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The Fall Of The Faculty by Benjamin Ginsberg

Title The Fall of the Faculty
Author Benjamin Ginsberg
Publisher OUP USA
Release Date 2011-08-12
Category Education
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9780199782444
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, "deanlets"--administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience--are setting the educational agenda.The Fall of the Faculty examines the fallout of rampant administrative blight that now plagues the nation's universities. In the past decade, universities have added layers of administrators and staffers to their payrolls every year even while laying off full-time faculty in increasing numbers--ostensibly because of budget cuts. In a further irony, many of the newly minted--and non-academic--administrators are career managers who downplay the importance of teaching and research, as evidenced by their tireless advocacy for a banal "life skills" curriculum. Consequently, students are denied a more enriching educational experience--one defined by intellectual rigor. Ginsberg also reveals how the legitimate grievances of minority groups and liberal activists, which were traditionally championed by faculty members, have, in the hands of administrators, been reduced to chess pieces in a game of power politics. By embracing initiatives such as affirmative action, the administration gained favor with these groups and legitimized a thinly cloaked gambit to bolster their power over the faculty.As troubling as this trend has become, there are ways to reverse it. The Fall of the Faculty outlines how we can revamp the system so that real educators can regain their voice in curriculum policy.

The Fall Of The Faculty by Benjamin Ginsberg

Title The Fall of the Faculty
Author Benjamin Ginsberg
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2011-08-12
Category Education
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780199831470
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, "deanlets"--administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience--are setting the educational agenda. The Fall of the Faculty examines the fallout of rampant administrative blight that now plagues the nation's universities. In the past decade, universities have added layers of administrators and staffers to their payrolls every year even while laying off full-time faculty in increasing numbers--ostensibly because of budget cuts. In a further irony, many of the newly minted--and non-academic--administrators are career managers who downplay the importance of teaching and research, as evidenced by their tireless advocacy for a banal "life skills" curriculum. Consequently, students are denied a more enriching educational experience--one defined by intellectual rigor. Ginsberg also reveals how the legitimate grievances of minority groups and liberal activists, which were traditionally championed by faculty members, have, in the hands of administrators, been reduced to chess pieces in a game of power politics. By embracing initiatives such as affirmative action, the administration gained favor with these groups and legitimized a thinly cloaked gambit to bolster their power over the faculty. As troubling as this trend has become, there are ways to reverse it. The Fall of the Faculty outlines how we can revamp the system so that real educators can regain their voice in curriculum policy.

The Fall Of The Faculty by Benjamin Ginsberg

Title The Fall of the Faculty
Author Benjamin Ginsberg
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2011-05-01
Category Education
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780199782680
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Until very recently, American universities were led mainly by their faculties, which viewed intellectual production and pedagogy as the core missions of higher education. Today, as Benjamin Ginsberg warns in this eye-opening, controversial book, "deanlets"--administrators and staffers often without serious academic backgrounds or experience--are setting the educational agenda. The Fall of the Faculty examines the fallout of rampant administrative blight that now plagues the nation's universities. In the past decade, universities have added layers of administrators and staffers to their payrolls every year even while laying off full-time faculty in increasing numbers--ostensibly because of budget cuts. In a further irony, many of the newly minted--and non-academic--administrators are career managers who downplay the importance of teaching and research, as evidenced by their tireless advocacy for a banal "life skills" curriculum. Consequently, students are denied a more enriching educational experience--one defined by intellectual rigor. Ginsberg also reveals how the legitimate grievances of minority groups and liberal activists, which were traditionally championed by faculty members, have, in the hands of administrators, been reduced to chess pieces in a game of power politics. By embracing initiatives such as affirmative action, the administration gained favor with these groups and legitimized a thinly cloaked gambit to bolster their power over the faculty. As troubling as this trend has become, there are ways to reverse it. The Fall of the Faculty outlines how we can revamp the system so that real educators can regain their voice in curriculum policy.

Title The Rise and Decline of Faculty Governance
Author Larry G. Gerber
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2014-09-15
Category Education
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9781421414645
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Gerber reflects on whether American colleges and universities will be able to retain their position of global preeminence in an increasingly market-driven environment, given that the system of governance that helped make their success possible has been fundamentally altered.

Cracks In The Ivory Tower by Jason Brennan

Title Cracks in the Ivory Tower
Author Jason Brennan
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2019-04-01
Category Education
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780190846299
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Academics extol high-minded ideals, such as serving the common good and promoting social justice. Universities aim to be centers of learning that find the best and brightest students, treat them fairly, and equip them with the knowledge they need to lead better lives. But as Jason Brennan and Phillip Magness show in Cracks in the Ivory Tower, American universities fall far short of this ideal. At almost every level, they find that students, professors, and administrators are guided by self-interest rather than ethical concerns. College bureaucratic structures also often incentivize and reward bad behavior, while disincentivizing and even punishing good behavior. Most students, faculty, and administrators are out to serve themselves and pass their costs onto others. The problems are deep and pervasive: most academic marketing and advertising is semi-fraudulent. To justify their own pay raises and higher budgets, administrators hire expensive and unnecessary staff. Faculty exploit students for tuition dollars through gen-ed requirements. Students hardly learn anything and cheating is pervasive. At every level, academics disguise their pursuit of self-interest with high-faluting moral language. Marshaling an array of data, Brennan and Magness expose many of the ethical failings of academia and in turn reshape our understanding of how such high power institutions run their business. Everyone knows academia is dysfunctional. Brennan and Magness show the problems are worse than anyone realized. Academics have only themselves to blame.

Title The Rise and Fall of Mass Marketing RLE Marketing
Author Richard S. Tedlow
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2014-09-15
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 252
ISBN 9781317663010
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book provides new insights into the changes in interpretation of marketing and the evolution of marketing strategies during the twentieth century. The focus is on the development of mass marketing in the United States and the way in which more flexible and adaptable forms of marketing have increasingly been taking over. This highly international volume draws contributors from the USA, Europe and Japan, and from a variety of academic disciplines, including marketing, economics and business history. Chapters provide detailed analysis of the marketing of a range of products including cars, washing machines, food retailing, Scotch whisky, computers, financial services and wheat.

Slow Professor by Maggie Berg

Title Slow Professor
Author Maggie Berg
Publisher University of Toronto Press
Release Date 2016-01-01
Category College teachers
Total Pages 115
ISBN 9781442645561
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In The Slow Professor, Maggie Berg and Barbara K. Seeber discuss how adopting the principles of the Slow movement in academic life can counter the erosion of humanistic education.

The Faculty Lounges by Naomi Schaefer Riley

Title The Faculty Lounges
Author Naomi Schaefer Riley
Publisher Ivan R. Dee
Release Date 2011-06-16
Category Family & Relationships
Total Pages 216
ISBN 9781566638883
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

College tuition has risen four times faster than the rate of inflation in the past two decades. While faculties like to blame the rising costs on fancy athletic buildings and bloated administrations, professors are hardly getting the short end of the stick. Spending on instruction has increased twenty-two percent over the past decade at private research universities. Parents and taxpayers shouldn't get overheated about faculty salaries: tenure is where they should concentrate their anger. The jobs-for-life entitlement that comes with an ivory tower position is at the heart of so many problems with higher education today. Veteran journalist Naomi Schaefer Riley, an alumna of one of the country's most expensive and best-endowed schools, explores how tenure has promoted a class system in higher education, leaving contingent faculty who are barely making minimum wage and have no time for students to teach large swaths of the undergraduate population. She shows how the institution of tenure forces junior professors to keep their mouths shut for a decade or more if they disagree with senior faculty about anything from politics to research methods. Lastly, she examines how the institution of tenure—with the job security, mediocre salaries, and low levels of accountability it entails—may be attracting the least innovative and interesting members of our society into teaching.

The Great Mistake by Christopher Newfield

Title The Great Mistake
Author Christopher Newfield
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press
Release Date 2018-10-01
Category Education
Total Pages 448
ISBN 9781421427034
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A powerful, hopeful critique of the unnecessary death spiral of higher education, The Great Mistake is essential reading for those who wonder why students have been paying more to get less and for everyone who cares about the role the higher education system plays in improving the lives of average Americans.

Title The Lost Soul of Higher Education
Author Ellen Schrecker
Publisher The New Press
Release Date 2010-08-24
Category Education
Total Pages 306
ISBN 9781595586032
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The professor and historian delivers a major critique of how political and financial attacks on the academy are undermining our system of higher education. Making a provocative foray into the public debates over higher education, acclaimed historian Ellen Schrecker argues that the American university is under attack from two fronts. On the one hand, outside pressure groups have staged massive challenges to academic freedom, beginning in the 1960s with attacks on faculty who opposed the Vietnam War, and resurfacing more recently with well-funded campaigns against Middle Eastern Studies scholars. Connecting these dots, Schrecker reveals a distinct pattern of efforts to undermine the legitimacy of any scholarly study that threatens the status quo. At the same time, Schrecker deftly chronicles the erosion of university budgets and the encroachment of private-sector influence into academic life. From the dwindling numbers of full-time faculty to the collapse of library budgets, The Lost Soul of Higher Education depicts a system increasingly beholden to corporate America and starved of the resources it needs to educate the new generation of citizens. A sharp riposte to the conservative critics of the academy by the leading historian of the McCarthy-era witch hunts, The Lost Soul of Higher Education, reveals a system in peril—and defends the vital role of higher education in our democracy.

Inside Graduate Admissions by Julie R. Posselt

Title Inside Graduate Admissions
Author Julie R. Posselt
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2016-01-11
Category Education
Total Pages 262
ISBN 9780674915664
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Advanced degrees are necessary for careers that once required only a college education. Yet little has been written about who gets into grad school and why. Julie Posselt pulls back the curtain on this secret process, revealing how faculty evaluate applicants in top-ranked doctoral programs in the humanities, social sciences, and natural sciences.

Downsizing Democracy by Matthew A. Crenson

Title Downsizing Democracy
Author Matthew A. Crenson
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2004
Category Political Science
Total Pages 294
ISBN 0801878861
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In Downsizing Democracy, Matthew A. Crenson and Benjamin Ginsberg describe how the once powerful idea of a collective citizenry has given way to a concept of personal, autonomous democracy. Today, political change is effected through litigation, lobbying, and term limits, rather than active participation in the political process, resulting in narrow special interest groups dominating state and federal decision-making. At a time when an American's investment in the democratic process has largely been reduced to an annual contribution to a political party or organization, Downsizing Democracy offers a critical reassessment of American democracy.

Title The Assault on American Excellence
Author Anthony T. Kronman
Publisher Free Press
Release Date 2020-08-11
Category Education
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781501199493
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

“I want to call it a cry of the heart, but it’s more like a cry of the brain, a calm and erudite one.” —Peggy Noonan, The Wall Street Journal The former dean of Yale Law School argues that the feverish egalitarianism gripping college campuses today is a threat to our democracy. College education is under attack from all sides these days. Most of the handwringing—over free speech, safe zones, trigger warnings, and the babying of students—has focused on the excesses of political correctness. That may be true, but as Anthony Kronman shows, it’s not the real problem. “Necessary, humane, and brave” (Bret Stephens, The New York Times), The Assault on American Excellence makes the case that the boundless impulse for democratic equality gripping college campuses today is a threat to institutions whose job is to prepare citizens to live in a vibrant democracy. Three centuries ago, the founders of our nation saw that for this country to have a robust government, it must have citizens trained to have tough skins, to make up their own minds, and to win arguments not on the basis of emotion but because their side is closer to the truth. Without that, Americans would risk electing demagogues. Kronman is the first to tie today’s campus clashes to the history of American values, drawing on luminaries like Alexis de Tocqueville and John Adams to argue that our modern controversies threaten the best of our intellectual traditions. His tone is warm and wise, that of an educator who has devoted his life to helping students be capable of living up to the demands of a free society—and to do so, they must first be tested in a system that isn’t focused on sympathy at the expense of rigor and that values excellence above all.

The Fall Of A Sparrow by Robert Hellenga

Title The Fall of a Sparrow
Author Robert Hellenga
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 1999-07-06
Category Fiction
Total Pages 464
ISBN 9780684850276
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Tells the story of a midwestern professor who, his career ruined by an affair with a student, travels to Bologna to attend a trial of terrorists who had killed his eldest daughter

Title Equality for Contingent Faculty
Author Keith Hoeller
Publisher Vanderbilt University Press
Release Date 2021-04-30
Category Education
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9780826503473
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Vice President Joseph Biden has blamed tuition increases on the high salaries of college professors, seemingly unaware of the fact that there are now over one million faculty who earn poverty-level wages teaching off the tenure track. The Chronicle of Higher Education ran a story entitled "From Graduate School to Welfare: The PhD Now Comes with Food Stamps." Today three-fourths of all faculty are characterized as "contingent instructional staff," a nearly tenfold increase from 1975. Equality for Contingent Faculty brings together eleven activists from the United States and Canada to describe the problem, share case histories, and offer concrete solutions. The book begins with three accounts of successful organizing efforts within the two-track system. The second part describes how the two-track system divides the faculty into haves and have-nots and leaves the majority without the benefit of academic freedom or the support of their institutions. The third part offers roadmaps for overcoming the deficiencies of the two-track system and providing equality for all professors, regardless of status or rank.

Title Challengers Competition and Reelection
Author Jonathan S. Krasno
Publisher Yale University Press
Release Date 1997-02-01
Category Political Science
Total Pages 199
ISBN 0300068743
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Why do US Senators have a harder time winning re-election than members of the House of Representatives? This text argues that Senate challengers are more likely to be experienced politicians who wage intense, costly media campaigns than are those who take on House incumbents.

The End Of College by Kevin Carey

Title The End of College
Author Kevin Carey
Publisher Riverhead Books
Release Date 2016
Category Education
Total Pages 277
ISBN 9781594634048
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the New York Times-bestselling The End of College, education expert Kevin Carey draws on new research to paint a portrait of the future of education. He explains how the college and university experiences are being radically altered and how this fact will emancipate millions of students. Insightful and readable, The End of College is an innovative roadmap to understanding tomorrow's higher education for teachers, parents and students.

The Faculty Club by Danny Tobey

Title The Faculty Club
Author Danny Tobey
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2010-06-01
Category Fiction
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781439163108
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

At the world’s most exclusive law school, there’s a secret society rumored to catapult its members to fame and fortune. Everyone is dying to get in . . . Jeremy Davis is the rising star of his first-year class. He’s got a plum job with the best professor on campus. He’s caught the eye of a dazzling Rhodes scholar named Daphne. But something dark is stirring behind the ivy. When a mysterious club promises success beyond his wildest dreams, Jeremy uncovers a macabre secret older than the university itself. In a race against time, Jeremy must stop an ancient ritual that will sacrifice the lives of those he loves most and blur the lines between good and evil. In this extraordinary debut thriller, Danny Tobey offers a fascinating glimpse into the rarefied world of an elite New England school and the unthinkable dangers that lie within its gates. He deftly weaves a tale of primeval secrets and betrayal into an ingenious brain teaser that will keep readers up late into the night. Packed with enigmatic professors, secret codes, hidden tunnels, and sinister villains, The Faculty Club establishes Danny Tobey as this season’s most thrilling new author.

Faculty Towers by Elaine Showalter

Title Faculty Towers
Author Elaine Showalter
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2005
Category American fiction
Total Pages 166
ISBN 019928332X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the days before there were handbooks, self-help guides, or advice columns for graduate students and junior faculty, there were academic novels teaching us how a proper professor should speak, behave, dress, think, write, love, and (more than occasionally) solve murders. If many of thesebooks are wildly funny, others paint pictures of failure and pain, of lives wasted or destroyed. Like the suburbs, Elaine Showalter notes, the campus can be the site of pastoral and refuge. But even ivory towers can be structurally unsound, or at least built with glass ceilings. Though we love toread about them, all is not well in the faculty towers, and the situation has been worsening.In Faculty Towers, Showalter takes a personal look at the ways novels about the academy have charted changes in the university and society since 1950. With her readings of C. P. Snow's idealized world of Cambridge dons or of the globe-trotting antics of David Lodge's Morris Zapp, of the sleuthingKate Fansler in Amanda Cross's best-selling mystery series or of the recent spate of bitter novels in which narratives of sexual harassment seem to serve as fables of power, anger, and desire, Showalter holds a mirror up to the world she has inhabited over the course of a distinguished and oftencontroversial career.