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Title The Dancing Lares and the Serpent in the Garden
Author Harriet I. Flower
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2017-09-26
Category History
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9781400888016
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The most pervasive gods in ancient Rome had no traditional mythology attached to them, nor was their worship organized by elites. Throughout the Roman world, neighborhood street corners, farm boundaries, and household hearths featured small shrines to the beloved lares, a pair of cheerful little dancing gods. These shrines were maintained primarily by ordinary Romans, and often by slaves and freedmen, for whom the lares cult provided a unique public leadership role. In this comprehensive and richly illustrated book, the first to focus on the lares, Harriet Flower offers a strikingly original account of these gods and a new way of understanding the lived experience of everyday Roman religion. Weaving together a wide range of evidence, Flower sets forth a new interpretation of the much-disputed nature of the lares. She makes the case that they are not spirits of the dead, as many have argued, but rather benevolent protectors—gods of place, especially the household and the neighborhood, and of travel. She examines the rituals honoring the lares, their cult sites, and their iconography, as well as the meaning of the snakes often depicted alongside lares in paintings of gardens. She also looks at Compitalia, a popular midwinter neighborhood festival in honor of the lares, and describes how its politics played a key role in Rome’s increasing violence in the 60s and 50s BC, as well as in the efforts of Augustus to reach out to ordinary people living in the city’s local neighborhoods. A reconsideration of seemingly humble gods that were central to the religious world of the Romans, this is also the first major account of the full range of lares worship in the homes, neighborhoods, and temples of ancient Rome. Some images inside the book are unavailable due to digital copyright restrictions.

Domesticating Empire by Caitlín Eilís Barrett

Title Domesticating Empire
Author Caitlín Eilís Barrett
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2019-03-29
Category Art
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780190641368
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Domesticating Empire is the first contextually-oriented monograph on Egyptian imagery in Roman households. Caitlín Barrett draws on case studies from Flavian Pompeii to investigate the close association between representations of Egypt and a particular type of Roman household space: the domestic garden. Through paintings and mosaics portraying the Nile, canals that turned the garden itself into a miniature "Nilescape," and statuary depicting Egyptian themes, many gardens in Pompeii offered ancient visitors evocations of a Roman vision of Egypt. Simultaneously faraway and familiar, these imagined landscapes made the unfathomable breadth of empire compatible with the familiarity of home. In contrast to older interpretations that connect Roman "Aegyptiaca" to the worship of Egyptian gods or the problematic concept of "Egyptomania," a contextual analysis of these garden assemblages suggests new possibilities for meaning. In Pompeian houses, Egyptian and Egyptian-looking objects and images interacted with their settings to construct complex entanglements of "foreign" and "familiar," "self" and "other." Representations of Egyptian landscapes in domestic gardens enabled individuals to present themselves as sophisticated citizens of empire. Yet at the same time, household material culture also exerted an agency of its own: domesticizing, familiarizing, and "Romanizing" once-foreign images and objects. That which was once imagined as alien and potentially dangerous was now part of the domus itself, increasingly incorporated into cultural constructions of what it meant to be "Roman." Featuring brilliant illustrations in both color and black and white, Domesticating Empire reveals the importance of material culture in transforming household space into a microcosm of empire.

Plautus Curculio by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad

Title Plautus Curculio
Author T. H. M. Gellar-Goad
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date 2021-01-14
Category Drama
Total Pages 200
ISBN 9781350079762
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is the first book-length study of Plautus' shortest surviving comedy, Curculio, a play in which the tricksy brown-nosed title character (“The Weevil”) bamboozles a shady banker and a pious pimp to secure the freedom of the enslaved girl his patron has fallen for while keeping her out of the clutches of a megalomaniacal soldier. It all takes place in the Greek city Epidaurus, the most important site for the worship of the healing god Aesculapius, an unusual setting for an ancient comedy. But a mid-play monologue by the stage manager shows us where the action really is: in the real-life Roman Forum, in the lives and low-lifes of the audience. This study explores the world of Curculio and the world of Plautus, with special attention to how the play was originally performed (including the first-ever comprehensive musical analysis of the play), the play's plots and themes, and its connections to ancient Roman cultural practices of love, sex, religion, food, and class. Plautus: Curculio also offers the first performance and reception history of the play: how it has survived through more than two millennia and its appearances in the modern world.

Title The Alternative Augustan Age
Author Josiah Osgood
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 2019-10
Category Art
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780190901400
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The princeps Augustus (63 BCE - 14 CE), recognized as the first of the Roman emperors, looms large in the teaching and writing of Roman history. Major political, literary, and artistic developments alike are attributed to him. This book deliberately and provocatively shifts the focus off Augustus while still looking at events of his time. Contributors uncover the perspectives and contributions of a range of individuals other than the princeps. Not all thought they were living in the "Augustan Age." Not all took their cues from Augustus. In their self-display or ideas for reform, some anticipated Augustus. Others found ways to oppose him that also helped to shape the future of their community. The volume challenges the very idea of an "Augustan Age" by breaking down traditional turning points and showing the continuous experimentation and development of these years to be in continuity with earlier Roman culture. In showcasing absences of Augustus and giving other figures their due, the papers here make a seemingly familiar period startlingly new.

Roman Republics by Harriet I. Flower

Title Roman Republics
Author Harriet I. Flower
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2011-09-26
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780691152585
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the Renaissance to today, the idea that the Roman Republic lasted more than 450 years--persisting unbroken from the late sixth century to the mid-first century BC--has profoundly shaped how Roman history is understood, how the ultimate failure of Roman republicanism is explained, and how republicanism itself is defined. In Roman Republics, Harriet Flower argues for a completely new interpretation of republican chronology. Radically challenging the traditional picture of a single monolithic republic, she argues that there were multiple republics, each with its own clearly distinguishable strengths and weaknesses. While classicists have long recognized that the Roman Republic changed and evolved over time, Flower is the first to mount a serious argument against the idea of republican continuity that has been fundamental to modern historical study. By showing that the Romans created a series of republics, she reveals that there was much more change--and much less continuity--over the republican period than has previously been assumed. In clear and elegant prose, Roman Republics provides not only a reevaluation of one of the most important periods in western history but also a brief yet nuanced survey of Roman political life from archaic times to the end of the republican era.

The Roman Conquest Of Italy by Jean-Michel David

Title The Roman Conquest of Italy
Author Jean-Michel David
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Release Date 1997
Category History
Total Pages 218
ISBN UOM:39015040602974
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The book opens with a description of the peoples of Italy at around the end of the fourth century B.C. It describes the early success of Roman diplomacy and force in creating client populations among the Etruscans, the Latins and the Hellenized populations of the south. At the beginning of the period the Italian peoples sought to preserve their independence and ethnic traditions. By its end those who had not achieved Roman citizenship were demanding it.

Security In Roman Times by Cecilia Ricci

Title Security in Roman Times
Author Cecilia Ricci
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2018-01-02
Category History
Total Pages 300
ISBN 9781317058021
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Using literary, epigraphic, numismatic and iconographic sources this book investigates the safety devices that were in place for the protection of the emperor and the city of Rome in the imperial age. In the aftermath of the civil wars Augustus continued to provide for his physical safety in the same way as in the old Republic while, at the same time, overturning the taboo of armed men in the city. During the Augustan age, the division of the city into 14 regions and 265 vici was designed to establish control over the urban space. Augustus’ successors consolidated his policy but the specific roles of the various military or paramilitary forces remain a matter for debate. Drawing on the testimony of ancient authors such as Tacitus and Suetonius and on material evidence, the volume examines both the circumstances in which these forces intervened and the strategies that they adopted. It also examines the pre-Augustan, Augustan and post-Augustan sense of ‘securitas’, both as a philosophical and a political concept. The final section expands the focus from the city of Rome to the Italian peninsula where the security of the emperor as he travelled to his country residences required advance planning and implementation.

Title The Ancient Roman Afterlife
Author Charles King
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2020-03-10
Category Religion
Total Pages 328
ISBN 9781477320228
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In ancient Rome, it was believed some humans were transformed into special, empowered beings after death. These deified dead, known as the manes, watched over and protected their surviving family members, possibly even extending those relatives’ lives. But unlike the Greek hero-cult, the worship of dead emperors, or the Christian saints, the manes were incredibly inclusive—enrolling even those without social clout, such as women and the poor, among Rome's deities. The Roman afterlife promised posthumous power in the world of the living. While the manes have often been glossed over in studies of Roman religion, this book brings their compelling story to the forefront, exploring their myriad forms and how their worship played out in the context of Roman religion’s daily practice. Exploring the place of the manes in Roman society, Charles King delves into Roman beliefs about their powers to sustain life and bring death to individuals or armies, examines the rituals the Romans performed to honor them, and reclaims the vital role the manes played in the ancient Roman afterlife.

Pantheon by Jörg Rüpke

Title Pantheon
Author Jörg Rüpke
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2020-11-03
Category History
Total Pages 576
ISBN 9780691211558
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From one of the world's leading authorities on the subject, an innovative and comprehensive account of religion in the ancient Roman and Mediterranean world In this ambitious and authoritative book, Jörg Rüpke provides a comprehensive and strikingly original narrative history of ancient Roman and Mediterranean religion over more than a millennium—from the late Bronze Age through the Roman imperial period and up to late antiquity. While focused primarily on the city of Rome, Pantheon fully integrates the many religious traditions found in the Mediterranean world, including Judaism and Christianity. This generously illustrated book is also distinguished by its unique emphasis on lived religion, a perspective that stresses how individuals’ experiences and practices transform religion into something different from its official form. The result is a radically new picture of Roman religion and of a crucial period in Western religion—one that influenced Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and even the modern idea of religion itself.

Title War and Imperialism in Republican Rome 327 70 B C
Author William Vernon Harris
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 1985
Category Fiction
Total Pages 293
ISBN 0198148666
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Between 327 and 70 B.C. the Romans expanded their empire throughout the Mediterranean world. This highly original study looks at Roman attitudes and behavior that lay behind their quest for power. How did Romans respond to warfare, year after year? How important were the material gains of military success--land, slaves, and other riches--commonly supposed to have been merely an incidental result? What value is there in the claim of the contemporary historian Polybius that the Romans were driven by a greater and greater ambition to expand their empire? The author answers these questions within an analytic framework, and comes to an interpretation of Roman imperialism that differs sharply from the conventional ones.

The Art Of Forgetting by Harriet I. Flower

Title The Art of Forgetting
Author Harriet I. Flower
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date 2006
Category History
Total Pages 400
ISBN 0807830631
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Elite Romans periodically chose to limit or destroy the memory of a leading citizen who was deemed an unworthy member of the community. Sanctions against memory could lead to the removal or mutilation of portraits and public inscriptions. Harriet Flower p

Household Gods by Alexandra Sofroniew

Title Household Gods
Author Alexandra Sofroniew
Publisher Getty Publications
Release Date 2016-02-15
Category Art
Total Pages 160
ISBN 9781606064566
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Daily religious devotion in the Greek and Roman worlds centered on the family and the home. Besides official worship in rural sacred areas and at temples in towns, the ancients kept household shrines with statuettes of different deities that could have a deep personal and spiritual meaning. Roman houses were often filled with images of gods. Gods and goddesses were represented in mythological paintings on walls and in decorative mosaics on floors, in bronze and marble sculptures, on ornate silver dining vessels, and on lowly clay oil lamps that lit dark rooms. Even many modest homes had one or more religious objects that were privately venerated. Ranging from the humble to the magnificent, these small objects could be fashioned in any medium from terracotta to precious metal or stone. Showcasing the collections in the Getty Villa, this book’s emphasis on the spiritual beliefs and practices of individuals promises to make the works of Greek and Roman art more accessible to readers. Compelling representations of private religious devotion, these small objects express personal ways of worshiping that are still familiar to us today. A chapter on contemporary domestic worship further enhances the relevance of these miniature sculptures for modern viewers.

Title The Lives of Peter the Iberian Theodosius of Jerusalem and the Monk Romanus
Author John Rufus (Bishop of Maiuma)
Publisher Society of Biblical Lit
Release Date 2008
Category Religion
Total Pages 370
ISBN 9781589832008
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book makes available for the first time in English important works by the anti-Chalcedonian historian and biographer John Rufus on Peter the Iberian, Theodosius of Jerusalem, and Abba Romanus, three key figures of the Christian history of Palestine in the fifth and early sixth centuries C.E. The work offers a new critical edition of the Syriac text; the first-ever published English translation; a substantial introduction to Palestinian monasticism, the christological controversies of the time, and the life and writings of John Rufus; and ample annotations to a Syriac text whose Greek original is no longer available. By providing access to the Christian landscape (literally and metaphorically) in late antique and early Byzantine times, this volume offers a valuable counterbalance from a minority perspective to the biographical and historical writings of the Chalcedonian apologist Cyril of Scythopolis.

Greek Gods Abroad by Robert Parker

Title Greek Gods Abroad
Author Robert Parker
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2017-05-23
Category History
Total Pages 261
ISBN 9780520967250
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From even before the time of Alexander the Great, the Greek gods spread throughout the Mediterranean, carried by settlers and largely adopted by the indigenous populations. By the third century b.c., gods bearing Greek names were worshipped everywhere from Spain to Afghanistan, with the resulting religious systems a variable blend of Greek and indigenous elements. Greek Gods Abroad examines the interaction between Greek religion and the cultures of the eastern Mediterranean with which it came into contact. Robert Parker shows how Greek conventions for naming gods were extended and adapted and provides bold new insights into religious and psychological values across the Mediterranean. The result is a rich portrait of ancient polytheism as it was practiced over 600 years of history.

Title The Early Roman Expansion into Italy
Author Nicola Terrenato
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2019-04-30
Category Art
Total Pages 348
ISBN 9781108422673
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Argues that Roman expansion in Italy was accomplished more by means of negotiation among local elites than through military conquest.

The Roman Street by Jeremy Hartnett

Title The Roman Street
Author Jeremy Hartnett
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2017-05-09
Category Architecture
Total Pages 329
ISBN 9781107105706
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this book, Jeremy Hartnett explores the role of the ancient Roman street as the primary venue for social performance and political negotiations.

Title The Cambridge Companion to the Roman Republic
Author Harriet I. Flower
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2014-06-23
Category History
Total Pages 520
ISBN 9781107032248
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This second edition examines all aspects of Roman history, and contains a new introduction, three new chapters and updated bibliographies.

Drawing Down The Moon by III Radcliffe G. G. Edmonds III

Title Drawing Down the Moon
Author III Radcliffe G. G. Edmonds III
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2019-07-02
Category History
Total Pages 496
ISBN 9780691156934
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An unparalleled exploration of magic in the Greco-Roman world What did magic mean to the people of ancient Greece and Rome? How did Greeks and Romans not only imagine what magic could do, but also use it to try to influence the world around them? In Drawing Down the Moon, Radcliffe Edmonds, one of the foremost experts on magic, religion, and the occult in the ancient world, provides the most comprehensive account of the varieties of phenomena labeled as magic in classical antiquity. Exploring why certain practices, images, and ideas were labeled as “magic” and set apart from “normal” kinds of practices, Edmonds gives insight into the shifting ideas of religion and the divine in the ancient past and in the later Western tradition. Using fresh approaches to the history of religions and the social contexts in which magic was exercised, Edmonds delves into the archaeological record and classical literary traditions to examine images of witches, ghosts, and demons as well as the fantastic powers of metamorphosis, erotic attraction, and reversals of nature, such as the famous trick of drawing down the moon. From prayer and divination to astrology and alchemy, Edmonds journeys through all manner of ancient magical rituals and paraphernalia—ancient tablets, spell books, bindings and curses, love charms and healing potions, and amulets and talismans. He considers the ways in which the Greco-Roman discourse of magic was formed amid the cultures of the ancient Mediterranean, including Egypt and the Near East. An investigation of the mystical and marvelous, Drawing Down the Moon offers an unparalleled record of the origins, nature, and functions of ancient magic.

The Perfect Way by Anna Bonus Kingsford

Title The Perfect Way
Author Anna Bonus Kingsford
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1882
Category Electronic book
Total Pages 342
ISBN UOM:39015063601424
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Ancestor Masks and Aristocratic Power in Roman Culture
Author Harriet I. Flower
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 1996
Category History
Total Pages 411
ISBN 0199240248
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the first comprehensive study of Roman ancestor masks in English, Harriet Flower explains the reasons behind the use of wax masks in the commemoration of politically prominent family members by the elite society of Rome. Flower traces the functional evolution of ancestor masks, from theirfirst attested appearance in the third century BC to their last mention in the sixth century AD, through the examination of literary sources in both prose and verse, legal texts, epigraphy, archaeology, numismatics, and art. It is by putting these masks, which were worn by actors at the funerals ofthe deceased, into their legal, social, and political context that Flower is able to elucidate their central position in the media of the time and their special meaning as symbols of power and prestige.