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Title Key Writers on Art The Twentieth Century
Author Chris Murray
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2005-06-27
Category Art
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9781134597208
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Key Writers on Art: The Twentieth Century offers a unique and authoritative guide to modern responses to art. Featuring 48 essays on the most important twentieth century writers and thinkers and written by an international panel of expert contributors, it introduces readers to key approaches and analytical tools used in the study of contemporary art. It discusses writers such as Adorno, Barthes, Benjamin, Freud, Greenberg, Heuser, Kristeva, Merleau-Ponty, Pollock, Read and Sontag.

Black On Black by John Cullen Gruesser

Title Black on Black
Author John Cullen Gruesser
Publisher University Press of Kentucky
Release Date 2015-01-13
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 216
ISBN 9780813158808
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Black on Black provides the first comprehensive analysis of the modern African American literary response to Africa, from W.E.B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk to Alice Walker's The Color Purple. Combining cutting-edge theory, extensive historical and archival research, and close readings of individual texts, Gruesser reveals the diversity of the African American response to Countee Cullen's question, "What is Africa to Me?" John Gruesser uses the concept of Ethiopianism--the biblically inspired belief that black Americans would someday lead Africans and people of the diaspora to a bright future--to provide a framework for his study. Originating in the eighteenth century and inspiring religious and political movements throughout the 1800s, Ethiopianism dominated African American depictions of Africa in the first two decades of the twentieth century, particularly in the writings of Du Bois, Sutton Griggs, and Pauline Hopkins. Beginning with the Harlem Renaissance and continuing through the Italian invasion and occupation of Ethiopia, however, its influence on the portrayal of the continent slowly diminished. Ethiopianism's decline can first be seen in the work of writers closely associated with the New Negro Movement, including Alain Locke and Langston Hughes, and continued in the dramatic work of Shirley Graham, the novels of George Schuyler, and the poetry and prose of Melvin Tolson. The final rejection of Ethiopianism came after the dawning of the Cold War and roughly coincided with the advent of postcolonial Africa in works by authors such as Richard Wright, Lorraine Hansberry, and Alice Walker.

Title North American Women Artists of the Twentieth Century
Author Jules Heller
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2013-12-19
Category Social Science
Total Pages 732
ISBN 9781135638894
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

First Published in 1997. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Title Racial Discourse and Cosmopolitanism in Twentieth Century African American Writing
Author Tania Friedel
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2010-06-21
Category History
Total Pages 214
ISBN 9781135893293
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book engages cosmopolitanism—a critical mode which moves beyond cultural pluralism by simultaneously privileging difference and commonality—in order to examine its particular deployment in the work of several African American writers. Deeply influenced and inspired by W. E. B. Du Bois, the writers closely examined in this study—Jean Toomer, Jessie Fauset, Langston Hughes and Albert Murray—have advanced cosmopolitanism to meet its own theoretical principals in the contested arena of racial discourse while remaining integral figures in a larger tradition of cosmopolitan thought. Rather than become mired in fixed categorical distinctions, their cosmopolitan perspective values the pluralist belief in the distinctiveness of different cultural groups while allowing for the possibility of inter-ethnic subjectivities, intercultural affiliations and change in any given mode of identification. This study advances cosmopolitanism as a useful model for like-minded critics and intellectuals today who struggle with contemporary debates regarding multiculturalism and universalism in a rapidly, yet unevenly, globalizing world.

Richard Wright by Keneth Kinnamon

Title Richard Wright
Author Keneth Kinnamon
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2014-11-04
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 499
ISBN 9781476609126
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

African-American writer Richard Wright (1908–1960) was celebrated during the early 1940s for his searing autobiography (Black Boy) and fiction (Native Son). By 1947 he felt so unwelcome in his homeland that he exiled himself and his family in Paris. But his writings changed American culture forever, and today they are mainstays of literature and composition classes. He and his works are also the subjects of numerous critical essays and commentaries by contemporary writers. This volume presents a comprehensive annotated bibliography of those essays, books, and articles from 1983 through 2003. Arranged alphabetically by author within years are some 8,320 entries ranging from unpublished dissertations to book-length studies of African American literature and literary criticism. Also included as an appendix are addenda to the author’s earlier bibliography covering the years from 1934 through 1982. This is the exhaustive reference for serious students of Richard Wright and his critics.

Title The Cambridge History of African American Literature
Author Maryemma Graham
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2011-02-03
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 847
ISBN 9780521872171
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A major new history of the literary traditions, oral and print, of African-descended peoples in the United States.

Along The Streets Of Bronzeville by Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach

Title Along the Streets of Bronzeville
Author Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 2012-09-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 192
ISBN 9780252095108
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Along the Streets of Bronzeville examines the flowering of African American creativity, activism, and scholarship in the South Side Chicago district known as Bronzeville during the period between the Harlem Renaissance in the 1920s and the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s. Poverty stricken, segregated, and bursting at the seams with migrants, Bronzeville was the community that provided inspiration, training, and work for an entire generation of diversely talented African American authors and artists who came of age during the years between the two world wars. In this significant recovery project, Elizabeth Schroeder Schlabach investigates the institutions and streetscapes of Black Chicago that fueled an entire literary and artistic movement. She argues that African American authors and artists--such as Gwendolyn Brooks, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, painter Archibald Motley, and many others--viewed and presented black reality from a specific geographic vantage point: the view along the streets of Bronzeville. Schlabach explores how the particular rhythms and scenes of daily life in Bronzeville locations, such as the State Street "Stroll" district or the bustling intersection of 47th Street and South Parkway, figured into the creative works and experiences of the artists and writers of the Black Chicago Renaissance.

Black Writers White Publishers by John Kevin Young

Title Black Writers White Publishers
Author John Kevin Young
Publisher Univ. Press of Mississippi
Release Date 2006
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 230
ISBN 9781604735499
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Jean Toomer's "Cane" was advertised as "a book about Negroes by a Negro," despite his request not to promote the book along such racial lines. Nella Larsen switched the title of her second novel from "Nig" to "Passing," because an editor felt the original title "might be too inflammatory." In order to publish his first novel as a Book-of-the-Month Club main selection Richard Wright deleted a scene in "Native Son" depicting Bigger Thomas masturbating. Toni Morrison changed the last word of "Beloved" at her editor's request and switched the title of "Paradise" from "War" to allay her publisher's marketing concerns. Although many editors place demands on their authors, these examples invite special scholarly attention given the power imbalance between white editors and publishers and African American authors. "Black Writers, White Publishers: Marketplace Politics in Twentieth-Century African American Literature" examines the complex negotiations behind the production of African American literature. In chapters on Larsen's "Passing," Ishmael Reed's "Mumbo Jumbo," Gwendolyn Brooks's "Children Coming Home," Morrison's "Oprah's Book Club" selections, and Ralph Ellison's "Juneteenth," John K. Young presents the first book-length application of editorial theory to African American literature. Focusing on the manuscripts, drafts, book covers, colophons, and advertisements that trace book production, Young expands upon the concept of socialized authorship and demonstrates how the study of publishing history and practice and African American literary criticism enrich each other. John K. Young is an associate professor of English at Marshall University. His work has appeared in journals such as "College English," "African American Review," and "Critique."

Title The Black Female Body in American Literature and Art
Author Caroline Brown
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2013-02-28
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 308
ISBN 9781136289194
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book examines how African-American writers and visual artists interweave icon and inscription in order to re-present the black female body, traditionally rendered alien and inarticulate within Western discursive and visual systems. Brown considers how the writings of Toni Morrison, Gayl Jones, Paule Marshall, Edwidge Danticat, Jamaica Kincaid, Andrea Lee, Gloria Naylor, and Martha Southgate are bound to such contemporary, postmodern visual artists as Lorna Simpson, Carrie Mae Weems, Kara Walker, Betye Saar, and Faith Ringgold. While the artists and authors rely on radically different media—photos, collage, video, and assembled objects, as opposed to words and rhythm—both sets of intellectual activists insist on the primacy of the black aesthetic. Both assert artistic agency and cultural continuity in the face of the oppression, social transformation, and cultural multiplicity of the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. This book examines how African-American performative practices mediate the tension between the ostensibly de-racialized body politic and the hyper-racialized black, female body, reimagining the cultural and political ground that guides various articulations of American national belonging. Brown shows how and why black women writers and artists matter as agents of change, how and why the form and content of their works must be recognized and reconsidered in the increasingly frenzied arena of cultural production and political debate.

Title Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance
Author Cary D. Wintz
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2012-12-06
Category Social Science
Total Pages 1392
ISBN 9781135455361
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the music of Louis Armstrong to the portraits by Beauford Delaney, the writings of Langston Hughes to the debut of the musical Show Boat, the Harlem Renaissance is one of the most significant developments in African-American history in the twentieth century. The Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance, in two-volumes and over 635 entries, is the first comprehensive compilation of information on all aspects of this creative, dynamic period. For a full list of entries, contributors, and more, visit the Encyclopedi a of Harlem Renaissance website.

Title Encyclopedia of the Harlem Renaissance A J
Author Cary D. Wintz
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Release Date 2004
Category African American arts
Total Pages 1341
ISBN 1579584578
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An interdisciplinary look at the Harlem Renaissance, it includes essays on the principal participants, those who defined the political, intellectual and cultural milieu in which the Renaissance existed; on important events and places.

Title Reference Books Bulletin
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1990
Category Reference books
Total Pages 86
ISBN UOM:39015064554275
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A compilation of evaluations appearing in Reference books bulletin (a section of the journal, Booklist)

Matter Magic And Spirit by David Murray

Title Matter Magic and Spirit
Author David Murray
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2013-04-23
Category Religion
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780812202878
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The spiritual and religious beliefs and practices of Native Americans and African Americans have long been sources of fascination and curiosity, owing to their marked difference from the religious traditions of white writers and researchers. Matter, Magic, and Spirit explores the ways religious and magical beliefs of Native Americans and African Americans have been represented in a range of discourses including anthropology, comparative religion, and literature. Though these beliefs were widely dismissed as primitive superstition and inferior to "higher" religions like Christianity, distinctions were still made between the supposed spiritual capacities of the different groups. David Murray's analysis is unique in bringing together Indian and African beliefs and their representations. First tracing the development of European ideas about both African fetishism and Native American "primitive belief," he goes on to explore the ways in which the hierarchies of race created by white Europeans coincided with hierarchies of religion as expressed in the developing study of comparative religion and folklore through the nineteenth century. Crucially this comparative approach to practices that were dismissed as conjure or black magic or Indian "medicine" points as well to the importance of their cultural and political roles in their own communities at times of destructive change. Murray also explores the ways in which Indian and African writers later reformulated the models developed by white observers, as demonstrated through the work of Charles Chesnutt and Simon Pokagon and then in the later conjunctions of modernism and ethnography in the 1920s and 1930s, through the work of Zora Neale Hurston, Zitkala Sa, and others. Later sections demonstrate how contemporary writers including Ishmael Reed and Leslie Silko deal with the revaluation of traditional beliefs as spiritual resources against a background of New Age spirituality and postmodern conceptions of racial and ethnic identity.

The Other Blacklist by Mary Washington

Title The Other Blacklist
Author Mary Washington
Publisher Columbia University Press
Release Date 2014-04-22
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780231152709
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Examines African American writers and artists of the 1950s, tracing leftist ideas and activism within their work, recounts the events of the 1959 Black Writers' Conference and explores the ongoing influence of the Black Popular Front.

Deans And Truants by Gene Andrew Jarrett

Title Deans and Truants
Author Gene Andrew Jarrett
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2007
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 223
ISBN 9780812239737
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For a work to be considered African American literature, does it need to focus on black characters or political themes? Must it represent these within a specific stylistic range? Or is it enough for the author to be identified as African American? In Deans and Truants, Gene Andrew Jarrett traces the shifting definitions of African American literature and the authors who wrote beyond those boundaries at the cost of critical dismissal and, at times, obscurity. From the late nineteenth century to the end of the twentieth, de facto deans--critics and authors as different as William Howells, Alain Locke, Richard Wright, and Amiri Baraka--prescribed the shifting parameters of realism and racial subject matter appropriate to authentic African American literature, while truant authors such as Paul Laurence Dunbar, George S. Schuyler, Frank Yerby, and Toni Morrison--perhaps the most celebrated African American author of the twentieth century--wrote literature anomalous to those standards. Jarrett explores the issues at stake when Howells, the "Dean of American Letters," argues in 1896 that only Dunbar's "entirely black verse," written in dialect, "would succeed." Three decades later, Locke, the cultural arbiter of the Harlem Renaissance, stands in contrast to Schuyler, a journalist and novelist who questions the existence of a peculiarly black or "New Negro" art. Next, Wright's 1937 blueprint for African American writing sets the terms of the Chicago Renaissance, but Yerby's version of historical romance approaches race and realism in alternative literary ways. Finally, Deans and Truants measures the gravitational pull of the late 1960s Black Aesthetic in Baraka's editorial silence on Toni Morrison's first and only short story, "Recitatif." Drawing from a wealth of biographical, historical, and literary sources, Deans and Truants describes the changing notions of race, politics, and gender that framed and were framed by the authors and critics of African American culture for more than a century.

Title Afro American Literature in the Twentieth Century
Author Michael G. Cooke
Publisher Yale University Press
Release Date 1984
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 241
ISBN 0300036248
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Examines works by African American writers

Calling The Wind by Clarence Major

Title Calling the Wind
Author Clarence Major
Publisher HarperCollins
Release Date 1993
Category Fiction
Total Pages 622
ISBN STANFORD:36105008721479
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Pivotal stories from post-slavery days through the Harlem Renaissance and into the nineties.

Title The Underground Railroad in African American Literature
Author Darcy Zabel
Publisher Peter Lang
Release Date 2004
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 229
ISBN 0820468169
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The (Underground) Railroad in African American Literature offers a brief history of the African American experience of the railroad and the uses of railroad history by a wide assortment of twentieth-century African American poets, dramatists, and fiction writers. Moreover, this literary history examines the ways in which trains, train history, and legendary train figures such as Harriet Tubman and John Henry have served as literary symbols. This repeated use of the train symbol and associated train people in twentieth-century African American literature creates a sense of literary continuity and a well-established aesthetic tradition all too frequently overlooked in many traditional approaches to the study of African American writing. The metaphoric possibilities associated with the railroad and the persistence of the train as a literary symbol in African American writing demonstrates the symbol's ongoing literary value for twentieth-century African American writers - writers who invite their readers to look back at the various points in history where America got off track, and who also dare to invite their readers to imagine an alternate route for the future.

Title The Wiley Blackwell Anthology of African American Literature Volume 2
Author Gene Andrew Jarrett
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Release Date 2014-01-13
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 1120
ISBN 9781118559505
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Wiley Blackwell Anthology of African American Literature is a comprehensive collection of poems, short stories, novellas, novels, plays, autobiographies, and essays authored by African Americans from the eighteenth century until the present. Evenly divided into two volumes, it is also the first such anthology to be conceived and published for both classroom and online education in the new millennium. Reflects the current scholarly and pedagogic structure of African American literary studies Selects literary texts according to extensive research on classroom adoptions, scholarship, and the expert opinions of leading professors Organizes literary texts according to more appropriate periods of literary history, dividing them into seven sections that accurately depict intellectual, cultural, and political movements Includes more reprints of entire works and longer selections of major works than any other anthology of its kind This second volume contains a comprehensive collection of texts authored by African Americans from the 1920s to the present The two volumes of this landmark anthology can also be bought as a set, at over 20% savings.

Race And The Modern Artist by Heather Hathaway

Title Race and the Modern Artist
Author Heather Hathaway
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2003-01-16
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 280
ISBN 0195352629
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Definitions of modernism have been debated throughout the twentieth century. But both during the height of the modernist era and since, little to no consideration has been given to the work of minority writers as part of this movement. Considering works by writers ranging from B.A. Botkin, T.S. Eliot, Waldo Frank, and Jean Toomer to Pedro Pietri and Allen Ginsberg, these essays examine the disputed relationships between modernity, modernism, and American cultural diversity. In so doing, the collection as a whole adds an important new dimension to our understanding of twentieth-century literature.