Download The Death Of Aztec Tenochtitlan The Life Of Mexico City Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online The Death Of Aztec Tenochtitlan The Life Of Mexico City full books anytime and anywhere. Click download or read online button and get unlimited access by create free account.

Title The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan the Life of Mexico City
Author Barbara E. Mundy
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2018-03-22
Category Art
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1477317139
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Winner, Book Prize in Latin American Studies, Colonial Section of Latin American Studies Association (LASA), 2016 ALAA Book Award, Association for Latin American Art/Arvey Foundation, 2016 The capital of the Aztec empire, Tenochtitlan, was, in its era, one of the largest cities in the world. Built on an island in the middle of a shallow lake, its population numbered perhaps 150,000, with another 350,000 people in the urban network clustered around the lake shores. In 1521, at the height of Tenochtitlan's power, which extended over much of Central Mexico, Hernando Cortés and his followers conquered the city. Cortés boasted to King Charles V of Spain that Tenochtitlan was "destroyed and razed to the ground." But was it? Drawing on period representations of the city in sculptures, texts, and maps, The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the Life of Mexico City builds a convincing case that this global capital remained, through the sixteenth century, very much an Amerindian city. Barbara E. Mundy foregrounds the role the city's indigenous peoples, the Nahua, played in shaping Mexico City through the construction of permanent architecture and engagement in ceremonial actions. She demonstrates that the Aztec ruling elites, who retained power even after the conquest, were instrumental in building and then rebuilding the city. Mundy shows how the Nahua entered into mutually advantageous alliances with the Franciscans to maintain the city's sacred nodes. She also focuses on the practical and symbolic role of the city's extraordinary waterworks—the product of a massive ecological manipulation begun in the fifteenth century—to reveal how the Nahua struggled to maintain control of water resources in early Mexico City.

Title The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan the Life of Mexico City
Author Barbara E. Mundy
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2015-07-15
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780292766563
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

"In 1325, the Aztecs founded their capital city Tenochtitlan, which grew to be one of the world's largest cities before it was violently destroyed in 1521 by conquistadors from Spain and their indigenous allies. Re-christened and reoccupied by the Spanish conquerors as Mexico City, it became the pivot of global trade linking Europe and Asia in the 17th century, and one of the modern world's most populous metropolitan areas. However, the Aztec city of Tenochtitlan and its people did not entirely disappear when the Spanish conquistadors destroyed it. By reorienting Mexico City-Tenochtitlan as a colonial capital and indigenous city, Mundy demonstrates its continuity across time. Using maps, manuscripts, and artworks, she draws out two themes: the struggle for power by indigenous city rulers and the management and manipulation of local ecology, especially water, that was necessary to maintain the city's sacred character. What emerges is the story of a city-within-a city that continues to this day"--

Title The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan the Life of Mexico City
Author Barbara E. Mundy
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2015-07-15
Category Art
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780292766587
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The capital of the Aztec empire, Tenochtitlan, was, in its era, one of the largest cities in the world. Built on an island in the middle of a shallow lake, its population numbered perhaps 150,000, with another 350,000 people in the urban network clustered around the lake shores. In 1521, at the height of Tenochtitlan's power, which extended over much of Central Mexico, Hernando Cortés and his followers conquered the city. Cortés boasted to King Charles V of Spain that Tenochtitlan was "destroyed and razed to the ground." But was it? Drawing on period representations of the city in sculptures, texts, and maps, The Death of Aztec Tenochtitlan, the Life of Mexico City builds a convincing case that this global capital remained, through the sixteenth century, very much an Amerindian city. Barbara E. Mundy foregrounds the role the city's indigenous peoples, the Nahua, played in shaping Mexico City through the construction of permanent architecture and engagement in ceremonial actions. She demonstrates that the Aztec ruling elites, who retained power even after the conquest, were instrumental in building and then rebuilding the city. Mundy shows how the Nahua entered into mutually advantageous alliances with the Franciscans to maintain the city's sacred nodes. She also focuses on the practical and symbolic role of the city's extraordinary waterworks—the product of a massive ecological manipulation begun in the fifteenth century—to reveal how the Nahua struggled to maintain control of water resources in early Mexico City.

Title Painting a Map of Sixteenth century Mexico City
Author Mary Ellen Miller
Publisher Beinecke Rare Book &
Release Date 2012
Category Art
Total Pages 216
ISBN 0300180713
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

"In 1975 the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library of Yale University acquired an exceptional mid-sixteenth-century map of Mexico City, which, until 1521, had been the capital of the Aztecs, the Nahua-speaking peoples who dominated the Valley of Mexico. This extraordinary six-by-three-foot document, showing landholdings and indigenous rulers, has yielded a wealth of information about the artistic, linguistic, and material culture of the Nahua after the Spanish invasion. Painting a Map of Sixteenth-Century Mexico City, edited and with contributions by Mary E. Miller and Barbara E. Mundy, is the first publication of both the complete map and the multidisciplinary research that it spurred. A distinguished team of specialists in history, art history, linguistics, and conservation science has worked together for nearly a decade. The result of all their work, this book focuses not only on the map, but also explores the situation of the indigenous people of Mexico City and their interactions with Europeans at the time the map was made. The scientific analysis of the map's pigments and paper carried out by Diana Magaloni Kerpel, Richard Newman, and Michele Derrick in 2007 marks the most thorough examination of a pictorial document from early colonial Mexico to date."--Jacket.

Fifth Sun by Camilla Townsend

Title Fifth Sun
Author Camilla Townsend
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 2019
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780190673062
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Fifth Sun offers a comprehensive history of the Aztecs, spanning the period before conquest to a century after the conquest, based on rarely-used Nahuatl-language sources written by the indigenous people.

The Mapping Of New Spain by Barbara E. Mundy

Title The Mapping of New Spain
Author Barbara E. Mundy
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 1996
Category History
Total Pages 281
ISBN 0226550974
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

To learn about its territories in the New World, Spain commissioned a survey of Spanish officials in Mexico between 1578 and 1584, asking for local maps as well as descriptions of local resources, history, and geography. In The Mapping of New Spain, Barbara Mundy illuminates both the Amerindian (Aztec, Mixtec, and Zapotec) and the Spanish traditions represented in these maps and traces the reshaping of indigene world views in the wake of colonization. "Its contribution to its specific field is both significant and original. . . . It is a pure pleasure to read." —Sabine MacCormack, Isis "Mundy has done a fine job of balancing the artistic interpretation of the maps with the larger historical context within which they were drawn. . . . This is an important work." —John F. Schwaller, Sixteenth Century Journal "This beautiful book opens a Pandora's box in the most positive sense, for it provokes the reconsideration of several long-held opinions about Spanish colonialism and its effects on Native American culture." —Susan Schroeder, American Historical Review

Portraying The Aztec Past by Angela Herren Rajagopalan

Title Portraying the Aztec Past
Author Angela Herren Rajagopalan
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2018-12-12
Category Art
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781477316092
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

During the period of Aztec expansion and empire (ca. 1325–1525), scribes of high social standing used a pictographic writing system to paint hundreds of manuscripts detailing myriad aspects of life, including historical, calendric, and religious information. Following the Spanish conquest, native and mestizo tlacuiloque (artist-scribes) of the sixteenth century continued to use pre-Hispanic pictorial writing systems to record information about native culture. Three of these manuscripts—Codex Boturini, Codex Azcatitlan, and Codex Aubin—document the origin and migration of the Mexica people, one of several indigenous groups often collectively referred to as “Aztec.” In Portraying the Aztec Past, Angela Herren Rajagopalan offers a thorough study of these closely linked manuscripts, articulating their narrative and formal connections and examining differences in format, style, and communicative strategies. Through analyses that focus on the materials, stylistic traits, facture, and narrative qualities of the codices, she places these annals in their historical and social contexts. Her work adds to our understanding of the production and function of these manuscripts and explores how Mexica identity is presented and framed after the conquest.

Title Several Ways to Die in Mexico City
Author Kurt Hollander
Publisher Feral House
Release Date 2012-10-09
Category Social Science
Total Pages 300
ISBN 9781936239498
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In the '80s, when author/photographer Kurt Hollander lived in New York and published The Portable Lower East, life there was particularly rough, and cops often drove yellow cabs as a method to surprise and roust its residents. Before the decade ended, Hollander moved to the equally rough climes of Mexico City, making his living writing and photographing for The Guardian, The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and many other publications. Hollander's visual and textual extravaganza, Several Ways to Die in Mexico City, provides a perspective of this extraordinary city that could only have been caught by an observant outsider who lived in all its nooks and crannies for over two decades. Crammed with caustic but fair observations of the city's history, food, cults, drugs, and buildings, Hollander proves that he can love a city and culture that also kills its inhabitants softly. While living high in Mexico City, Kurt Hollander edited poliester, the renowned bilingual art magazine about the Americas. He also directed the feature film Carambola, and wrote a successful series of children's books. Grove Press published the Portable Lower East Side anthology in 1994.

Transcending Conquest by Stephanie Wood

Title Transcending Conquest
Author Stephanie Wood
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2012-08-31
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780806180748
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Columbus arrived on North American shores in 1492, and Cortés had replaced Moctezuma, the Aztec Nahua emperor, as the major figurehead in central Mexico by 1521. Five centuries later, the convergence of “old” and “new” worlds and the consequences of colonization continue to fascinate and horrify us. In Transcending Conquest, Stephanie Wood uses Nahuatl writings and illustrations to reveal Nahua perspectives on Spanish colonial occupation of the Western Hemisphere. Mesoamerican peoples have a strong tradition of pictorial record keeping, and out of respect for this tradition, Wood examines multiple examples of pictorial imagery to explore how Native manuscripts have depicted the European invader and colonizer. She has combed national and provincial archives in Mexico and visited some of the Nahua communities of central Mexico to collect and translate Native texts. Analyzing and interpreting changes in indigenous views and attitudes throughout three hundred years of foreign rule, Wood considers variations in perspectives--between the indigenous elite and the laboring classes, and between those who resisted and those who allied themselves with the European intruders. Transcending Conquest goes beyond the familiar voices recorded by scribes in central colonial Mexico and the Spanish conquerors to include indigenous views from the outlying Mesoamerican provinces and to explore Native historical narratives from the sixteenth through the eighteenth century. Wood explores how evolving sentiments in indigenous communities about increasing competition for resources ultimately resulted in an anti-Spanish discourse, a trend largely overlooked by scholars--until now. Transcending Conquest takes us beyond the romantic focus on the deeds of the Spanish conqueror to show how the so-called “conquest” was limited by the ways that Native peoples and their descendants reshaped the historical narrative to better suit their memories, identities, and visions of the future.

Tenochtitlan by José Luis de Rojas

Title Tenochtitlan
Author José Luis de Rojas
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2012
Category History
Total Pages 225
ISBN 0813042208
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

An accessible overview of archaeological knowledge of the seat of the Aztec empire, Tenochtitlan.

The Florentine Codex by Jeanette Favrot Peterson

Title The Florentine Codex
Author Jeanette Favrot Peterson
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2019-09-10
Category Art
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781477318409
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In the sixteenth century, the Franciscan friar Bernardino de Sahagún and a team of indigenous grammarians, scribes, and painters completed decades of work on an extraordinary encyclopedic project titled General History of the Things of New Spain, known as the Florentine Codex (1575–1577). Now housed in the Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence and bound in three lavishly illustrated volumes, the codex is a remarkable product of cultural exchange in the early Americas. In this edited volume, experts from multiple disciplines analyze the manuscript’s bilingual texts and more than 2,000 painted images and offer fascinating, new insights on its twelve books. The contributors examine the “three texts” of the codex—the original Nahuatl, its translation into Spanish, and its painted images. Together, these constitute complementary, as well as conflicting, voices of an extended dialogue that occurred in and around Mexico City. The volume chapters address a range of subjects, from Nahua sacred beliefs, moral discourse, and natural history to the Florentine artists’ models and the manuscript’s reception in Europe. The Florentine Codex ultimately yields new perspectives on the Nahua world several decades after the fall of the Aztec empire.

Tenochtitlan 1519 21 by Si Sheppard

Title Tenochtitlan 1519 21
Author Si Sheppard
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date 2018-05-31
Category History
Total Pages 96
ISBN 9781472820198
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In 1519, the Conquistador Hernán Cortés landed on the mainland of the Americas. His quest to serve God, win gold, and achieve glory drove him into the heartland of what is now Mexico, where no European had ever set foot before. He marched towards to the majestic city of Tenochtitlan, floating like a jewel in the midst of Lake Texcoco. This encounter brought together cultures that had hitherto evolved in complete isolation from each other – Catholic Spain and the Aztec Empire. What ensued was the swift escalation from a clash of civilizations to a war of the worlds. At the conclusion of the Conquistador campaign of 1519–21, Tenochtitlan lay in ruins, the last Aztec Emperor was in chains, and Spanish authority over the native peoples had been definitively asserted. With the colourful personalities – Cortés, Malinche, Pedro Alvarez, Cuitláhuac, Cuauhtémoc – driving the narrative, and the vivid differences in uniforms, weapons, and fighting styles between the rival armies (displayed using stunning specially commissioned artwork), this is the fascinating story of the collapse of the Aztec Empire.

Daily Life Of The Aztecs by Frances Berdan

Title Daily Life of the Aztecs
Author Frances Berdan
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2020-10-31
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780521516365
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book offers views of Aztec lives and their interactions in rituals, markets, courts, and on the battlefield.

Trail Of Footprints by Alex Hidalgo

Title Trail of Footprints
Author Alex Hidalgo
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2019-07-12
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9781477317549
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Trail of Footprints offers an intimate glimpse into the commission, circulation, and use of indigenous maps from colonial Mexico. A collection of one hundred, largely unpublished, maps from the late sixteenth to the eighteenth centuries made in the southern region of Oaxaca, anchors an analysis of the way ethnically diverse societies produced knowledge in colonial settings. Mapmaking, proposes Hidalgo, formed part of an epistemological shift tied to the negotiation of land and natural resources between the region’s Spanish, Indian, and mixed-race communities. The craft of making maps drew from social memory, indigenous and European conceptions of space and ritual, and Spanish legal practices designed to adjust spatial boundaries in the New World. Indigenous mapmaking brought together a distinct coalition of social actors—Indian leaders, native towns, notaries, surveyors, judges, artisans, merchants, muleteers, collectors, and painters—who participated in the critical observation of the region’s geographic features. Demand for maps reconfigured technologies associated with the making of colorants, adhesives, and paper that drew from Indian botany and experimentation, trans-Atlantic commerce, and Iberian notarial culture. The maps in this study reflect a regional perspective associated with Oaxaca’s decentralized organization, its strategic position amidst a network of important trade routes that linked central Mexico to Central America, and the ruggedness and diversity of its physical landscape.

Dreaming Of Dry Land by Vera S. Candiani

Title Dreaming of Dry Land
Author Vera S. Candiani
Publisher Stanford University Press
Release Date 2014-06-04
Category History
Total Pages 408
ISBN 9780804791076
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Not long after the conquest, the City of Mexico's rise to become the crown jewel in the Spanish empire was compromised by the lakes that surrounded it. Their increasing propensity to overflow destroyed wealth and alarmed urban elites, who responded with what would become the most transformative and protracted drainage project in the early modern America—the Desagüe de Huehuetoca. Hundreds of technicians, thousands of indigenous workers, and millions of pesos were marshaled to realize a complex system of canals, tunnels, dams, floodgates, and reservoirs. Vera S. Candiani's Dreaming of Dry Land weaves a narrative that describes what colonization was and looked like on the ground, and how it affected land, water, biota, humans, and the relationship among them, to explain the origins of our built and unbuilt landscapes. Connecting multiple historiographical traditions—history of science and technology, environmental history, social history, and Atlantic history—Candiani proposes that colonization was a class, not an ethnic or nation-based phenomenon, occurring simultaneously on both sides of an Atlantic, where state-building and empire-building were intertwined.

Title Hidden World of the Aztec
Author Peter Lourie
Publisher Snake Mountain Press
Release Date 2016-10-31
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN 0984863761
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In 1521 the world of the Aztecs came to a sudden end when Hernan Cortes, the Spanish conquistador, destroyed their capital. The ruins of that city lie beneath the streets of modern-day Mexico City. Peter Lourie traveled to Mexico City to meet the renowned archaeologist Leonardo Lopez Lujan. With Dr. Lujan as his guide, the author viewed the diggings at the Aztec Great Temple, and even met the God of Death in the basement of the temple's museum."

When Montezuma Met Cortes by Matthew Restall

Title When Montezuma Met Cortes
Author Matthew Restall
Publisher HarperCollins
Release Date 2018-02-06
Category History
Total Pages 560
ISBN 9780062427281
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

A dramatic rethinking of the encounter between Montezuma and Hernando Cortés that completely overturns what we know about the Spanish conquest of the Americas On November 8, 1519, the Spanish conquistador Hernando Cortés first met Montezuma, the Aztec emperor, at the entrance to the capital city of Tenochtitlan. This introduction—the prelude to the Spanish seizure of Mexico City and to European colonization of the mainland of the Americas—has long been the symbol of Cortés’s bold and brilliant military genius. Montezuma, on the other hand, is remembered as a coward who gave away a vast empire and touched off a wave of colonial invasions across the hemisphere. But is this really what happened? In a departure from traditional tellings, When Montezuma Met Cortés uses “the Meeting”—as Restall dubs their first encounter—as the entry point into a comprehensive reevaluation of both Cortés and Montezuma. Drawing on rare primary sources and overlooked accounts by conquistadors and Aztecs alike, Restall explores Cortés’s and Montezuma’s posthumous reputations, their achievements and failures, and the worlds in which they lived—leading, step by step, to a dramatic inversion of the old story. As Restall takes us through this sweeping, revisionist account of a pivotal moment in modern civilization, he calls into question our view of the history of the Americas, and, indeed, of history itself.

The Mexico City Reader by Ruben Gallo

Title The Mexico City Reader
Author Ruben Gallo
Publisher Univ of Wisconsin Press
Release Date 2009-09-29
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 366
ISBN 0299197131
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Mexico City is one of Latin America’s cultural capitals, and one of the most vibrant urban spaces in the world. The Mexico City Reader is an anthology of "Cronicas"—short, hybrid texts that are part literary essay, part urban reportage—about life in the capital. This is not the "City of Palaces" of yesteryear, but the vibrant, chaotic, anarchic urban space of the1980s and 1990s—the city of garbage mafias, necrophiliac artists, and kitschy millionaires. Like the visitor wandering through the city streets, the reader will be constantly surprised by the visions encountered in this mosaic of writings—a textual space brimming with life and crowded with flâneurs, flirtatious students, Indian dancers, food vendors, fortune tellers, political activists, and peasant protesters. The essays included in this anthology were written by a panoply of writers, from well-known authors like Carlos Monsiváis and Jorge Ibagüengoitia to younger figures like Fabrizio Mejía Madrid and Juieta García González, all of whom are experienced practitioners of the city. The texts collected in this anthology are among the most striking examples of this concomitant "theory and practice" of Mexico City, that most delirious of megalopolises. “[An] exciting literary journey . . .”—Carolyn Malloy, Multicultural Review

Aztec by Gary Jennings

Title Aztec
Author Gary Jennings
Publisher Forge Books
Release Date 2016-04-12
Category Fiction
Total Pages 768
ISBN 9780765392176
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Gary Jennings's Aztec is the extraordinary story of the last and greatest native civilization of North America. Told in the words of one of the most robust and memorable characters in modern fiction, Mixtli-Dark Cloud, Aztec reveals the very depths of Aztec civilization from the peak and feather-banner splendor of the Aztec Capital of Tenochtitlan to the arrival of Hernán Cortás and his conquistadores, and their destruction of the Aztec empire. The story of Mixtli is the story of the Aztecs themselves---a compelling, epic tale of heroic dignity and a colossal civilization's rise and fall. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Holy Rover by Lori Erickson

Title Holy Rover
Author Lori Erickson
Publisher Fortress Press
Release Date 2017-09-01
Category Travel
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781506420721
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

"Whether describing mystical visions or the rhythms of everyday life, Erickson turns the spiritual journey into a series of exciting transformations." —Publishers Weekly (starred review) From her childhood on an Iowa farm, Lori Erickson grew up to travel the world as a writer specializing in holy sitesjourneys that led her on an ever-deepening spiritual quest. In Holy Rover, she weaves her personal narrative with descriptions of a dozen pilgrimages. Along the way, Erickson encounters spiritual leaders who include the chief priest of the Icelandic pagan religion of Asatru, a Trappist monk at Thomas Merton's Gethsemani Abbey, and a Lakota retreat director at South Dakota's Bear Butte. Both irreverent and devout, Holy Rover includes images of holy sites around the world taken by several of the nation's leading travel photographers. Travel writer, Episcopal deacon, and author of the Holy Rover blog at Patheos, Erickson is an engaging guide for pilgrims eager to take a spiritual journey. Her book describes travels that changed her life and can change yours, too.