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The Americans by Anonim

Title The Americans
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2008
Category
Total Pages 177
ISBN OCLC:1055287312
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title Robert Frank s The Americans
Author Jonathan Day
Publisher Intellect Books
Release Date 2011-04-27
Category Social Science
Total Pages 200
ISBN 9781841504469
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the mid-1950s, Swiss-born New Yorker Robert Frank embarked on a ten-thousand-mile road trip across America, capturing thousands of photographs of all levels of a rapidly changing society. The resultant photo book, The Americans, represents a seminal moment in both photography and in America's understanding of itself. To mark the book’s fiftieth anniversary, Jonathan Day revisits this pivotal work and contributes a thoughtful and revealing critical commentary. Though the importance of The Americans has been widely acknowledged, it still retains much of its mystery. This comprehensive analysis places it thoroughly in the context of contemporary photography, literature, music, and advertising from its own period through the present.

The American by Henry James

Title The American
Author Henry James
Publisher Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release Date 2017-02-11
Category
Total Pages 330
ISBN 1543072267
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The American A social comedy about Christopher Newman, an American businessman on his first tour of Europe. Along the way, he finds a widow from an aristocratic French family.

Title The Americans The Democratic Experience
Author Daniel J. Boorstin
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2010-11-03
Category History
Total Pages 736
ISBN 9780307756497
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize. A study of the last 100 years of American history.

The Day Of The Americans by Nerin E. Gun

Title The Day of the Americans
Author Nerin E. Gun
Publisher Fleet PressCorp
Release Date 1966
Category
Total Pages 317
ISBN UOM:39015019985376
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Eye-witness account of daily life at the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau, Germany, before, during and following its liberation by U.S. forces on April 29, 1945.

The Other Americans by Laila Lalami

Title The Other Americans
Author Laila Lalami
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2019-03-26
Category Fiction
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781524747152
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

***2019 NATIONAL BOOK AWARD FINALIST*** Winner of the Arab American Book Award in Fiction Finalist for the Kirkus Prize in Fiction Finalist for the California Book Award Longlisted for the Aspen Words Literary Prize A Los Angeles Times bestseller Named a Best Book of the Year by The Washington Post, Time, NPR, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Dallas Morning News, The Guardian, Variety, and Kirkus Reviews Late one spring night in California, Driss Guerraoui—father, husband, business owner, Moroccan immigrant—is hit and killed by a speeding car. The aftermath of his death brings together a diverse cast of characters: Guerraoui's daughter Nora, a jazz composer returning to the small town in the Mojave she thought she'd left for good; her mother, Maryam, who still pines for her life in the old country; Efraín, an undocumented witness whose fear of deportation prevents him from coming forward; Jeremy, an old friend of Nora’s and an Iraqi War veteran; Coleman, a detective who is slowly discovering her son’s secrets; Anderson, a neighbor trying to reconnect with his family; and the murdered man himself. As the characters—deeply divided by race, religion, and class—tell their stories, each in their own voice, connections among them emerge. Driss’s family confronts its secrets, a town faces its hypocrisies, and love—messy and unpredictable—is born. Timely, riveting, and unforgettable, The Other Americans is at once a family saga, a murder mystery, and a love story informed by the treacherous fault lines of American culture.

The Quiet Americans by Scott Anderson

Title The Quiet Americans
Author Scott Anderson
Publisher Signal
Release Date 2020-09-01
Category History
Total Pages 448
ISBN 9780771009150
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the bestselling author of Lawrence in Arabia, a gripping history of the early years of the Cold War, the CIA's covert battles against communism, and the tragic consequences which still affect the world today At the end of World War II, the United States dominated the world militarily, economically, and in moral standing--seen as the victor over tyranny and a champion of freedom. But it was clear--to some--that the Soviet Union was already executing a plan to expand and foment revolution around the world. The American government's strategy in response relied on the secret efforts of a newly-formed CIA. The Quiet Americans chronicles the exploits of four spies--Michael Burke, a charming former football star fallen on hard times; Frank Wisner, the scion of a wealthy Southern family; Peter Sichel, a sophisticated German Jew who escaped the Nazis; and Edward Lansdale, a brilliant ad executive. The four ran covert operations across the globe, trying to outwit the ruthless KGB in Berlin, parachuting commandos into Eastern Europe, plotting coups, and directing wars against Communist insurgents in Asia. But time and again their efforts went awry, thwarted by a combination of stupidity and ideological rigidity at the highest levels of the government--and more profoundly, the decision to abandon American ideals. By the mid-1950s, the Soviet Union had a stranglehold on Eastern Europe, the U.S. had begun its disastrous intervention in Vietnam, and America, the beacon of democracy, was overthrowing democratically-elected governments and earning the hatred of much of the world. All of this culminated in an act of betrayal and cowardice that would lock the Cold War into place for decades to come. Anderson brings to the telling of this story all the narrative brio, deep research, skeptical eye, and lively prose that made Lawrence in Arabia a major international bestseller. The intertwined lives of these men began in a common purpose of defending freedom, but the ravages of the Cold War led them to different fates. Two would quit the CIA in despair, stricken by the moral compromises they had to make; one became the archetype of the duplicitous and destructive American spy; and one would be so heartbroken he would take his own life. The Quiet Americans is the story of these four men. It is also the story of how the United States, at the very pinnacle of its power, managed to snatch defeat from the jaws of victory.

Domestic Manners Of The Americans by Frances Milton Trollope

Title Domestic Manners of the Americans
Author Frances Milton Trollope
Publisher Courier Corporation
Release Date 2003-01-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 254
ISBN 0486431398
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Frances Trollope, mother of the great Victorian novelist Anthony Trollope, wrote more than 40 books in her lifetime, including landmark novels dealing with important social issues. She is best known today, however, for this witty, entertaining, and controversial account of American life and culture. Published in 1832, this book presents a lively portrait of early nineteenth-century America as observed by a woman of rare intelligence and keen perception. The author left no stone unturned, commenting on American dress, food, speech, politics, manners, customs, the landscape, architecture, and more.

Title The Americans and the French
Author Crane Brinton
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2013-10-01
Category
Total Pages 312
ISBN 0674188489
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title The Americans in the Great War Vol II
Author Michelin Guides
Publisher Andrews UK Limited
Release Date 2012-10-29
Category History
Total Pages 146
ISBN 9781781505694
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Volume II of III This volume is sub-titled The Battle of St Mihiel, and covers St Mihiel, Pont a Mouson and Metz. The first 18 pages provide the historical background, how the St Mihiel salient was formed in September 1914 and how it was eventually eliminated four years later, in September 1918. Details of the American forces (corps and divisions) involved are given with photos of some of their commanders. Then follow the outlines of three guided tours round the battlefields with comments on the scenes of interest and accounts of the fighting. The first tour covers Verdun to Commercy, via Calonne trench, Eparges, Apremont Forest, Ailly Wood and St Mihiel, including a visit to the latter. The next trip goes from Commercy to Metz, via Pont a Mousson and including a visit to Pretre Wood where there was heavy fighting from Sep 1914 to May 1915 when it finally passed into French hands and remained there. It ends with a tour of Metz. The third tour runs from Metz to Verdun via Etain, the main place of interest visited on this leg which does not take in the Verdun battlefield. Good maps and battlefield photos all make this an interesting piece of WWI history.

Roadside Americans by Jack Reid

Title Roadside Americans
Author Jack Reid
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2020-02-14
Category History
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9781469655017
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Between the Great Depression and the mid-1970s, hitchhikers were a common sight for motorists, as American service members, students, and adventurers sought out the romance of the road in droves. Beats, hippies, feminists, and civil rights and antiwar activists saw "thumb tripping" as a vehicle for liberation, living out the counterculture's rejection of traditional values. Yet, by the time Ronald Reagan, a former hitchhiker himself, was in the White House, the youthful faces on the road chasing the ghost of Jack Kerouac were largely gone—along with sympathetic portrayals of the practice in state legislatures and the media. In Roadside Americans, Jack Reid traces the rise and fall of hitchhiking, offering vivid accounts of life on the road and how the act of soliciting rides from strangers, and the attitude toward hitchhikers in American society, evolved over time in synch with broader economic, political, and cultural shifts. In doing so, Reid offers insight into significant changes in the United States amid the decline of liberalism and the rise of the Reagan Era.

Title The Death and Life of the American Middle Class
Author Abraham Unger
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2018-11-12
Category Political Science
Total Pages 55
ISBN 9783030024444
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book addresses what is perhaps the most salient issue in American politics today: the decline of the middle class. It is this single issue that drove the outlier presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump to national prominence, and undergirded the electoral victory of Donald Trump. While there are other longer studies exploring in detail the structural forces, most prominently the loss of manufacturing in the US, that have caused the contraction of the middle class, none offer in shorter form practical policy solutions directly geared towards practitioners in government and the private sector. This work focuses specifically on combining both an academic analysis of the subject combined with detailed policy recommendations. These recommendations are designed to be implemented; they take into account the latest set of real world political variables such as actual current legislative and institutional agendas currently in play on the federal and local levels.

Title Why Americans Hate Welfare
Author Martin Gilens
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2009-05-13
Category Social Science
Total Pages 303
ISBN 0226293661
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Tackling one of the most volatile issues in contemporary politics, Martin Gilens's work punctures myths and misconceptions about welfare policy, public opinion, and the role of the media in both. Why Americans Hate Welfare shows that the public's views on welfare are a complex mixture of cynicism and compassion; misinformed and racially charged, they nevertheless reflect both a distrust of welfare recipients and a desire to do more to help the "deserving" poor. "With one out of five children currently living in poverty and more than 100,000 families with children now homeless, Gilens's book is must reading if you want to understand how the mainstream media have helped justify, and even produce, this state of affairs." —Susan Douglas, The Progressive "Gilens's well-written and logically developed argument deserves to be taken seriously." —Choice "A provocative analysis of American attitudes towards 'welfare.'. . . [Gilens] shows how racial stereotypes, not white self-interest or anti-statism, lie at the root of opposition to welfare programs." -Library Journal

Title Closing of the American Mind
Author Allan Bloom
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2008-06-30
Category Social Science
Total Pages 400
ISBN 1439126267
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Closing of the American Mind, a publishing phenomenon in hardcover, is now a paperback literary event. In this acclaimed number one national best-seller, one of our country's most distinguished political philosophers argues that the social/political crisis of 20th-century America is really an intellectual crisis. Allan Bloom's sweeping analysis is essential to understanding America today. It has fired the imagination of a public ripe for change.

Title A People s History of the United States
Author Howard Zinn
Publisher Aristotext
Release Date 1996
Category United States
Total Pages 675
ISBN 9203456XXXX
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this Second Edition of this radical social history of America from Columbus to the present, Howard Zinn includes substantial coverage of the Carter, Reagan and Bush years and an Afterword on the Clinton presidency. Its commitment and vigorous style mean it will be compelling reading for under-graduate and post-graduate students and scholars in American social history and American studies, as well as the general reader.

The Americans by Daniel Joseph Boorstin

Title The Americans
Author Daniel Joseph Boorstin
Publisher Random House Incorporated
Release Date 1958
Category History
Total Pages 434
ISBN UCAL:B4393752
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Governor William Bradford, an eyewitness, reported the landing of the Mayflower passengers on the American shore in mid-November 1620. Never had a Promised Land looked more unpromising. But within a century and a half -- even before the American Revolution -- this forbidding scene had become one of the more "civill" parts of the world. The large outlines of a new civilization had been drawn. How did it happen?

American Spy by Lauren Wilkinson

Title American Spy
Author Lauren Wilkinson
Publisher Random House
Release Date 2019-02-12
Category Fiction
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780812998962
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

“American Spy updates the espionage thriller with blazing originality.”—Entertainment Weekly “There has never been anything like it.”—Marlon James, GQ “So much fun . . . Like the best of John le Carré, it’s extremely tough to put down.”—NPR NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY CHICAGO TRIBUNE AND ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY The New York Times Book Review • Time • NPR • Entertainment Weekly • Esquire • BuzzFeed • Vulture • Real Simple • Good Housekeeping • The New York Public Library What if your sense of duty required you to betray the man you love? It’s 1986, the heart of the Cold War, and Marie Mitchell is an intelligence officer with the FBI. She’s brilliant, but she’s also a young black woman working in an old boys’ club. Her career has stalled out, she’s overlooked for every high-profile squad, and her days are filled with monotonous paperwork. So when she’s given the opportunity to join a shadowy task force aimed at undermining Thomas Sankara, the charismatic revolutionary president of Burkina Faso whose Communist ideology has made him a target for American intervention, she says yes. Yes, even though she secretly admires the work Sankara is doing for his country. Yes, even though she is still grieving the mysterious death of her sister, whose example led Marie to this career path in the first place. Yes, even though a furious part of her suspects she’s being offered the job because of her appearance and not her talent. In the year that follows, Marie will observe Sankara, seduce him, and ultimately have a hand in the coup that will bring him down. But doing so will change everything she believes about what it means to be a spy, a lover, a sister, and a good American. Inspired by true events—Thomas Sankara is known as “Africa’s Che Guevara”—American Spy knits together a gripping spy thriller, a heartbreaking family drama, and a passionate romance. This is a face of the Cold War you’ve never seen before, and it introduces a powerful new literary voice. NOMINATED FOR THE NAACP IMAGE AWARD • Shortlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize “Spy fiction plus allegory, and a splash of pan-Africanism. What could go wrong? As it happens, very little. Clever, bracing, darkly funny, and really, really good.”—Ta-Nehisi Coates “Inspired by real events, this espionage thriller ticks all the right boxes, delivering a sexually charged interrogation of both politics and race.”—Esquire “Echoing the stoic cynicism of Hurston and Ellison, and the verve of Conan Doyle, American Spy lays our complicities—political, racial, and sexual—bare. Packed with unforgettable characters, it’s a stunning book, timely as it is timeless.”—Paul Beatty, Man Booker Prizewinning author of The Sellout

Title Immigration and the American Ethos
Author Morris Levy
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2020-01-02
Category History
Total Pages 240
ISBN 9781108488815
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Above and beyond the influence of prejudice and ethno-nationalism, perceptions of 'civic fairness' shape how most Americans navigate immigration controversies.

The Ugly American by William J. Lederer

Title The Ugly American
Author William J. Lederer
Publisher Turtleback Books
Release Date 1999
Category Fiction
Total Pages 285
ISBN 141762373X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The ineffectual Ambassador is just one of the handicaps facing the Americans as Southeast Asia becomes increasingly involved with Communism

We Are Americans by William Perez

Title We ARE Americans
Author William Perez
Publisher Stylus Publishing, LLC
Release Date 2018-12-07
Category Education
Total Pages 200
ISBN 9781620369982
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Winner of the CEP Mildred Garcia Award for Exemplary Scholarship About 2.4 million children and young adults under 24 years of age are undocumented. Brought by their parents to the US as minors—many before they had reached their teens—they account for about one-sixth of the total undocumented population. Illegal through no fault of their own, some 65,000 undocumented students graduate from the nation's high schools each year. They cannot get a legal job, and face enormous barriers trying to enter college to better themselves—and yet America is the only country they know and, for many, English is the only language they speak. What future do they have? Why are we not capitalizing, as a nation, on this pool of talent that has so much to contribute? What should we be doing? Through the inspiring stories of 16 students—from seniors in high school to graduate students—William Perez gives voice to the estimated 2.4 million undocumented students in the United States, and draws attention to their plight. These stories reveal how—despite financial hardship, the unpredictability of living with the daily threat of deportation, restrictions of all sorts, and often in the face of discrimination by their teachers—so many are not just persisting in the American educational system, but achieving academically, and moreover often participating in service to their local communities. Perez reveals what drives these young people, and the visions they have for contributing to the country they call home. Through these stories, this book draws attention to these students’ predicament, to stimulate the debate about putting right a wrong not of their making, and to motivate more people to call for legislation, like the stalled Dream Act, that would offer undocumented students who participate in the economy and civil life a path to citizenship. Perez goes beyond this to discuss the social and policy issues of immigration reform. He dispels myths about illegal immigrants’ supposed drain on state and federal resources, providing authoritative evidence to the contrary. He cogently makes the case—on economic, social, and constitutional and moral grounds—for more flexible policies towards undocumented immigrants. If today’s immigrants, like those of past generations, are a positive force for our society, how much truer is that where undocumented students are concerned?