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The Aztec Image Of Self And Society by Miguel León Portilla

Title The Aztec Image of Self and Society
Author Miguel León Portilla
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1992
Category History
Total Pages 248
ISBN UVA:X002102805
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Latin American Thought by Susana Nuccetelli

Title Latin American Thought
Author Susana Nuccetelli
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2018-03-05
Category Political Science
Total Pages 292
ISBN 9780429967887
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Latin American Thought examines the relationship between philosophy and rationality in Latin American thought, the nature of justice, human rights, and cultural identity, and other questions that have concerned Latin American thinkers from the colonial period to the present day. From the Mayans, Aztecs, and Incas to the present day, reveals the assembly of interesting philosophical arguments offered by Latin Americans. Nuccetelli traces Latin American thought through questions concerning rationality, gender discrimination, justice, human rights, reparation for historically dispossessed peoples, and relativism vs. universalism - all matters of continuing concern in Spanish and Portuguese-speaking parts of the world . Amongst issues of heated controversy from the early twentieth century to the present, also explores how Latin Americans and their descendants abroad think of their own cultural identity, of US mass-culture and philosophy, and of the vexing problem of which name, if any, to use when referring to this exceedingly diverse ethnic group. Many of the philosophical questions raised by Latin American thinkers are problems that have concerned philosophers at different times and in different places throughout the Western tradition. But in fact the issues are not altogether the same - for they have been adapted to capture problems presented by new circumstances, and Latin Americans have sought resolutions in ways that are indeed novel. This book explains how well-established philosophical traditions gave rise in the "New World" to a distinctive manner of thinking. There was no clean sweep of the past and an attempt to start over: rather, Latin American thinkers mostly welcomed European ideas at whatever pace such traditions happened to arrive. It is then no surprise that, for instance, Scholasticism became the accepted view under Spanish rule, and began to lose its grip only when the rulers did. But what does seem surprising is the radical way in which those traditions were transformed to account for problems that, though familiar, were now seen intake light of new circumstances. A distinctive Latin American way of thinking about such problems emerged from the project of "recycling" European philosophical traditions, some of which were already obsolete in Europe at the time their transplant took place. Thus theories commonly taken to be incompatible within Western traditions in philosophy were absorbed by Latin American thought-- and, in their newly acquired forms, such theories are even now at the basis of proposed solutions to many practical and philosophical problems. The book explores that recycling process. Above all, it aims to determine whether the various cultures that met in the "New World" could now be said to have come to share a common identity. This is in fact an issue which has preoccupied Latin Americans since at least the beginning of the 19th century, when their countries won their independence. But, in connection with this, it is also important to ask how Latin Americans have thought about the relationship between philosophy and rationality, and about other issues belonging to the major areas of philosophy such as epistemology, moral philosophy, and political philosophy, as well their application to vital social issues, including education and the emancipation of women. These are all taken up by the author, who pays special attention to questions of gender discrimination, justice, human rights, reparation for historically dispossessed peoples, and the role of education-- all matters of continuing concern in Latin American thought, from its earliest stirrings to the present day.

From Indians To Chicanos by James Diego Vigil

Title From Indians to Chicanos
Author James Diego Vigil
Publisher Waveland Press
Release Date 2011-11-02
Category Social Science
Total Pages 349
ISBN 9781478634836
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Anthropologist-historian James Diego Vigil distills an enormous amount of information to provide a perceptive ethnohistorical introduction to the Mexican-American experience in the United States. He uses brief, clear outlines of each stage of Mexican-American history, charting the culture change sequences in the Pre-Columbian, Spanish Colonial, Mexican Independence and Nationalism, and Anglo-American and Mexicanization periods. In a very understandable fashion, he analyzes events and the underlying conditions that affect them. Readers become fully engaged with the historical developments and the specific socioeconomic, sociocultural, and sociopsychological forces involved in the dynamics that shaped contemporary Chicano life. Considered a pioneering achievement when first published, From Indians to Chicanos continues to offer readers an informed and penetrating approach to the history of Chicano development. The richly illustrated Third Edition incorporates data from the latest literature. Moreover, a new chapter updates discussions of immigration, institutional discrimination, the Mexicanization of the Chicano population, and issues of gender, labor, and education.

Portraying The Aztec Past by Angela Herren Rajagopalan

Title Portraying the Aztec Past
Author Angela Herren Rajagopalan
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2018-12-12
Category Art
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9781477316078
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

During the period of Aztec expansion and empire (ca. 1325–1525), scribes of high social standing used a pictographic writing system to paint hundreds of manuscripts detailing myriad aspects of life, including historical, calendric, and religious information. Following the Spanish conquest, native and mestizo tlacuiloque (artist-scribes) of the sixteenth century continued to use pre-Hispanic pictorial writing systems to record information about native culture. Three of these manuscripts—Codex Boturini, Codex Azcatitlan, and Codex Aubin—document the origin and migration of the Mexica people, one of several indigenous groups often collectively referred to as “Aztec.” In Portraying the Aztec Past, Angela Herren Rajagopalan offers a thorough study of these closely linked manuscripts, articulating their narrative and formal connections and examining differences in format, style, and communicative strategies. Through analyses that focus on the materials, stylistic traits, facture, and narrative qualities of the codices, she places these annals in their historical and social contexts. Her work adds to our understanding of the production and function of these manuscripts and explores how Mexica identity is presented and framed after the conquest.

Title The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas
Author Bruce G. Trigger
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 1996
Category History
Total Pages 571
ISBN 0521351650
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Cambridge History of the Native Peoples of the Americas, Volume II: Mesoamerica, gives a comprehensive and authoritative overview of all the important native civilizations of the Mesoamerican area, beginning with archaeological discussions of paleoindian, archaic and preclassic societies and continuing to the present. Fully illustrated and engagingly written, the book is divided into sections that discuss the native cultures of Mesoamerica before and after their first contact with the Europeans. The various chapters balance theoretical points of view as they trace the cultural history and evolutionary development of such groups as the Olmec, the Maya, the Aztec, the Zapotec, and the Tarascan.

Title Non Western Educational Traditions
Author Timothy G. Reagan
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2004-09-22
Category Education
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9781135615673
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This text provides a brief yet comprehensive overview of a number of non-Western approaches to educational thought and practice. Its premise is that understanding the ways that other people educate their children--as well as what counts for them as "education"--may help us think more clearly about some of our own assumptions and values, and to become more open to alternative viewpoints about important educational matters. The value of this informative, mind-opening text for preservice and in-service teacher education courses is enhanced by "Questions for Discussion and Reflection" and "Recommended Further Readings" included in each chapter. New in the Third Edition: *Chapter 2, "Conceptualizing Culture:" 'I, We, and The Other,' is new to this edition. It is a response to feedback about the problems inherent in our general discourse about "culture," and in addition provides an example of a culture that is near to us but nevertheless alien-the culture of the Deaf-World. *Chapter 9-which deals with Islam and traditional Muslim education-has been substantially revised. *The subtitle of the Third Edition has been changed to Indigenous Approaches to Educational Thought and Practice, reflecting not so much a change in the emphases found in the book, but rather, a recognition of the growing scholarly interest in indigenous peoples, their languages, cultures, and histories. *Various points throughout the text have been expanded and clarified, and chapters have been updated as needed.

Moctezuma S Children by Donald E. Chipman

Title Moctezuma s Children
Author Donald E. Chipman
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2010-01-01
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780292782648
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Though the Aztec Empire fell to Spain in 1521, three principal heirs of the last emperor, Moctezuma II, survived the conquest and were later acknowledged by the Spanish victors as reyes naturales (natural kings or monarchs) who possessed certain inalienable rights as Indian royalty. For their part, the descendants of Moctezuma II used Spanish law and customs to maintain and enhance their status throughout the colonial period, achieving titles of knighthood and nobility in Mexico and Spain. So respected were they that a Moctezuma descendant by marriage became Viceroy of New Spain (colonial Mexico's highest governmental office) in 1696. This authoritative history follows the fortunes of the principal heirs of Moctezuma II across nearly two centuries. Drawing on extensive research in both Mexican and Spanish archives, Donald E. Chipman shows how daughters Isabel and Mariana and son Pedro and their offspring used lawsuits, strategic marriages, and political maneuvers and alliances to gain pensions, rights of entailment, admission to military orders, and titles of nobility from the Spanish government. Chipman also discusses how the Moctezuma family history illuminates several larger issues in colonial Latin American history, including women's status and opportunities and trans-Atlantic relations between Spain and its New World colonies.

Title Urban Images of the Hispanic World 1493 1793
Author Richard L. Kagan
Publisher Yale University Press
Release Date 2000-01-01
Category Political Science
Total Pages 235
ISBN 0300083149
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This fascinating book examines the particular importance of cities in Spanish and Hispanic-American culture as well as the different meanings that artists and cartographers invested in their depiction of New and Old Wold cities and towns. Kagan maintains that cities are both built human structures and human communities, and that representations of the urban form reflect both points of view. He discusses the peculiar character of Spain's empire of towns; the history and development of the cityscape as an independent artistic genre, both in Europe and the Americas; the interaction between European and native mapping traditions; differences between European maps of urban America and those produced by local residents, whether native or creole; and the urban iconography of four different New World towns. Lavishly illustrated with a variety of maps, pictures, and plans, many reproduced here for the first time, this interdisciplinary study will be of interest to general readers and to specialists in art history, cartography, history, urbanism, and related fields.

Title Aztec Religion and Art of Writing
Author Isabel Laack
Publisher BRILL
Release Date 2019-03-27
Category Religion
Total Pages 456
ISBN 9789004392014
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Laack’s study presents an innovative interpretation of Aztec religion and art of writing. She explores the Nahua sense of reality from the perspective of the aesthetics of religion and analyzes Indigenous semiotics and embodied meaning in Mesoamerican pictorial writing.

Title Music and Historical Critique
Author Gary Tomlinson
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2017-07-05
Category Music
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781351557764
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Music and Historical Critique provides a definitive collection of Gary Tomlinson's influential studies on critical musicology, with the watchword throughout being history. This collection gathers his most innovative essays and lectures, some of them published here for the first time, along with an introduction outlining the context of the contributions and commenting on their aims and significance. Music and Historical Critique provides a retrospective view of the author's achievements in bringing to the heart of musicological discourse both deep-seated experiences of the past and meditations on the historian's ways of understanding them.

Title Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and His Legacy
Author Galen Brokaw
Publisher University of Arizona Press
Release Date 2016-05-12
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 306
ISBN 9780816500727
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"The book provides an overview of the life, work, and legacy of Fernando de Alva Ixtlilxochitl and revises and expands our understanding of his racial and cultural identity, his method of transcribing pictorial texts, his treatment of gender, and his influence on Mexican nationalism, offering many insights on Aztec and Mexican history and culture"--Provided by publisher.

Aztec Philosophy by James Maffie

Title Aztec Philosophy
Author James Maffie
Publisher University Press of Colorado
Release Date 2014-03-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9781607322238
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In Aztec Philosophy, James Maffie shows the Aztecs advanced a highly sophisticated and internally coherent systematic philosophy worthy of consideration alongside other philosophies from around the world. Bringing together the fields of comparative world philosophy and Mesoamerican studies, Maffie excavates the distinctly philosophical aspects of Aztec thought. Aztec Philosophy focuses on the ways Aztec metaphysics—the Aztecs’ understanding of the nature, structure and constitution of reality—underpinned Aztec thinking about wisdom, ethics, politics,\ and aesthetics, and served as a backdrop for Aztec religious practices as well as everyday activities such as weaving, farming, and warfare. Aztec metaphysicians conceived reality and cosmos as a grand, ongoing process of weaving—theirs was a world in motion. Drawing upon linguistic, ethnohistorical, archaeological, historical, and contemporary ethnographic evidence, Maffie argues that Aztec metaphysics maintained a processive, transformational, and non-hierarchical view of reality, time, and existence along with a pantheistic theology. Aztec Philosophy will be of great interest to Mesoamericanists, philosophers, religionists, folklorists, and Latin Americanists as well as students of indigenous philosophy, religion, and art of the Americas.

Title New Frontiers in Guadalupan Studies
Author Virgilio Elizondo
Publisher Wipf and Stock Publishers
Release Date 2014-09-18
Category Religion
Total Pages 170
ISBN 9781630874988
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Historical writings on Our Lady of Guadalupe, the most revered sacred figure indigenous to the western hemisphere, have tended to focus on the sixteenth-century origins of her cult. But recent publications have increasingly extended Guadalupan studies beyond the origin debates to analyses of the subsequent evolution and immense influence of the Guadalupe tradition. New Frontiers in Guadalupan Studies significantly enhances this growing body of literature with insightful essays on topics that span the early stages of Guadalupan devotion to the milestone of Pope Benedict XIV establishing an official liturgical feast for Guadalupe in 1754. The volume also breaks new ground in theological analyses of Guadalupe, which comprise an ongoing effort to articulate a Christian response to one of the most momentous events of Christianity's second millennium: the conquest, evangelization, and struggles for life, dignity, and self-determination of the peoples of the Americas.

Title Subject and Object in Renaissance Culture
Author Margreta de Grazia
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 1996-02-23
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 398
ISBN 0521455898
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

These essays by leading scholars offer a new focus on the Renaissance via objects rather than subjects.

Movements In Chicano Poetry by Rafael Pèrez-Torres

Title Movements in Chicano Poetry
Author Rafael Pèrez-Torres
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 1995-01-27
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 332
ISBN 0521478030
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Studies the central concerns addressed by recent Chicano poetry.

Title Time History and Belief in Aztec and Colonial Mexico
Author Ross Hassig
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2013-12-18
Category Social Science
Total Pages 238
ISBN 9780292749023
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Based on their enormously complex calendars that recorded cycles of many kinds, the Aztecs and other ancient Mesoamerican civilizations are generally believed to have had a cyclical, rather than linear, conception of time and history. This boldly revisionist book challenges that understanding. Ross Hassig offers convincing evidence that for the Aztecs time was predominantly linear, that it was manipulated by the state as a means of controlling a dispersed tribute empire, and that the Conquest cut off state control and severed the unity of the calendar, leaving only the lesser cycles. From these, he asserts, we have inadequately reconstructed the pre-Columbian calendar and so misunderstood the Aztec conception of time and history. Hassig first presents the traditional explanation of the Aztec calendrical system and its ideological functions and then marshals contrary evidence to argue that the Aztec elite deliberately used calendars and timekeeping to achieve practical political ends. He further traces how the Conquest played out in the temporal realm as Spanish conceptions of time partially displaced the Aztec ones. His findings promise to revolutionize our understanding of how the Aztecs and other Mesoamerican societies conceived of time and history.

Visions Of Paradise by Robert Stephen Haskett

Title Visions of Paradise
Author Robert Stephen Haskett
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2005
Category Social Science
Total Pages 420
ISBN 0806135867
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Cuernavaca, often called the “Mexican Paradise” or “Land of Eternal Spring,” has a deep, rich history. Few visitors to this modern resort city near Mexico City would guess from its Spanish architecture and landmarks that it was governed by its Tlalhuican residents until the early nineteenth century. Formerly called Cuauhnahuac, the city was renamed by the Spanish in the sixteenth century when Hernando Cortés built his stone palacio on its main square and thrust Cuernavaca into the colonial age. In Visions of Paradise, Robert Haskett presents a history of Cuernavaca, basing his account on an important body of late-seventeenth-century historical records known as primordial titles, written by still unknown members of the Native population. Until comparatively recently, these indigenous-language documents have been dismissed as “false” or “forged” land records. Haskett, however, uses these Nahuatl texts to present a colorful portrait of how the Tlalhuicas of Cuernavaca and its environs made intellectual sense of their place in the colonial scheme, conceived of their relationship to the sacred worlds of both their native religion and Christianity, and defined their own history. Surveying the local history of Cuernavaca from precontact observations by the Aztecs through postclassic times to the present, with a concentration on early colonial times, Haskett finds that the Native authors of the primordial titles crafted a celebratory history proclaiming themselves to be an enduringly autonomous, essentially unconquered people who triumphed over the rigors of the Spanish colonial system.

Chicano Drama by Jorge Huerta

Title Chicano Drama
Author Jorge Huerta
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2000-11-16
Category Drama
Total Pages 209
ISBN 0521778174
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An accessible introduction for students and theatregoers of Chicano theatre, first published in 2000.

Eros Ideologies by Laura E. Pérez

Title Eros Ideologies
Author Laura E. Pérez
Publisher Duke University Press
Release Date 2019-10-11
Category Social Science
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780822372370
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In Eros Ideologies Laura E. Pérez explores the decolonial through Western and non-Western thought concerning personal and social well-being. Drawing upon Jungian, people-of-color, and spiritual psychology alongside non-Western spiritual philosophies of the interdependence of all life-forms, she writes of the decolonial as an ongoing project rooted in love as an ideology to frame respectful coexistence of social and cultural diversity. In readings of art that includes self-portraits by Frida Kahlo, Ana Mendieta, and Yreina D. Cervántez, the drawings and paintings of Chilean American artist Liliana Wilson, and Favianna Rodriguez's screen-printed images, Pérez identifies art as one of the most valuable laboratories for creating, imagining, and experiencing new forms of decolonial thought. Such art expresses what Pérez calls eros ideologies: understandings of social and natural reality that foreground the centrality of respect and care of self and others as the basis for a more democratic and responsible present and future. Employing a range of writing styles and voices—from the poetic to the scholarly—Pérez shows how art can point to more just and loving ways of being.

Tlacaelel Remembered by Susan Schroeder

Title Tlacaelel Remembered
Author Susan Schroeder
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2016-11-16
Category History
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9780806157658
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The enigmatic and powerful Tlacaelel (1398–1487), wrote annalist Chimalpahin, was “the beginning and origin” of the Mexica monarchy in fifteenth-century Mesoamerica. Brother of the first Moteuczoma, Tlacaelel would become “the most powerful, feared, and esteemed man of all that the world had seen up to that time.” But this outsize figure of Aztec history has also long been shrouded in mystery. In Tlacaelel Remembered, the first biography of the Mexica nobleman, Susan Schroeder searches out the truth about his life and legacy. A century after Tlacaelel’s death, in the wake of the conquistadors, Spaniards and natives recorded the customs, histories, and language of the Nahua, or Aztec, people. Three of these chroniclers—fray Diego Durán, don Hernando Alvarado Tezozomoc, and especially don Domingo de San Antón Muñón Chimalpahin Quauhtlehuanitzin—wrote of Tlacaelel. But the inaccessibility of Chimalpahin’s annals has meant that for centuries of Aztec history, Tlacaelel has appeared, if at all, as a myth. Working from Chimalpahin’s newly available writings and exploring connections and variances in other source materials, Schroeder draws the clearest possible portrait of Tlacaelel, revealing him as the architect of the Aztec empire’s political power and its military might—a politician on par with Machiavelli. As the advisor to five Mexica rulers, Tlacaelel shaped the organization of the Mexica state and broadened the reach of its empire—feats typically accomplished with the spread of warfare, human sacrifice, and cannibalism. In the annals, he is considered the “second king” to the rulers who built the empire, and is given the title “Cihuacoatl,” used for the office of president and judge. As Schroeder traces Tlacaelel through the annals, she also examines how his story was transmitted and transformed in later histories. The resulting work is the most complete and comprehensive account ever given of this significant figure in Mesoamerican history.