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Toxic Communities by Dorceta Taylor

Title Toxic Communities
Author Dorceta Taylor
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2014-06-20
Category Law
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781479861781
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From St. Louis to New Orleans, from Baltimore to Oklahoma City, there are poor and minority neighborhoods so beset by pollution that just living in them can be hazardous to your health. Due to entrenched segregation, zoning ordinances that privilege wealthier communities, or because businesses have found the ‘paths of least resistance,’ there are many hazardous waste and toxic facilities in these communities, leading residents to experience health and wellness problems on top of the race and class discrimination most already experience. Taking stock of the recent environmental justice scholarship, Toxic Communities examines the connections among residential segregation, zoning, and exposure to environmental hazards. Renowned environmental sociologist Dorceta Taylor focuses on the locations of hazardous facilities in low-income and minority communities and shows how they have been dumped on, contaminated and exposed. Drawing on an array of historical and contemporary case studies from across the country, Taylor explores controversies over racially-motivated decisions in zoning laws, eminent domain, government regulation (or lack thereof), and urban renewal. She provides a comprehensive overview of the debate over whether or not there is a link between environmental transgressions and discrimination, drawing a clear picture of the state of the environmental justice field today and where it is going. In doing so, she introduces new concepts and theories for understanding environmental racism that will be essential for environmental justice scholars. A fascinating landmark study, Toxic Communities greatly contributes to the study of race, the environment, and space in the contemporary United States.

Toxic Communities by Dorceta E. Taylor

Title Toxic Communities
Author Dorceta E. Taylor
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2014-01-01
Category Law
Total Pages 356
ISBN 9781479805150
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From St. Louis to New Orleans, from Baltimore to Oklahoma City, there are poor and minority neighborhoods so beset by pollution that just living in them can be hazardous to your health. Due to entrenched segregation, zoning ordinances that privilege wealthier communities, or because businesses have found the OCypaths of least resistance, OCO there are many hazardous waste and toxic facilities in these communities, leading residents to experience health and wellness problems on top of the race and class discrimination most already experience. Taking stock of the recent environmental justice scholarship, a Toxic Communities aexamines the connections among residential segregation, zoning, and exposure to environmental hazards. Renowned environmental sociologist Dorceta Taylor focuses on the locations of hazardous facilities in low-income and minority communities and shows how they have been dumped on, contaminated and exposed. Drawing on an array of historical and contemporary case studies from across the country, Taylor explores controversies over racially-motivated decisions in zoning laws, eminent domain, government regulation (or lack thereof), and urban renewal. She provides a comprehensive overview of the debate over whether or not there is a link between environmental transgressions and discrimination, drawing a clear picture of the state of the environmental justice field today and where it is going. In doing so, she introduces new concepts and theories for understanding environmental racism that will be essential for environmental justice scholars. A fascinating landmark study, a Toxic Communities agreatly contributes to the study of race, the environment, and space in the contemporary United States."

Toxic Communities by Dorceta Taylor

Title Toxic Communities
Author Dorceta Taylor
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2014-06-20
Category Law
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781479852390
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From St. Louis to New Orleans, from Baltimore to Oklahoma City, there are poor and minority neighborhoods so beset by pollution that just living in them can be hazardous to your health. Due to entrenched segregation, zoning ordinances that privilege wealthier communities, or because businesses have found the ‘paths of least resistance,’ there are many hazardous waste and toxic facilities in these communities, leading residents to experience health and wellness problems on top of the race and class discrimination most already experience. Taking stock of the recent environmental justice scholarship, Toxic Communities examines the connections among residential segregation, zoning, and exposure to environmental hazards. Renowned environmental sociologist Dorceta Taylor focuses on the locations of hazardous facilities in low-income and minority communities and shows how they have been dumped on, contaminated and exposed. Drawing on an array of historical and contemporary case studies from across the country, Taylor explores controversies over racially-motivated decisions in zoning laws, eminent domain, government regulation (or lack thereof), and urban renewal. She provides a comprehensive overview of the debate over whether or not there is a link between environmental transgressions and discrimination, drawing a clear picture of the state of the environmental justice field today and where it is going. In doing so, she introduces new concepts and theories for understanding environmental racism that will be essential for environmental justice scholars. A fascinating landmark study, Toxic Communities greatly contributes to the study of race, the environment, and space in the contemporary United States.

Toxic Communities by Dorceta Taylor

Title Toxic Communities
Author Dorceta Taylor
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2014-06-20
Category Social Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781479861620
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From St. Louis to New Orleans, from Baltimore to Oklahoma City, there are poor and minority neighborhoods so beset by pollution that just living in them can be hazardous to your health. Due to entrenched segregation, zoning ordinances that privilege wealthier communities, or because businesses have found the ‘paths of least resistance,’ there are many hazardous waste and toxic facilities in these communities, leading residents to experience health and wellness problems on top of the race and class discrimination most already experience. Taking stock of the recent environmental justice scholarship, Toxic Communities examines the connections among residential segregation, zoning, and exposure to environmental hazards. Renowned environmental sociologist Dorceta Taylor focuses on the locations of hazardous facilities in low-income and minority communities and shows how they have been dumped on, contaminated and exposed. Drawing on an array of historical and contemporary case studies from across the country, Taylor explores controversies over racially-motivated decisions in zoning laws, eminent domain, government regulation (or lack thereof), and urban renewal. She provides a comprehensive overview of the debate over whether or not there is a link between environmental transgressions and discrimination, drawing a clear picture of the state of the environmental justice field today and where it is going. In doing so, she introduces new concepts and theories for understanding environmental racism that will be essential for environmental justice scholars. A fascinating landmark study, Toxic Communities greatly contributes to the study of race, the environment, and space in the contemporary United States.

Contaminated Communities by Michael Edelstein

Title Contaminated Communities
Author Michael Edelstein
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2018-10-08
Category Social Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780429969942
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this wholly revised second edition, Michael Edelstein draws or iis thiffy years as a community activist tc provide a much-expanded theoretical foundation for understanding the psychosocial impacts of toxic contaminagtion. Informed by social psychological theory and an extensive survey of documented cases of toxic exposure, and enlivened by excerpts drawn from more than one thousand Interviews with victims, Contaminated Communities, Second Edition, presents, a candid portrayal of the toxic victim's experience and the key stages in the course of toxic disaster. The second edition introduces dozens of new cases and provvides expanded considerations of environmental justice, environmental racism, environmental turbulence, and environmental stigma, as well as a fully articulated theory of "lifescape." The new edition moves past the well-charted role of reactive environmentalism to explore issues for a proactivist approach that employs a "third path" of social learning, sustainable innovation, consensus building, and community empowerment.

Title Save Your City How Toxic Culture Kills Community What to Do about It
Author Diane Kalen-Sukra
Publisher Tellwell Talent
Release Date 2019-03-04
Category Political Science
Total Pages 178
ISBN 0228810876
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Toxic culture is eroding our sense of belonging, community and well-being. Our capacity to collaborate and innovate together is also being undermined by the rising incivility and divisiveness. We need each other to address the complex challenges facing our cities and communities--from the infrastructure deficit to climate change, homelessness, mental health and addiction issues. In order to thrive, our local democracies depend on our ability to revive the art of living and working well together. Save Your City author and veteran community builder Diane Kalen-Sukra, MA, CMC empowers community leaders and citizens to be part of the solution. She demonstrates what's involved by taking readers on a journey from Bullyville to Sustainaville, including an eye-opening visit to classical antiquity. The successful journey includes a renaissance of civic values and civic education as vital to fostering the type of culture that can sustain us, our democracy and our planet. REVIEWS: "Save Your City is an inspired and powerful must-read. Our democracy is in peril and this book delivers the right message, by the right person, at the right time." - IRA BASEN, radio producer, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC) "Save Your City is an absolute must-read for community builders. Diane Kalen-Sukra masterfully enlightens the challenges of modern governance with the wisdom of classical antiquity to address our increasingly uncivil society." - GEORGE B. CUFF, FCMC, author, management consultant, past president Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM) "For the love of community, read Save Your City. You will be taken on a journey that awakens your heart and our collective hope for a sustainable future." - SAM CHAISE, executive director, Christie Refugee Welcome Centre (Toronto) and former executive director, Canadian Baptist Ministries WORKBOOK & RESOURCES: Available at www.SaveYourCity.ca

No Safe Place by Phil Brown

Title No Safe Place
Author Phil Brown
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 1997-10-10
Category Health & Fitness
Total Pages 260
ISBN 9780520212480
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"An excellent and readable account of the toxic waste crisis in Woburn, Massachusetts, and the courageous efforts by local citizens to protect their community. The Woburn story is an inspiring lesson for citizens across the country struggling to protect the environment from polluters and unresponsive government officials."—Senator Edward Kennedy

Green Criminology by Michael J. Lynch

Title Green Criminology
Author Michael J. Lynch
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2017-08-22
Category Social Science
Total Pages 328
ISBN 9780520964228
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This groundbreaking text provides students with an overview and assessment of green criminology as well as a call to action. Green Criminology draws attention to the ways in which the political-economic organization of capitalism causes ecological destruction and disorganization. Focusing on real-world issues of green crime and environmental justice, chapters examine ecological withdrawals, ecological additions, toxic towns, wildlife poaching and trafficking, environmental laws, and nongovernmental environmental organizations. The book also presents an unintimidating introduction to research from the physical sciences on issues such as climate change, pollution levels, and the ecological footprint of humans, providing a truly interdisciplinary foundation for green criminological analysis. To help students succeed in the course—and to encourage them to see themselves as future green criminology researchers—the end-of-chapter study guides include: • Questions and Activities for Students that review topics students should be able to conceptualize and address. • Lessons for Researchers that suggest additional areas of research in the study of green crime.

Title Combatting Toxic Online Communities
Author Amie Jane Leavitt
Publisher The Rosen Publishing Group, Inc
Release Date 2016-07-15
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 64
ISBN 9781508171126
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Today, we can find an online community to suit almost any interest we may have. And yet these communities carry an element of menace. The anonymity associated with online communities allows particularly vicious interplay, where people can pile on others with virtually zero consequences. Using current examples from the news and connecting this phenomenon to historical incidents like the Salem witch trials, this fascinating resource examines an interesting time in the world and grounds it with practical guidelines for being a responsible member of an online community.

Sacrifice Zones by Steve Lerner

Title Sacrifice Zones
Author Steve Lerner
Publisher MIT Press
Release Date 2012-09-21
Category Science
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9780262288743
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The stories of residents of low-income communities across the country who took action when pollution from heavy industry contaminated their towns. Across the United States, thousands of people, most of them in low-income or minority communities, live next to heavily polluting industrial sites. Many of them reach a point at which they say “Enough is enough.” After living for years with poisoned air and water, contaminated soil, and pollution-related health problems, they start to take action—organizing, speaking up, documenting the effects of pollution on their neighborhoods. In Sacrifice Zones, Steve Lerner tells the stories of twelve communities, from Brooklyn to Pensacola, that rose up to fight the industries and military bases causing disproportionately high levels of chemical pollution. He calls these low-income neighborhoods “sacrifice zones.” And he argues that residents of these sacrifice zones, tainted with chemical pollutants, need additional regulatory protections. Sacrifice Zones goes beyond the disheartening statistics and gives us the voices of the residents themselves, offering compelling portraits of accidental activists who have become grassroots leaders in the struggle for environmental justice and details the successful tactics they have used on the fenceline with heavy industry.

Inevitably Toxic by Brinda Sarathy

Title Inevitably Toxic
Author Brinda Sarathy
Publisher University of Pittsburgh Press
Release Date 2018-10-16
Category Science
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9780822986232
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Not a day goes by that humans aren’t exposed to toxins in our environment—be it at home, in the car, or workplace. But what about those toxic places and items that aren’t marked? Why are we warned about some toxic spaces' substances and not others? The essays in Inevitably Toxic consider the exposure of bodies in the United States, Canada and Japan to radiation, industrial waste, and pesticides. Research shows that appeals to uncertainty have led to social inaction even when evidence, e.g. the link between carbon emissions and global warming, stares us in the face. In some cases, influential scientists, engineers and doctors have deliberately "manufactured doubt" and uncertainty but as the essays in this collection show, there is often no deliberate deception. We tend to think that if we can’t see contamination and experts deem it safe, then we are okay. Yet, having knowledge about the uncertainty behind expert claims can awaken us from a false sense of security and alert us to decisions and practices that may in fact cause harm.

Toxic Nation by Fred Setterberg

Title Toxic Nation
Author Fred Setterberg
Publisher Jossey-Bass
Release Date 1993-08-10
Category Nature
Total Pages 301
ISBN STANFORD:36105006046531
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Looks at communities where grass roots movements have started to oppose the use of pesticides and the development of unsafe toxic waste sites

Title Combatting Shaming and Toxic Communities
Author Various
Publisher Rosen Young Adult
Release Date 2016-07-15
Category
Total Pages 64
ISBN 1477785450
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The emergence of the Internet and social media has made it easier than ever to be part of a community. But what happens when those communities turn toxic? The anonymity and viral nature of modern technology can sometimes turn individuals into a target, a single comment or photo can now draw the judgment or ire of thousands within the Internet community. This series examines the various types of shaming in today's society and offers guidance about how to deal with them by examining up-to-date and well-known instances of social shaming and ostracism.

Communities In Action by National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine

Title Communities in Action
Author National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
Publisher National Academies Press
Release Date 2017-04-27
Category Medical
Total Pages 582
ISBN 9780309452960
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the United States, some populations suffer from far greater disparities in health than others. Those disparities are caused not only by fundamental differences in health status across segments of the population, but also because of inequities in factors that impact health status, so-called determinants of health. Only part of an individual's health status depends on his or her behavior and choice; community-wide problems like poverty, unemployment, poor education, inadequate housing, poor public transportation, interpersonal violence, and decaying neighborhoods also contribute to health inequities, as well as the historic and ongoing interplay of structures, policies, and norms that shape lives. When these factors are not optimal in a community, it does not mean they are intractable: such inequities can be mitigated by social policies that can shape health in powerful ways. Communities in Action: Pathways to Health Equity seeks to delineate the causes of and the solutions to health inequities in the United States. This report focuses on what communities can do to promote health equity, what actions are needed by the many and varied stakeholders that are part of communities or support them, as well as the root causes and structural barriers that need to be overcome.

Baptized In Pcbs by Ellen Griffith Spears

Title Baptized in PCBs
Author Ellen Griffith Spears
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2014
Category History
Total Pages 440
ISBN 9781469611716
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Baptized in PCBs: Race, Pollution, and Justice in an All-American Town

Toxic Truths by Thom Davies

Title Toxic truths
Author Thom Davies
Publisher Manchester University Press
Release Date 2020-07-14
Category Political Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781526137012
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This electronic version has been made available under a Creative Commons (BY-NC-ND) open access license. Debates over science, facts, and values are pivotal in the struggle for environmental justice. For decades, environmental justice activists have campaigned against the misuse of science, engaging in community-led citizen science that champions knowledge produced by and for ordinary people living with environmental risks and hazards. However, post-truth politics have threatened science itself. Toxic truths examines the relationship between environmental justice and citizen science, focusing on enduring issues and new challenges in a post-truth age. The volume features a range of community-based participatory environmental health and justice research projects that seek to establish different ways of sensing, witnessing, and interpreting environmental injustice. From struggles in American hog country and contaminated indigenous communities, to local environmental controversies in Spain and China, this volume examines political strategies for seeking environmental justice. With international, interdisciplinary contributions from distinguished authors, emerging scholars and community activists, Toxic truths is essential reading for those seeking to understand the cutting edge of citizen science and activism around the world.

Toxic Town by Peter C. Little

Title Toxic Town
Author Peter C. Little
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2014-03-14
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9780814770924
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1924, IBM built its first plant in Endicott, New York. Now, Endicott is a contested toxic waste site. With its landscape thoroughly contaminated by carcinogens, Endicott is the subject of one of the nation’s largest corporate-state mitigation efforts. Yet despite the efforts of IBM and the U.S. government, Endicott residents remain skeptical that the mitigation systems employed were designed with their best interests at heart. In Toxic Town, Peter C. Little tracks and critically diagnoses the experiences of Endicott residents as they learn to live with high-tech pollution, community transformation, scientific expertise, corporate-state power, and risk mitigation technologies. By weaving together the insights of anthropology, political ecology, disaster studies, and science and technology studies, the book explores questions of theoretical and practical import for understanding the politics of risk and the ironies of technological disaster response in a time when IBM’s stated mission is to build a “Smarter Planet.” Little critically reflects on IBM’s new corporate tagline, arguing for a political ecology of corporate social and environmental responsibility and accountability that places the social and environmental politics of risk mitigation front and center. Ultimately, Little argues that we will need much more than hollow corporate taglines, claims of corporate responsibility, and attempts to mitigate high-tech disasters to truly build a smarter planet.

Title The Environment and the People in American Cities 1600s 1900s
Author Dorceta E. Taylor
Publisher Duke University Press
Release Date 2009-11-23
Category Science
Total Pages 639
ISBN 9780822392248
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In The Environment and the People in American Cities, Dorceta E. Taylor provides an in-depth examination of the development of urban environments, and urban environmentalism, in the United States. Taylor focuses on the evolution of the city, the emergence of elite reformers, the framing of environmental problems, and the perceptions of and responses to breakdowns in social order, from the seventeenth century through the twentieth. She demonstrates how social inequalities repeatedly informed the adjudication of questions related to health, safety, and land access and use. While many accounts of environmental history begin and end with wildlife and wilderness, Taylor shows that the city offers important clues to understanding the evolution of American environmental activism. Taylor traces the progression of several major thrusts in urban environmental activism, including the alleviation of poverty; sanitary reform and public health; safe, affordable, and adequate housing; parks, playgrounds, and open space; occupational health and safety; consumer protection (food and product safety); and land use and urban planning. At the same time, she presents a historical analysis of the ways race, class, and gender shaped experiences and perceptions of the environment as well as environmental activism and the construction of environmental discourses. Throughout her analysis, Taylor illuminates connections between the social and environmental conflicts of the past and those of the present. She describes the displacement of people of color for the production of natural open space for the white and wealthy, the close proximity between garbage and communities of color in early America, the cozy relationship between middle-class environmentalists and the business community, and the continuous resistance against environmental inequalities on the part of ordinary residents from marginal communities.

Title Environmentalism and Economic Justice
Author Laura Pulido
Publisher University of Arizona Press
Release Date 1996-02
Category Political Science
Total Pages 282
ISBN 0816516057
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Ecological causes are championed not only by lobbyists or hikers. While mainstream environmentalism is usually characterized by well-financed, highly structured organizations operating on a national scale, campaigns for environmental justice are often fought by poor or minority communities. Environmentalism and Economic Justice is one of the first books devoted to Chicano environmental issues and is a study of U.S. environmentalism in transition as seen through the contributions of people of color. It elucidates the various forces driving and shaping two important examples of environmental organizing: the 1965-71 pesticide campaign of the United Farm Workers and a grazing conflict between a Hispano cooperative and mainstream environmentalists in northern New Mexico. The UFW example is one of workers highly marginalized by racism, whose struggle--as much for identity as for a union contract--resulted in boycotts of produce at the national level. The case of the grazing cooperative Ganados del Valle, which sought access to land set aside for elk hunting, represents a subaltern group fighting the elitism of natural resource policy in an effort to pursue a pastoral lifestyle. In both instances Pulido details the ways in which racism and economic subordination create subaltern communities, and shows how these groups use available resources to mobilize and improve their social, economic, and environmental conditions. Environmentalism and Economic Justice reveals that the environmental struggles of Chicano communities do not fit the mold of mainstream environmentalism, as they combine economic, identity, and quality-of-life issues. Examination of the forces that create and shape these grassroots movements clearly demonstrates that environmentalism needs to be sensitive to local issues, economically empowering, and respectful of ethnic and cultural diversity.

Contaminated Communities by Michael R Edelstein

Title Contaminated Communities
Author Michael R Edelstein
Publisher Westview Press
Release Date 1989-03-23
Category Science
Total Pages 240
ISBN 0813376572
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary: