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Theorizing The Standoff by Robin Wagner-Pacifici

Title Theorizing the Standoff
Author Robin Wagner-Pacifici
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2000-03-28
Category Social Science
Total Pages 276
ISBN 0521654793
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Theoretical analysis and real life case studies are combined to explore the nature of the standoff.

Title When All Roads Lead to the Standoff
Author Jeanne M. Haskin
Publisher Algora Publishing
Release Date 2016-02-01
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 238
ISBN 9781628941883
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Using eye-witness accounts to narrate the terrifying, failed efforts at communication during the standoffs at Ruby Ridge and in Waco, TX, Haskin offers a psycho-social theory for militant white movements influenced by political economics. The heart-stopping dialogues as the authorities in both cases make their erroneous calculations are dramatic, but so is the idea that such events can furnish essential clues to success for those who are responsible for de-fusing such conflicts. The Ruby Ridge standoff and the Branch Davidian siege were symptoms of a broader battle between the goals of Corporate Governance and the hatred of white supremacists. Haskin show that by instilling insecurity, the Corporate power makes a mockery of citizens' free will. Bred by a different set of goals and grievances, white supremacists would use and sacrifice anyone (whites included) to achieve their "whites-only" world. What if white supremacists and those who favor Corporate Governance find common ground? The worst of both their goals--grotesque levels of deprivation, debt peonage, survival slavery, ethnic cleansing, and racial and religious violence--may be our future.

Title Cultural Trauma and Collective Identity
Author Jeffrey C. Alexander
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2004-03-22
Category Political Science
Total Pages 314
ISBN 9780520235953
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"A timely and sophisticated series of studies. Articulating diverse strands of social theory with the historical episodes that have had major affective resonances within national cultures, the volume as a whole contributes significantly to our understanding of relationships between collective affect and social process."—Michael Shapiro, Professor of Political Science at the University of Hawaii "The fine and deeply argued essays in this book build a strong case against a naturalistic theory of collective traumas. Traumas are made, not born, claim the authors. And they brilliantly cast a steely gaze on several social nightmares--the Nazi holocaust, slavery in the United States, September 11, 2001--in order to limn the social and cultural processes by which events come to be viewed as threatening to the very identity of collectivities. Ultimately this is a book about the nature of the very normative order that gives meaning to the human condition."—Robin Wagner-Pacifici, author of Theorizing the Standoff "Near the end of the 20th century, scholarly interest in collective memory surged, spurred on both by re-examinations of the Holocaust and other canonical sources of trauma, and by the rise of a new set of institutionalized processes of collective memory-work. It is the great merit of these essays to approach the problems of collective trauma in sociological terms, as theorizable patterns in socially and culturally organized processes. This is a vital corrective to more naturalistic understandings and complement to those focused more narrowly on psychology or textual analysis."—Craig Calhoun, President, Social Science Research Council "This interactive collection of essays breaks new ground in the sociology of trauma. With its rich range of empirical cases, this book will inspire new debates across the social sciences about memory, collective suffering, and coping."—Arjun Appadurai, Professor of International Studies, Yale University

A Theory Of Fields by Neil Fligstein

Title A Theory of Fields
Author Neil Fligstein
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2015-04
Category Social Science
Total Pages 238
ISBN 9780190241452
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Finding ways to understand the nature of social change and social order-from political movements to market meltdowns-is one of the enduring problems of social science.A Theory of Fields draws together far-ranging insights from social movement theory, organizational theory, and economic and political sociology to construct a general theory of social organization and strategic action. In a work of remarkable synthesis, imagination, and analysis, Neil Fligstein and Doug McAdam propose that social change and social order can be understood through what they call strategic action fields. They posit that these fields are the general building blocks of political and economic life, civil society, and the state, and the fundamental form of order in our world today. Similar to Russian dolls, they are nested and connected in a broader environment of almost countless proximate and overlapping fields. Fields are mutually dependent; change in one often triggers change in another. At the core of the theory is an account of how social actors fashion and maintain order in a given field. This sociological theory of action, what they call "social skill," helps explain what individuals do in strategic action fields to gain cooperation or engage in competition. To demonstrate the breadth of the theory, Fligstein and McAdam make its abstract principles concrete through extended case studies of the Civil Rights Movement and the rise and fall of the market for mortgages in the U.S. since the 1960s. The book also provides a "how-to" guide to help others implement the approach and discusses methodological issues. With a bold new approach, A Theory of Fields offers both a rigorous and practically applicable way of thinking through and making sense of social order and change-and how one emerges from the other-in modern, complex societies.

Title The New Blackwell Companion to Social Theory
Author Bryan S. Turner
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Release Date 2016-09-26
Category Social Science
Total Pages 640
ISBN 9781119250746
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A comprehensive new collection covering the principal traditions and critical contemporary issues of social theory. Builds on the success of The Blackwell Companion to Social Theory, second edition with substantial revisions, entirely new contributions, and a fresh editorial direction Explores contemporary areas such as actor network theory, social constructionism, human rights and cosmopolitanism Includes chapters on demography, science and technology studies, and genetics and social theory Emphasizes key areas of sociology which have had an important impact in shaping the discipline as a whole

Generally Speaking by Eviatar Zerubavel

Title Generally Speaking
Author Eviatar Zerubavel
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2020-10-26
Category Social Science
Total Pages 216
ISBN 9780197519295
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this invitation to "concept-driven" sociology, defying the conventional split between "theory" and "methodology" (as well as between "quantitative" and "qualitative" research), Eviatar Zerubavel introduces a yet unarticulated "Simmelian" method of theorizing specifically designed to reveal fundamental, often hidden social patterns. Insisting that it can actually be taught, he examines the theoretico-methodological process (revolving around the epistemic and analytical acts of focusing, generalizing, "exampling," and analogizing) by which concept-driven researchers can distill generic social patterns from the culturally, historically, and domain-specific contexts in which they encounter them empirically. Disregarding conventionally noted substantive variability in order to uncover conventionally disregarded formal commonalities, Generally Speaking draws on cross-cultural, cross-historical, cross-domain, and cross-level analogies in an effort to reveal formal parallels across disparate contexts. Using numerous examples from culturally and historically diverse contexts and a wide range of social domains while also disregarding scale, Zerubavel thus introduces a pronouncedly transcontextual "generic" sociology.

Time Maps by Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor of Sociology Eviatar Zerubavel

Title Time Maps
Author Board of Governors and Distinguished Professor of Sociology Eviatar Zerubavel
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2003-05-15
Category History
Total Pages 180
ISBN 0226981525
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Time Maps extends beyond all of the old clichés about linear, circular, and spiral patterns of historical process and provides us with models of the actual legends used to map history. It is a brilliant and elegant exercise in model building that provides new insights into some of the old questions about philosophy of history, historical narrative, and what is called straight history."-Hayden White, University of California, Santa Cruz Who were the first people to inhabit North America? Does the West Bank belong to the Arabs or the Jews? Why are racists so obsessed with origins? Is a seventh cousin still a cousin? Why do some societies name their children after dead ancestors? As Eviatar Zerubavel demonstrates in Time Maps, we cannot answer burning questions such as these without a deeper understanding of how we envision the past. In a pioneering attempt to map the structure of our collective memory, Zerubavel considers the cognitive patterns we use to organize the past in our minds and the mental strategies that help us string together unrelated events into coherent and meaningful narratives, as well as the social grammar of battles over conflicting interpretations of history. Drawing on fascinating examples that range from Hiroshima to the Holocaust, from Columbus to Lucy, and from ancient Egypt to the former Yugoslavia, Zerubavel shows how we construct historical origins; how we tie discontinuous events together into stories; how we link families and entire nations through genealogies; and how we separate distinct historical periods from one another through watersheds, such as the invention of fire or the fall of the Berlin Wall. Most people think the Roman Empire ended in 476, even though it lasted another 977 years in Byzantium. Challenging such conventional wisdom, Time Maps will be must reading for anyone interested in how the history of our world takes shape.

The Art Of Surrender by Robin Wagner-Pacifici

Title The Art of Surrender
Author Robin Wagner-Pacifici
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2005-10-03
Category History
Total Pages 210
ISBN 0226869784
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Explores the ritual concessions as acts of warfare, performances of submission, demonstrations of power, and representations of shifting, unstable worlds. The author considers the limits of sovereignty at conflict's end, showing how the ways we concede loss can be as important as the ways we claim victory.

Performance And Power by Jeffrey C. Alexander

Title Performance and Power
Author Jeffrey C. Alexander
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Release Date 2013-08-26
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9780745655666
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Performativity has emerged as a critical new idea across the humanities and social sciences, from literary and cultural studies to the study of gender and the philosophy of action. In this volume, Jeffrey Alexander demonstrates how performance can reorient our study of politics and society. Alexander develops a cultural pragmatics that shifts cultural sociology from texts to gestural meanings. Positioning social performance between ritual and strategy, he lays out the elements of social performance - from scripts to mise-en-scène, from critical mediation to audience reception - and systematically describes their tense interrelation. This is followed by a series of empirically oriented studies that demonstrate how cultural pragmatics transforms our approach to power. Alexander brings his new theory of social performance to bear on case studies that range from political to cultural power: Barack Obama's electoral campaign, American failure in the Iraqi war, the triumph of the Civil Rights Movement, terrorist violence on September 11th, public intellectuals, material icons, and social science itself. This path-breaking work by one of the world's leading social theorists will command a wide interdisciplinary readership.

Cults Religion And Violence by Professor of Sociology and Anthropology David G Bromley

Title Cults Religion and Violence
Author Professor of Sociology and Anthropology David G Bromley
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2002-05-13
Category Religion
Total Pages 249
ISBN 0521668980
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Explores recent high profile cases of new religious movements involved in violence.

Title The SAGE Handbook of Social Network Analysis
Author John Scott
Publisher SAGE
Release Date 2011-05-18
Category Social Science
Total Pages 640
ISBN 9781446250112
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This sparkling Handbook offers an unrivalled resource for those engaged in the cutting edge field of social network analysis. Systematically, it introduces readers to the key concepts, substantive topics, central methods and prime debates. Among the specific areas covered are: Network theory Interdisciplinary applications Online networks Corporate networks Lobbying networks Deviant networks Measuring devices Key Methodologies Software applications. The result is a peerless resource for teachers and students which offers a critical survey of the origins, basic issues and major debates. The Handbook provides a one-stop guide that will be used by readers for decades to come.

Violence by Randall Collins

Title Violence
Author Randall Collins
Publisher Greenwood Publishing Group
Release Date 2009-08-23
Category Social Science
Total Pages 584
ISBN 9780691143224
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

It is the popular misconception fostered by action movies and thrillers, not to mention social scientists, that violence is natural under certain conditions. Collins challenges this view, arguing that violent confrontation goes against human physiological hardwiring, regardless of the underlying conditions and motivations.

The Dubious Case Of A Failed Coup by Feride Çiçekoğlu

Title The Dubious Case of a Failed Coup
Author Feride Çiçekoğlu
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2018-09-18
Category Political Science
Total Pages 246
ISBN 9789811311413
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This volume is an attempt to contextualise the coup attempt of 15 July 2016 in Turkey, within the framework of militarism and masculinities. The immediate aftermath of the 15 July in Turkey witnessed confusion, contestation and negotiation among different narratives, until a hegemonic version was superimposed on the collective memory as part of official history building. This project is an attempt to bring a fresh and critical perspective by compiling together analyses from various disciplines of political science, media and film studies, literature, sociology and cultural studies. Several chapters of this volume delineate the paradox of “victorious militarism,” meaning that despite the failure of the coup, its aftermath has been shaped by a new wave of state-sponsored gendered militarism, with the establishment of a regime of “state of emergency.”

Title Anthropologists and Their Traditions Across National Borders
Author Regna Darnell
Publisher U of Nebraska Press
Release Date 2014-11-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 296
ISBN 9780803256873
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Volume 8 of the Histories of Anthropology Annual series, the premier series published in the history of the discipline, explores national anthropological traditions in Britain, the United States, and Europe and follows them into postnational contexts. Contributors reassess the major theorists in twentieth-century anthropology, including the work of luminaries such as Franz Boas, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Bronisław Malinowski, A. R. Radcliffe-Brown, and Marshall Sahlins, as well as lesser-known but important anthropological work by Berthold Laufer, A. M. Hocart, Kenelm O. L. Burridge, and Robin Ridington, among others. These essays examine myriad themes such as the pedagogical context of the anthropologist as a teller of stories about indigenous storytellers; the colonial context of British anthropological theory and its projects outside the nation-state; the legacies of Claude Lévi-Strauss’s structuralism regarding culture- specific patterns; cognitive universals reflected in empirical examples of kinship, myth, language, classificatory systems, and supposed universal mental structures; and the career of Marshall Sahlins and his trajectory from neo-evolutionism and structuralism toward an epistemological skepticism of cross- cultural miscommunication.

Title Handbook of Qualitative Organizational Research
Author Kimberly D. Elsbach
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2015-11-19
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 520
ISBN 9781317908784
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This handbook provides a comprehensive overview of state-of-the-art, innovative approaches to qualitative research for organizational scholars. Individual chapters in each area are written by experts in a variety of fields, who have contributed some of the most innovative studies themselves in recent years. An indispensable reference guide to anyone conducting high-impact organizational research, this handbook includes innovative approaches to research problems, data collection, data analysis and interpretation, and application of research findings. The book will be of interest to scholars and graduate students in a wide variety of disciplines, including anthropology, organizational behavior, organizational theory, social psychology, and sociology

Title Encyclopedia of Violence Peace and Conflict
Author Anonim
Publisher Academic Press
Release Date 2008-09-05
Category Social Science
Total Pages 2750
ISBN 0123739853
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The 2nd edition of Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace and Conflict provides timely and useful information about antagonism and reconciliation in all contexts of public and personal life. Building on the highly-regarded 1st edition (1999), and publishing at a time of seemingly inexorably increasing conflict and violent behaviour the world over, the Encyclopedia is an essential reference for students and scholars working in the field of peace and conflict resolution studies, and for those seeking to explore alternatives to violence and share visions and strategies for social justice and social change. Covering topics as diverse as Arms Control, Peace Movements, Child Abuse, Folklore, Terrorism and Political Assassinations, the Encyclopedia comprehensively addresses an extensive information area in 225 multi-disciplinary, cross-referenced and authoritatively authored articles. In his Preface to the 1st edition, Editor-in-Chief Lester Kurtz wrote: "The problem of violence poses such a monumental challenge at the end of the 20th century that it is surprising we have addressed it so inadequately. We have not made much progress in learning how to cooperate with one another more effectively or how to conduct our conflicts more peacefully. Instead, we have increased the lethality of our combat through revolutions in weapons technology and military training. The Encyclopedia of Violence, Peace, and Conflict is designed to help us to take stock of our knowledge concerning these crucial phenomena." Ten years on, the need for an authoritative and cross-disciplinary approach to the great issues of violence and peace seems greater than ever. More than 200 authoritative multidisciplinary articles in a 3-volume set Many brand-new articles alongside revised and updated content from the First Edition Article outline and glossary of key terms at the beginning of each article Entries arranged alphabetically for easy access Articles written by more than 200 eminent contributors from around the world

It Was Like A Fever by Francesca Polletta

Title It Was Like a Fever
Author Francesca Polletta
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2009-01-14
Category Social Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780226673776
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Activists and politicians have long recognized the power of a good story to move people to action. In early 1960 four black college students sat down at a whites-only lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, and refused to leave. Within a month sit-ins spread to thirty cities in seven states. Student participants told stories of impulsive, spontaneous action—this despite all the planning that had gone into the sit-ins. “It was like a fever,” they said. Francesca Polletta’s It Was Like a Fever sets out to account for the power of storytelling in mobilizing political and social movements. Drawing on cases ranging from sixteenth-century tax revolts to contemporary debates about the future of the World Trade Center site, Polletta argues that stories are politically effective not when they have clear moral messages, but when they have complex, often ambiguous ones. The openness of stories to interpretation has allowed disadvantaged groups, in particular, to gain a hearing for new needs and to forge surprising political alliances. But popular beliefs in America about storytelling as a genre have also hurt those challenging the status quo. A rich analysis of storytelling in courtrooms, newsrooms, public forums, and the United States Congress, It Was Like a Fever offers provocative new insights into the dynamics of culture and contention.

Social Performance by Jeffrey C. Alexander

Title Social Performance
Author Jeffrey C. Alexander
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2006-05-04
Category Social Science
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781139452670
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Jeffrey C. Alexander brings together new and leading contributors to make a powerful and coherently argued case for a new direction in cultural sociology, one that focuses on the intersection between performance, ritual and social action. Performance has always been used by sociologists to understand the social world but this volume offers the first systematic analytical framework based on the performance metaphor to explain large-scale social and cultural processes. From September 11, to the Clinton/Lewinsky affair, to the role of the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Social Performance draws on recent work in performative theory in the humanities and in cultural studies to offer a novel approach to the sociology of culture. Inspired by the theories of Austin, Derrida, Durkheim, Goffman, and Turner, this is a path-breaking volume that makes a major contribution to the field. It will appeal to scholars and students alike.

Trump S Media War by Catherine Happer

Title Trump s Media War
Author Catherine Happer
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2018-10-17
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9783319940694
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The election of Donald Trump as US President in 2016 seemed to catch the world napping. Like the vote for Brexit in the UK, there seemed to be a new de-synchronicity – a huge reality gap – between the unfolding of history and the mainstream news media’s interpretations of and reporting of contemporary events. Through a series of short, sharp interventions from academics and journalists, this book interrogates the emergent media war around Donald Trump. A series of interconnected themes are used to set an agenda for exploration of Trump as the lynch-pin in the fall of the liberal mainstream and the rise of the right media mainstream in the USA. By exploring topics such as Trump’s television celebrity, his presidential candidacy and data-driven election campaign, his use of social media, his press conferences and combative relationship with the mainstream media, and the question of ‘fake news’ and his administration’s defence of ‘alternative facts’, the contributors rally together to map the parallels of the seemingly momentous and continuing shifts in the wider relationship between media and politics.

Apocalypse Observed by John R. Hall

Title Apocalypse Observed
Author John R. Hall
Publisher Psychology Press
Release Date 2000
Category Religion
Total Pages 228
ISBN 0415192765
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Apocalypse Observed is about religious violence. By analyzing five of the most notorious cults of recent years, the authors present a fascinating and revealing account of religious sects and conflict. Cults covered include: * the apocalypse at Jonestown * the Branch Davidians at Waco * the violent path of Aum Shinrikyo * the mystical apocalypse of the Solar Temple * the mass suicide of Heaven's Gate. Through comparative case studies and in-depth analysis, the authors show how religious violence can erupt not simply from the beliefs of the cult followers or the personalities of their leaders, but also from the way in which society responds to the cults in its midst.