplinary perspective on the potential—and limits—of mass protest and disobedience in today’s age. Featuring ten timely essays, the contributors address a number of contemporary movements, from Black Lives Matter and the Women’s March, to Occupy Wall Street and Standing Rock. Ultimately, this volume challenges us to re-imagine the boundaries between civil and uncivil disagreement, political reform and radical transformation, and democratic ends and means. Protest and Dissent offers thought-provoking insights into a new era of political resistance.

Conformity by Cass R. Sunstein

Title Conformity
Author Cass R. Sunstein
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2019-05-28
Category Psychology
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781479846849
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Bestselling author Cass R. Sunstein reveals the appeal and the danger of conformity We live in an era of tribalism, polarization, and intense social division—separating people along lines of religion, political conviction, race, ethnicity, and sometimes gender. How did this happen? In Conformity, Cass R. Sunstein argues that the key to making sense of living in this fractured world lies in understanding the idea of conformity—what it is and how it works—as well as the countervailing force of dissent. An understanding of conformity sheds new light on many issues confronting us today: the role of social media, the rise of fake news, the growth of authoritarianism, the success of Donald Trump, the functions of free speech, debates over immigration and the Supreme Court, and much more. Lacking information of our own and seeking the good opinion of others, we often follow the crowd, but Sunstein shows that when individuals suppress their own instincts about what is true and what is right, it can lead to significant social harm. While dissenters tend to be seen as selfish individualists, dissent is actually an important means of correcting the natural human tendency toward conformity and has enormous social benefits in reducing extremism, encouraging critical thinking, and protecting freedom itself. Sunstein concludes that while much of the time it is in the individual’s interest to follow the crowd, it is in the social interest for individuals to say and do what they think is best. A well-functioning democracy depends on it.

Title Design and Political Dissent
Author Jilly Traganou
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2020-10-27
Category Design
Total Pages 306
ISBN 9781351187985
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book examines, through an interdisciplinary lens, the relationship between political dissent and processes of designing. In the past twenty years, theorists of social movements have noted a diversity of visual and performative manifestations taking place in protest, while the fields of design, broadly defined, have been characterized by a growing interest in activism. The book’s premise stems from the recognition that material engagement and artifacts have the capacity to articulate political arguments or establish positions of disagreement. Its contributors look at a wide array of material practices generated by both professional and nonprofessional design actors around the globe, exploring case studies that vary from street protests and encampments to design pedagogy and community-empowerment projects. For students and scholars of design studies, urbanism, visual culture, politics, and social movements, this book opens up new perspectives on design and its place in contemporary politics.

Voicing Dissent by Casey Rebecca Johnson

Title Voicing Dissent
Author Casey Rebecca Johnson
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2018-02-01
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 202
ISBN 9781351721561
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Disagreement is, for better or worse, pervasive in our society. Not only do we form beliefs that differ from those around us, but increasingly we have platforms and opportunities to voice those disagreements and make them public. In light of the public nature of many of our most important disagreements, a key question emerges: How does public disagreement affect what we know? This volume collects original essays from a number of prominent scholars—including Catherine Elgin, Sanford Goldberg, Jennifer Lackey, Michael Patrick Lynch, and Duncan Pritchard, among others—to address this question in its diverse forms. The book is organized by thematic sections, in which individual chapters address the epistemic, ethical, and political dimensions of dissent. The individual contributions address important issues such as the value of disagreement, the nature of conversational disagreement, when dissent is epistemically rational, when one is obligated to voice disagreement or to object, the relation of silence and resistance to dissent, and when political dissent is justified. Voicing Dissent offers a new approach to the study of disagreement that will appeal to social epistemologists and ethicists interested in this growing area of epistemology.

Power Dissent And Democracy by Deiric Ó Broin

Title Power Dissent and Democracy
Author Deiric Ó Broin
Publisher A. & A. Farmar
Release Date 2009
Category Civil society
Total Pages 182
ISBN 1906353093
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Dynamics Of Dissent by John Clammer

Title Dynamics of Dissent
Author John Clammer
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Release Date 2019-08-15
Category Political Science
Total Pages 178
ISBN 9781000044003
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book analyses dissent and its manifestations in movements of social and political transformation across communities and cultures. It shows how these movements create ruptures in the structures of power, and social hierarchy; expressed through songs, slogans, poetry and performances. The chapters in the book explore these sites of transgression and the imprint they leave on culture, politics, beliefs and the collective society – via music and poetry as in the Bhakti movement or through feministic theories born in post-World War Europe. It also explores how these dynamic movements generate alternate spaces within which the self, identity and collective purpose take new forms and find new meanings as they travel. This book will be of interest to students and scholars of the humanities, literature, history, sociology, politics and culture studies.

University Commons Divided by Peter MacKinnon

Title University Commons Divided
Author Peter MacKinnon
Publisher University of Toronto Press
Release Date 2018-01-18
Category Education
Total Pages 168
ISBN 9781487518554
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In recent years, a number of controversies have emerged from inside Canadian universities. While some of these controversies reflect debates occurring at a broader societal level, others are unique to the culture of universities and the way in which they are governed. In University Commons Divided, Peter MacKinnon provides close readings of a range of recent incidents with a view to exploring new challenges within universities and the extent to which the idea of the university as ‘commons,’ a site for open and contentious disagreement, may be under threat. Among the incidents addressed in this book are the Jennifer Berdahl case in which a UBC professor alleged a violation of her academic freedom when she was phoned by the university's board chair to discuss her blog on which she speculated about the reasons for the university president's departure from office; the case of Root Gorelick, a Carleton University biologist and member of the university’s board of governors who refused to sign a code of conduct preventing public discussion of internal board discussions; the Facebook scandal at Dalhousie University’s Faculty of Dentistry in which male students posted misogynistic comments about their female classmates. These and many other examples of turmoil in universities across the country are used to reach new insights on the state of freedom of expression and academic governance in the contemporary university. Accessibly written and perceptively argued, University Commons Divided is a timely and bold examination of the pressures seeking to transform the culture and governance of universities.