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The Black Death Transformed by Samuel Kline Cohn

Title The Black Death Transformed
Author Samuel Kline Cohn
Publisher Hodder Arnold
Release Date 2002
Category History
Total Pages 318
ISBN 0340706465
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Black Death in Europe, from its arrival in 1347-52 into the early modern period, has been seriously misunderstood. From a wide range of sources, this study argues that it was not the rat-based bubonic plague usually blamed, and considers its effect on European culture.

The Black Death Transformed by Samuel Kline Cohn

Title The Black Death Transformed
Author Samuel Kline Cohn
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2003-01-30
Category History
Total Pages 318
ISBN 0340706473
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A fascinating and groundbreaking study, challenging the view that the Black Death was the same as the modern rat-based bubonic plague.

The Black Death Transformed by Samuel Kline Cohn

Title The Black Death Transformed
Author Samuel Kline Cohn
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2002
Category Black Death
Total Pages 318
ISBN OCLC:1147990445
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title The Black Death and the Transformation of the West
Author David Herlihy
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 1997-09-28
Category History
Total Pages 128
ISBN 9780674744233
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Looking beyond the view of the plague as unmitigated catastrophe, Herlihy finds evidence for its role in the advent of new population controls, the establishment of universities, the spread of Christianity, the dissemination of vernacular cultures, and even the rise of nationalism. This book, which displays a distinguished scholar's masterly synthesis of diverse materials, reveals that the Black Death can be considered the cornerstone of the transformation of Europe.

The Black Death by Joseph Patrick Byrne

Title The Black Death
Author Joseph Patrick Byrne
Publisher Greenwood Publishing Group
Release Date 2004
Category History
Total Pages 231
ISBN 0313324921
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An ideal introduction and guide to the greatest natural disaster to ever curse humanity, replete with illustrations, biographical sketches, and primary documents. Presents medieval and modern perspectives of this disturbing yet fascinating tragic historical episode.

Epidemics And Society by Frank M. Snowden

Title Epidemics and Society
Author Frank M. Snowden
Publisher Yale University Press
Release Date 2019-10-22
Category Medical
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9780300249149
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A “brilliant and sobering” (Paul Kennedy, Wall Street Journal) look at the history and human costs of pandemic outbreaks The World Economic Forum #1 book to read for context on the coronavirus outbreak This sweeping exploration of the impact of epidemic diseases looks at how mass infectious outbreaks have shaped society, from the Black Death to today. In a clear and accessible style, Frank M. Snowden reveals the ways that diseases have not only influenced medical science and public health, but also transformed the arts, religion, intellectual history, and warfare. A multidisciplinary and comparative investigation of the medical and social history of the major epidemics, this volume touches on themes such as the evolution of medical therapy, plague literature, poverty, the environment, and mass hysteria. In addition to providing historical perspective on diseases such as smallpox, cholera, and tuberculosis, Snowden examines the fallout from recent epidemics such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Ebola and the question of the world’s preparedness for the next generation of diseases.

In The Wake Of The Plague by Norman F. Cantor

Title In the Wake of the Plague
Author Norman F. Cantor
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2014-10-14
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781439136027
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Much of what we know about the greatest medical disaster ever, the Black Plague of the fourteenth century, is wrong. The details of the Plague etched in the minds of terrified schoolchildren -- the hideous black welts, the high fever, and the final, awful end by respiratory failure -- are more or less accurate. But what the Plague really was, and how it made history, remain shrouded in a haze of myths. Norman Cantor, the premier historian of the Middle Ages, draws together the most recent scientific discoveries and groundbreaking historical research to pierce the mist and tell the story of the Black Death afresh, as a gripping, intimate narrative. In the Wake of the Plague presents a microcosmic view of the Plague in England (and on the continent), telling the stories of the men and women of the fourteenth century, from peasant to priest, and from merchant to king. Cantor introduces a fascinating cast of characters. We meet, among others, fifteen-year-old Princess Joan of England, on her way to Spain to marry a Castilian prince; Thomas of Birmingham, abbot of Halesowen, responsible for his abbey as a CEO is for his business in a desperate time; and the once-prominent landowner John le Strange, who sees the Black Death tear away his family's lands and then its very name as it washes, unchecked, over Europe in wave after wave. Cantor argues that despite the devastation that made the Plague so terrifying, the disease that killed more than 40 percent of Europe's population had some beneficial results. The often literal demise of the old order meant that new, more scientific thinking increasingly prevailed where church dogma had once reigned supreme. In effect, the Black Death heralded an intellectual revolution. There was also an explosion of art: tapestries became popular as window protection against the supposedly airborne virus, and a great number of painters responded to the Plague. Finally, the Black Death marked an economic sea change: the onset of what Cantor refers to as turbocapitalism; the peasants who survived the Plague thrived, creating Europe's first class of independent farmers. Here are those stories and others, in a tale of triumph coming out of the darkest horror, wrapped up in a scientific mystery that persists, in part, to this day. Cantor's portrait of the Black Death's world is pro-vocative and captivating. Not since Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror have medieval men and women been brought so vividly to life. The greatest popularizer of the Middle Ages has written the period's most fascinating narrative.

The Black Death by Graham Twigg

Title The Black Death
Author Graham Twigg
Publisher Schocken Books Incorporated
Release Date 1985
Category Black Death
Total Pages 254
ISBN UOM:39015009560569
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title The Black Death
Author NA NA
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2016-04-30
Category History
Total Pages 199
ISBN 9781137103499
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A fascinating account of the phenomenon known as the Black Death, this volume offers a wealth of documentary material focused on the initial outbreak of the plague that ravaged the world in the 14th century. A comprehensive introduction that provides important background on the origins and spread of the plague is followed by nearly 50 documents organized into topical sections that focus on the origin and spread of the illness; the responses of medical practitioners; the societal and economic impact; religious responses; the flagellant movement and attacks on Jews provoked by the plague; and the artistic response. Each chapter has an introduction that summarizes the issues explored in the documents; headnotes to the documents provide additional background material. The book contains documents from many countries - including Muslim and Byzantine sources - to give students a variety of perspectives on this devastating illness and its consequences. The volume also includes illustrations, a chronology of the Black Death, and questions to consider.

Cultures Of Plague by Cohn Jr.

Title Cultures of Plague
Author Cohn Jr.
Publisher OUP Oxford
Release Date 2011-03-31
Category History
Total Pages 356
ISBN 9780191615887
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Cultures of Plague opens a new chapter in the history of medicine. Neither the plague nor the ideas it stimulated were static, fixed in a timeless Galenic vacuum over five centuries, as historians and scientists commonly assume. As plague evolved in its pathology, modes of transmission, and the social characteristics of its victims, so too did medical thinking about plague develop. This study of plague imprints from academic medical treatises to plague poetry highlights the most feared and devastating epidemic of the sixteenth-century, one that threatened Italy top to toe from 1575 to 1578 and unleashed an avalanche of plague writing. From erudite definitions, remote causes, cures and recipes, physicians now directed their plague writings to the prince and discovered their most 'valiant remedies' in public health: strict segregation of the healthy and ill, cleaning streets and latrines, addressing the long-term causes of plague-poverty. Those outside the medical profession joined the chorus. In the heartland of Counter-Reformation Italy, physicians along with those outside the profession questioned the foundations of Galenic and Renaissance medicine, even the role of God. Assaults on medieval and Renaissance medicine did not need to await the Protestant-Paracelsian alliance of seventeenth-century in northern Europe. Instead, creative forces planted by the pandemic of 1575-8 sowed seeds of doubt and unveiled new concerns and ideas within that supposedly most conservative form of medical writing, the plague tract. Relying on health board statistics and dramatized with eyewitness descriptions of bizarre happenings, human misery, and suffering, these writers created the structure for plague classics of the eighteenth century, and by tracking the contagion's complex and crooked paths, they anticipated trends of nineteenth-century epidemiology.

Epidemics by Samuel Kline Cohn, Jr.

Title Epidemics
Author Samuel Kline Cohn, Jr.
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2018-04-05
Category History
Total Pages 656
ISBN 9780198819660
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this study, Samuel K. Cohn, Jr. investigates hundreds of descriptions of epidemics reaching back before the fifth-century-BCE Plague of Athens to the 2014 Ebola outbreak to challenge the dominant hypothesis that epidemics invariably provoke hatred, blaming of the 'other', and victimizing bearers of epidemic diseases.

Title Return of the Black Death
Author Susan Scott
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Release Date 2007-12-10
Category History
Total Pages 318
ISBN 9780470338995
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

If the twenty-first century seems an unlikely stage for the return of a 14th-century killer, the authors of Return of the Black Death argue that the plague, which vanquished half of Europe, has only lain dormant, waiting to emerge again—perhaps, in another form. At the heart of their chilling scenario is their contention that the plague was spread by direct human contact (not from rat fleas) and was, in fact, a virus perhaps similar to AIDS and Ebola. Noting the periodic occurrence of plagues throughout history, the authors predict its inevitable re-emergence sometime in the future, transformed by mass mobility and bioterrorism into an even more devastating killer.

The Black Death by John Hatcher

Title The Black Death
Author John Hatcher
Publisher ReadHowYouWant.com
Release Date 2010-07-13
Category
Total Pages 556
ISBN 9781458782175
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this fresh approach to the history of the Black Death, John Hatcher, a world-renowned scholar of the Middle Ages, recreates everyday life in a mid-fourteenth century rural English village. By focusing on the experiences of ordinary villagers as they lived - and died - during the Black Death (1345 - 50 AD), Hatcher vividly places the reader directly into those tumultuous years and describes in fascinating detail the day-to-day existence of people struggling with the tragic effects of the plague. Dramatic scenes portray how contemporaries must have experienced and thought about the momentous events - and how they tried to make sense of it all.

Title The Black Death in Egypt and England
Author Stuart J. Borsch
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2009-09-15
Category Medical
Total Pages 207
ISBN 9780292783171
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Throughout the fourteenth century AD/eighth century H, waves of plague swept out of Central Asia and decimated populations from China to Iceland. So devastating was the Black Death across the Old World that some historians have compared its effects to those of a nuclear holocaust. As countries began to recover from the plague during the following century, sharp contrasts arose between the East, where societies slumped into long-term economic and social decline, and the West, where technological and social innovation set the stage for Europe's dominance into the twentieth century. Why were there such opposite outcomes from the same catastrophic event? In contrast to previous studies that have looked to differences between Islam and Christianity for the solution to the puzzle, this pioneering work proposes that a country's system of landholding primarily determined how successfully it recovered from the calamity of the Black Death. Stuart Borsch compares the specific cases of Egypt and England, countries whose economies were based in agriculture and whose pre-plague levels of total and agrarian gross domestic product were roughly equivalent. Undertaking a thorough analysis of medieval economic data, he cogently explains why Egypt's centralized and urban landholding system was unable to adapt to massive depopulation, while England's localized and rural landholding system had fully recovered by the year 1500.

Title English Law in the Age of the Black Death 1348 1381
Author Robert C. Palmer
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date 2001-02-01
Category Law
Total Pages 472
ISBN 0807849545
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Robert Palmer's pathbreaking study shows how the Black Death triggered massive changes in both governance and law in fourteenth-century England, establishing the mechanisms by which the law adapted to social needs for centuries thereafter. The Black De

Title The Black Death 1348 1350 A Brief History with Documents
Author John Aberth
Publisher Bedford
Release Date 2005-02-01
Category History
Total Pages 200
ISBN 031240087X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This new text offers a wealth of documentary material focused on the initial outbreak of the plague that ravaged the world in the 14th century. A comprehensive introduction providing background on the origins and spread of the Black Death is followed by nearly 50 documents covering the responses of medical practitioners; the social and economic impact; religious responses. Each chapter has an introduction that summarizes the issues explored in the documents and headnotes to provide additional background material. The book contains documents from many countries - including Muslim and Byzantine sources - to give students a variety of perspectives on this devastating illness and its consequences.

The Barbary Plague by Marilyn Chase

Title The Barbary Plague
Author Marilyn Chase
Publisher Random House Trade Paperbacks
Release Date 2004
Category History
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780375757082
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A science reporter for The Wall Street Journal describes an epidemic of bubonic plague that erupted in turn-of-the-century San Francisco, first in 1900 and then five years later, and the efforts of scientists Joseph Kinyoun, Dr. Rupert Blue, and Blue's aide Colby Rucker to contain the disease, discover its source, and eradicate it from the city. Reprint. 15,000 first printing.

Title Plague and Empire in the Early Modern Mediterranean World
Author Nükhet Varlik
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2015-07-22
Category History
Total Pages 360
ISBN 9781107013384
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is the first systematic scholarly study of the Ottoman experience of plague during the Black Death pandemic and the centuries that followed. Using a wealth of archival and narrative sources, including medical treatises, hagiographies, and travelers' accounts, as well as recent scientific research, Nükhet Varlik demonstrates how plague interacted with the environmental, social, and political structures of the Ottoman Empire from the late medieval through the early modern era. The book argues that the empire's growth transformed the epidemiological patterns of plague by bringing diverse ecological zones into interaction and by intensifying the mobilities of exchange among both human and non-human agents. Varlik maintains that persistent plagues elicited new forms of cultural imagination and expression, as well as a new body of knowledge about the disease. In turn, this new consciousness sharpened the Ottoman administrative response to the plague, while contributing to the makings of an early modern state.

Title Natural Disasters in the Ottoman Empire
Author Yaron Ayalon
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2014-11-24
Category History
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9781107072978
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Yaron Ayalon explores the Ottoman Empire's history of natural disasters and its responses on a state, communal, and individual level.

Black Death by Robert S. Gottfried

Title Black Death
Author Robert S. Gottfried
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2010-05-11
Category History
Total Pages 203
ISBN 1439118469
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A fascinating work of detective history, The Black Death traces the causes and far-reaching consequences of this infamous outbreak of plague that spread across the continent of Europe from 1347 to 1351. Drawing on sources as diverse as monastic manuscripts and dendrochronological studies (which measure growth rings in trees), historian Robert S. Gottfried demonstrates how a bacillus transmitted by rat fleas brought on an ecological reign of terror -- killing one European in three, wiping out entire villages and towns, and rocking the foundation of medieval society and civilization.