Download The Origins Of The Boxer Uprising Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online The Origins Of The Boxer Uprising full books anytime and anywhere. Click download or read online button and get unlimited access by create free account.

The Origins Of The Boxer Uprising by Joseph W. Esherick

Title The Origins of the Boxer Uprising
Author Joseph W. Esherick
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 1988-08-18
Category History
Total Pages 410
ISBN 0520908961
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In the summer of 1900, bands of peasant youths from the villages of north China streamed into Beijing to besiege the foreign legations, attracting the attention of the entire world. Joseph Esherick reconstructs the early history of the Boxers, challenging the traditional view that they grew from earlier anti-dynastic sects, and stressing instead the impact of social ecology and popular culture.

Title The Boxer Rebellion and the Great Game in China
Author David J. Silbey
Publisher Hill and Wang
Release Date 2012-03-27
Category History
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781429942577
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The year is 1900, and Western empires—both old and new—are locked in regional entanglements across the globe. The British are losing a bitter war against the Boers while the German kaiser is busy building a vast new navy. The United States is struggling to put down an insurgency in the South Pacific while the upstart imperialist Japan begins to make clear to neighboring Russia its territorial ambition. In China, a perennial pawn in the Great Game, a mysterious group of superstitious peasants is launching attacks on the Western powers they fear are corrupting their country. These ordinary Chinese—called Boxers by the West because of their martial arts showmanship—rise up, seemingly out of nowhere. Foreshadowing the insurgencies of the more recent past, they lack a centralized leadership and instead tap into latent nationalism and deep economic frustration to build their army. Their battle cry: "Support the Qing, exterminate the foreigners." Many scholars brush off the Boxers as an ill-conceived and easily defeated revolt, but the military historian David J. Silbey shows just how close they came to beating back the combined might of all the imperial powers. Drawing on the diaries and letters of allied soldiers and diplomats, Silbey paints a vivid portrait of the short-lived war. Even though their cause ended just as quickly as it began, the bravery and patriotism of the Boxers would inspire Chinese nationalists—including a young Mao Zedong—for decades to come.

History In Three Keys by Paul A. Cohen

Title History in Three Keys
Author Paul A. Cohen
Publisher Columbia University Press
Release Date 1997
Category History
Total Pages 428
ISBN 0231106505
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Part Two explores the thought, feelings, and behavior of the direct participants in the Boxer experience, individuals who, without a preconceived idea of the entire event, understood what was happening to them in a manner fundamentally different from historians.

The Boxer Rebellion by Christopher Martin

Title The Boxer Rebellion
Author Christopher Martin
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1968
Category China
Total Pages 175
ISBN UOM:39015013966521
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The Boxer Rebellion by Diana Preston

Title The Boxer Rebellion
Author Diana Preston
Publisher Berkley Publishing Group
Release Date 2001
Category History
Total Pages 436
ISBN 0425180840
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Portrays the dramatic human experience of the Boxer Rebellion from both a Western and Chinese perspective, drawing on diaries, memoirs, and letters of those that lived through this pivotal time in the history of China. Reprint.

The Boxers China And The World by Robert A. Bickers

Title The Boxers China and the World
Author Robert A. Bickers
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield
Release Date 2007
Category History
Total Pages 231
ISBN 0742553957
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In 1900, China chose to take on imperialism by fighting a war with the world on the parched north China plain. This multidisciplinary volume explores the causes behind what is now known as the Boxer War, examining its particular cruelties and its impact on China, foreign imperialism in China, and on the foreign imagination. This war introduced the world to the "Boxers," the seemingly fanatical, violent xenophobes who, believing themselves invulnerable to foreign bullets, died in their thousands in front of foreign guns. But 1900 also saw the imperialism of the 1890s checked and the Qing rulers of China move to embark on a series of shattering reforms. The Boxers have often been represented as a force from China's past, resisting an enforced modernity. Here, expert contributors argue that this rebellion was instead a wholly modern resistance to globalizing power, representing new trends in modern China and in international relations. The allied invasion of north China in late summer 1900 was the first multinational intervention in the name of "civilization," with the issues and attendant problems that have become all too familiar in the early twenty-first century. Indeed, understanding the Boxer rising and the Boxer war remains a pressing contemporary issue. This volume will appeal to readers interested in modern Chinese, East Asian, and European history as well as the history of imperialism, colonialism, warfare, missionary work, and Christianity. Contributions by: C. A. Bayly, Lewis Bernstein, Robert Bickers, Paul A. Cohen, Henrietta Harrison, James L. Hevia, Ben Middleton, T. G. Otte, Roger R. Thompson, R. G. Tiedemann, and Anand A. Yang.

The Boxer Uprising by Victor Purcell

Title The Boxer Uprising
Author Victor Purcell
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2010-06-03
Category History
Total Pages 364
ISBN 052114812X
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Dr Prucell examines the origin and development of the Boxer Uprising of 1900.

Title The Fists of Righteous Harmony
Author Geoffrey Pen
Publisher Pen and Sword
Release Date 1991-03-19
Category History
Total Pages 300
ISBN 9780850524031
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book tells the story of the Boxer Rebellion in China in 1900. The Boxers were a fanatical secret organization who were incited by anti-foreign elements in the Chinese Government to commit wide-scale deportations against foreign missionaries and their Chinese converts. The Boxers had the tacit support of the Dowager Empress Tzu Hsi who maintained all the while that they were beyond her control. The Boxer Rebellion came to a head with the 55-day siege of the Peking Legations and ended in total humiliation for the Chinese.

The Siege At Peking by Peter Fleming

Title The Siege at Peking
Author Peter Fleming
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 1984
Category History
Total Pages 273
ISBN IND:30000020641712
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Tells of the 55-day siege of the foreign legation compound in Peking during the Boxer Rebellion

Heaven In Conflict by Anthony E. Clark

Title Heaven in Conflict
Author Anthony E. Clark
Publisher University of Washington Press
Release Date 2015-02-13
Category History
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9780295805405
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

One of the most violent episodes of China’s Boxer Uprising was the Taiyuan Massacre of 1900, in which rebels killed foreign missionaries and thousands of Chinese Christians. This first sustained scholarly account of the uprising to focus on Shanxi Province illuminates the religious and cultural beliefs on both sides of the conflict and shows how they came to clash. Although Franciscans were the first Catholics to settle in China, their stories have rarely been explored in accounts of Chinese Christianity. Anthony Clark remedies that exclusion and highlights the roles of Franciscan nuns and their counterparts among the Boxers—the Red Lantern girls—to argue that women’s involvement was integral on both sides of the conflict. Drawing on rich archival records and intertwining religious history with political, cultural, and environmental factors, Clark provides a fresh perspective on a pivotal encounter between China and the West.

The Boxer Rebellion by Lynn Bodin

Title The Boxer Rebellion
Author Lynn Bodin
Publisher Osprey Publishing
Release Date 1979-11-08
Category History
Total Pages 48
ISBN 0850453356
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In the year 1900, an unprecedented co-operation occurred between the eight major military powers of the world. For more than a year military and naval personnel from Austria-Hungary, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, Russia and the United States fought together against a common enemy. That enemy was a society whose goal was the extermination of all 'foreign devils' in China – the I Ho Ch'uan, or Righteous Harmonious Fists, better known to the West as the Boxers. This engaging account, packed with original photographs and full colour artwork, tells the story of this unique occurrence in military history.

Title Chinese Local Elites and Patterns of Dominance
Author Joseph W. Esherick
Publisher University of California Press
Release Date 2018-04-20
Category History
Total Pages 470
ISBN 9780520301054
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This important volume affords a panoramic view of local elites during the dramatic changes of late imperial and Republic China. Eleven specialists present fresh, detailed studies of subjects ranging from cultivated upper gentry to twentieth-century militarists, from wealthy urban merchants to village leaders. In the introduction and conclusion the editors reassess the pioneering gentry studies of the 1960s, draw comparisons to elites in Europe, and suggest new ways of looking at the top people in Chinese local social systems. Chinese Local Elites and Patterns of Dominance lays the foundation for future discussions of Chinese elites and provides a solid introduction for non-specialists. Essays are by Stephen C. Averill, Lenore Barkan, Lynda S. Bell, Timothy Brook, Prasenjit Duara, Edward A. McCord, William T. Rowe, Keith Schoppa, David Strand, Rubie S. Watson, and Madeleine Zelin. This title is part of UC Press's Voices Revived program, which commemorates University of California Press’s mission to seek out and cultivate the brightest minds and give them voice, reach, and impact. Drawing on a backlist dating to 1893, Voices Revived makes high-quality, peer-reviewed scholarship accessible once again using print-on-demand technology. This title was originally published in 1990.

The Boxer Rebellion by Charles River Editors

Title The Boxer Rebellion
Author Charles River Editors
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2019-07-16
Category
Total Pages 62
ISBN 1080938672
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

*Includes pictures *Includes a bibliography for further reading The 19th century saw the rise of one of the largest, most powerful empires of the modern era. The sun never set on the British Empire, whose holdings spanned the globe, in one form or another. Its naval supremacy linked the Commonwealth of Canada with the colonies in South Africa and India, and through them trade flowed east and west. An integral but underutilized part of this vast trade network included China, a reclusive Asian kingdom closed off from the Western world that desired none of its goods. Unfortunately for China, the British had the might of an empire and economic force, not to mention modern arms, on their side. Breaking into China's lucrative trade markets nearly destroyed the nation, severely discredited the Chinese dynasty, wreaked havoc on its people, and further propelled Britain's empire into a dominant economic and military position. The collision of these two empires took many years and caused much bloodshed. In fact, the troubles started well before the eventual hostilities, festering as frustration mounted until finally boiling over. Such was the state of relations between the British Empire and Qing Dynasty for the better part of the century, its footing upended from the very start of relations. On July 3, 1858, both parties signed the Treaty of Tianjin, the culmination of over half a century of Chinese-British diplomatic relations. For the first time, Great Britain, along with France, Russia, and the United States, could establish ambassadors in Peking. The treaty also opened 11 more ports to foreign trade, established the rights of foreign vessels to freely travel the Yangtze River and for foreigners to travel inland in China, and guaranteed religious freedom for Christians. The Second Opium War ended with the same lopsided diplomatic victory as the first. This time, however, the international scene painted a different picture, with very different consequences. While in the first war other foreign powers did not muscle their way into China until after the war, in the second foreign powers followed right after the British. Where once the British loomed over China unchallenged, now new powers made their presence felt, and they had no intention of leaving anytime soon. The French would broaden their empire in Asia along with the British, the consequences of which would involve both China and the United States over a century later. Russia would look eastward toward China and the Pacific, until its disastrous defeat in the Russo-Japanese War, and its relations with China would ebb and flow until the late 20th century. The United States, established in China, opened Japan to foreign trade the same year as the signing of the Treaty of Tianjin. In less than half a century, Japan would supplant China as the dominant power in the region. For these reasons, as well as others, the Opium Wars marked a dramatic shift in Asian history, and they understandably caused frustration among the Chinese, both at the foreigners and their own rulers. Eventually, the ire of the Chinese populace against the Westerners boiled over into open rebellion, not against the state, but against the foreigners themselves. With the tacit approval of the Chinese government, the Boxer Rebellion rattled the Western nations, but it would have unintended consequences at home as well. The Boxer Rebellion: The History and Legacy of the Anti-Imperialist Uprising in China at the End of the 19th Century examines the origins of the uprising, the results, and the aftermath. Along with pictures and a bibliography, you will learn about the Boxer Rebellion like never before.

Telling Chinese History by Frederic E. Wakeman

Title Telling Chinese History
Author Frederic E. Wakeman
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2009
Category History
Total Pages 453
ISBN 0520256069
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

"Frederic Wakeman's scholarship is impeccable and the breadth of learning in this book is astounding. I repeatedly found myself slowing down to savor the material. Many of the essays in this collection are no longer easily accessible, and placing them together in a single volume will be a great benefit to the next generation of students and scholars. "--Joseph W. Esherick, author of The Origins of the Boxer Uprising "This book brings together the best of Frederic Wakeman's articles, all of which are beautifully written and represent the remarkable breadth of Wakeman's research. The opportunity to read them together sheds new light on Chinese history and on the thought processes of one of the West's greatest historians."--Madeleine Zelin, Director of the East Asian National Resource Center at Columbia University

China Upside Down by Man-houng Lin

Title China Upside Down
Author Man-houng Lin
Publisher BRILL
Release Date 2020-03-23
Category History
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781684174386
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Many scholars have noted the role of China’s demand for silver in the emergence of the modern world. This book discusses the interaction of this demand and the early-nineteenth-century Latin American independence movements, changes in the world economy, the resulting disruptions in the Qing dynasty, and the transformation from the High Qing to modern China. Man-houng Lin shows how the disruption in the world’s silver supply caused by the turmoil in Latin America and subsequent changes in global markets led to the massive outflow of silver from China and the crisis of the Qing empire. During the first stage of this dynastic crisis, traditional ideas favoring plural centers of power became more popular than they ever had been. As the crisis developed, however, statist ideas came to the fore. Even though the Qing survived with the resumption of the influx of Latin American silver, its status relative to Japan in the East Asian order slipped. The statist inclination, although moderated to a degree in the modern period, is still ascendant in China today. These changes—Qing China’s near-collapse, the beginning of its eclipse by Japan in the East Asian order, and shifting notions of the proper relationship between state and market and between state and society—led to “China upside down.”

Title The Missionary s Curse and Other Tales from a Chinese Catholic Village
Author Henrietta Harrison
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2013-06-01
Category History
Total Pages 296
ISBN 9780520954724
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The Missionary’s Curse tells the story of a Chinese village that has been Catholic since the seventeenth century, drawing direct connections between its history, the globalizing church, and the nation. Harrison recounts the popular folk tales of merchants and peasants who once adopted Catholic rituals and teachings for their own purposes, only to find themselves in conflict with the orthodoxy of Franciscan missionaries arriving from Italy. The village’s long religious history, combined with the similarities between Chinese folk religion and Italian Catholicism, forces us to rethink the extreme violence committed in the area during the Boxer Uprising. The author also follows nineteenth century Chinese priests who campaigned against missionary control, up through the founding of the official church by the Communist Party in the 1950s. Harrison’s in-depth study provides a rare insight into villager experiences during the Socialist Education Movement and Cultural Revolution, as well as the growth of Christianity in China in recent years. She makes the compelling argument that Catholic practice in the village, rather than adopting Chinese forms in a gradual process of acculturation, has in fact become increasingly similar to those of Catholics in other parts of the world.

Title Taijiquan and The Search for The Little Old Chinese Man
Author A. Frank
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2006-11-13
Category Social Science
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780230601529
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book is an ethnographic study of the martial art of taijiquan (or 'tai chi') as it is practiced in China and the United States. Drawing on recent literature on ethnicity, critical race theory, the phenomenology of race, and globalization, the author discusses identity in terms of sensual experience and the transmission/receipt of knowledge.

Manchus And Han by Edward J. M. Rhoads

Title Manchus and Han
Author Edward J. M. Rhoads
Publisher University of Washington Press
Release Date 2017-05-01
Category History
Total Pages 404
ISBN 9780295997483
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

China�s 1911�12 Revolution, which overthrew a 2000-year succession of dynasties, is thought of primarily as a change in governmental style, from imperial to republican, traditional to modern. But given that the dynasty that was overthrown�the Qing�was that of a minority ethnic group that had ruled China�s Han majority for nearly three centuries, and that the revolutionaries were overwhelmingly Han, to what extent was the revolution not only anti-monarchical, but also anti-Manchu? Edward Rhoads explores this provocative and complicated question in Manchus and Han, analyzing the evolution of the Manchus from a hereditary military caste (the �banner people�) to a distinct ethnic group and then detailing the interplay and dialogue between the Manchu court and Han reformers that culminated in the dramatic changes of the early 20th century. Until now, many scholars have assumed that the Manchus had been assimilated into Han culture long before the 1911 Revolution and were no longer separate and distinguishable. But Rhoads demonstrates that in many ways Manchus remained an alien, privileged, and distinct group. Manchus and Han is a pathbreaking study that will forever change the way historians of China view the events leading to the fall of the Qing dynasty. Likewise, it will clarify for ethnologists the unique origin of the Manchus as an occupational caste and their shifting relationship with the Han, from border people to rulers to ruled. Winner of the Joseph Levenson Book Prize for Modern China, sponsored by The China and Inner Asia Council of the Association for Asian Studies

Autumn In The Heavenly Kingdom by Stephen R. Platt

Title Autumn in the Heavenly Kingdom
Author Stephen R. Platt
Publisher Alfred a Knopf Incorporated
Release Date 2012
Category History
Total Pages 470
ISBN 9780307271730
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Traces the revolution led by a failed civil servant, citing the roles played by the United States and Britain as well as the contributions of such figures as military strategist Zeng Guofan and Taiping leader Hong Rengan.

Title Uncle Sam s War of 1898 and the Origins of Globalization
Author Thomas D. Schoonover
Publisher University Press of Kentucky
Release Date 2013-03-25
Category History
Total Pages 200
ISBN 9780813143361
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The roots of American globalization can be found in the War of 1898. Then, as today, the United States actively engaged in globalizing its economic order, itspolitical institutions, and its values. Thomas Schoonover argues that this drive to expand political and cultural reach -- the quest for wealth, missionary fulfillment, security, power, and prestige -- was inherited by the United States from Europe, especially Spain and Great Britain. Uncle Sam's War of 1898 and the Origins of Globalization is a pathbreaking work of history that examines U.S. growth from its early nationhood to its first major military conflict on the world stage, also known as the Spanish-American War. As the new nation's military, industrial, and economic strength developed, the United States created policies designed to protect itself from challenges beyond its borders. According to Schoonover, a surge in U.S. activity in the Gulf-Caribbean and in Central America in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries was catalyzed by the same avarice and competitiveness that motivated the European adventurers to seek a route to Asia centuries earlier. Addressing the basic chronology and themes of the first century of the nation's expansion, Schoonover locates the origins of the U.S. goal of globalization. U.S. involvement in the War of 1898 reflects many of the fundamental patterns in our national history -- exploration and discovery, labor exploitation, violence, racism, class conflict, and concern for security -- that many believe shaped America's course in the twentieth and twenty-first century.