Download Texts Without Boundaries Sifr To Deuteronomy And Mekhilta Attributed To Rabbi Ishmael Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online Texts Without Boundaries Sifr To Deuteronomy And Mekhilta Attributed To Rabbi Ishmael full books anytime and anywhere. Click download or read online button and get unlimited access by create free account.

Title Texts Without Boundaries Sifr to Deuteronomy and Mekhilta attributed to Rabbi Ishmael
Author Jacob Neusner
Publisher University Press of Amer
Release Date 2002
Category Religion
Total Pages 290
ISBN 076182281X
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The Rabbinic compilations in the canon of Rabbinic Judaism, from the Mishnah through the Bavli, ca. 200-600 C.E., are comprised by two classifications of writing, [1] documentary and [2] non-documentary. Documentary writing conforms to a protocol paramount in, and particular to, a given text, non-documentary writing ignores the distinctive preferences of the compilation in which it appears. The former is defined for each Rabbinic document, respectively, by a unique combination of choices as to form or rhetoric, topic or problem or proposition, and logic of coherent discourse and analysis (terms explained presently). The latter type of writing simply ignores the indicative documentary traits. It thereby crosses the boundaries that separate one text from another, indeed a given canonical compilation from all others. 'Texts without boundaries' refers to writing that ignores the protocols of the document(s) in which it is preserved.

The Secret Of The Torah by Abraham ben Meïr Ibn Ezra

Title The Secret of the Torah
Author Abraham ben Meïr Ibn Ezra
Publisher Jason Aronson Incorporated
Release Date 1995
Category Religion
Total Pages 194
ISBN UOM:39015034199102
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Ibn Ezra opens the Yesod Mora with an evaluation of the various branches of knowledge, noting that man's rational soul separates human beings from the rest of the animal kingdom. He then analyzes the role of traditional learning in the development of the soul. Ibn Ezra addresses the importance of the knowledge of grammar, stating that one cannot fully understand the text of the Torah without it. He also discusses the study of the Bible and the Talmud, arguing that one cannot properly comprehend the Talmud if one does not know the sciences, for there are many passages in the Pentateuch and the Talmud that are either incomprehensible or given to misinterpretation by one who has no prior knowledge of the sciences. This translation and annotation of Ibn Ezra's Yesod Mora offers the English-reading public a chance to acquaint themselves firsthand with a classic work by one of the most outstanding Jewish scholars of medieval Jewry.

Title Encyclopedia of the Jewish Diaspora
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2009
Category Jewish diaspora
Total Pages 86
ISBN 1851098739
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Includes a thorough bibliography pointing the way to the finest print and online resources for further reading

Title The Trial and Crucifixion of Jesus
Author Anonim
Publisher Mohr Siebeck
Release Date 2015
Category Religion
Total Pages 867
ISBN 3161537866
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

"The authors of this volume set themselves one task, to trace the extra-biblical primary texts that are relevant for understanding Jesus' trial and crucifixion. With that goal in mind, the book is built on three major themes: (1) Jesus' trial / interrogation before the Sanhedrin, (2) Jesus' trial before Pontius Pilatus, and (3) crucifixion as a method of execution in antiquity. In chronologically sequential order (where possible), the authors select and arrange an overwhelming amount of extra-biblical primary texts -- 462 to be exact -- underneath these three categories (75, 46, and 341 texts respectively)."--Brian J. Wright in Religious Studies Review.

Hidden Wisdom by Gedaliahu A. Guy Stroumsa

Title Hidden Wisdom
Author Gedaliahu A. Guy Stroumsa
Publisher BRILL
Release Date 2005
Category Religion
Total Pages 211
ISBN 9789004136359
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book investigates the problem of esoteric traditions in early Christianity, their origin and their transformation in Patristic hermeneutics, in the West as well as in the East. It argues that these traditions eventually formed the basis of nascent Christian mysticism in Late Antiquity. These esoteric traditions do not reflect the influence of Greek Mystery religions, as has often been claimed, but rather seem to stem from the Jewish background of Christianity. They were adopted by various Gnostic teachings, a fact which helps explaining their eventual disappearance from Patristic literature. The eleven chapters study each a different aspect of the problem, including the questions of Gnostic and Manichaean esotericism. This book will be of interest to all students of religious history in Late Antiquity. Revised and extended paperback edition. Originally published in 1996. Please click here for details.

Title Imperialism and Jewish Society
Author Seth Schwartz
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2009-02-09
Category History
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9781400824854
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This provocative new history of Palestinian Jewish society in antiquity marks the first comprehensive effort to gauge the effects of imperial domination on this people. Probing more than eight centuries of Persian, Greek, and Roman rule, Seth Schwartz reaches some startling conclusions--foremost among them that the Christianization of the Roman Empire generated the most fundamental features of medieval and modern Jewish life. Schwartz begins by arguing that the distinctiveness of Judaism in the Persian, Hellenistic, and early Roman periods was the product of generally prevailing imperial tolerance. From around 70 C.E. to the mid-fourth century, with failed revolts and the alluring cultural norms of the High Roman Empire, Judaism all but disintegrated. However, late in the Roman Empire, the Christianized state played a decisive role in ''re-Judaizing'' the Jews. The state gradually excluded them from society while supporting their leaders and recognizing their local communities. It was thus in Late Antiquity that the synagogue-centered community became prevalent among the Jews, that there re-emerged a distinctively Jewish art and literature--laying the foundations for Judaism as we know it today. Through masterful scholarship set in rich detail, this book challenges traditional views rooted in romantic notions about Jewish fortitude. Integrating material relics and literature while setting the Jews in their eastern Mediterranean context, it addresses the complex and varied consequences of imperialism on this vast period of Jewish history more ambitiously than ever before. Imperialism in Jewish Society will be widely read and much debated.

Goy by Adi Ophir

Title Goy
Author Adi Ophir
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2018-06-28
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780198744900
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Goy: Israel's Others and the Birth of the Gentile traces the development of the term and category of the goy from the Bible to rabbinic literature. Adi Ophir and Ishay Rosen-Zvi show that the category of the goy was born much later than scholars assume; in fact not before the first century CE. They explain that the abstract concept of the gentile first appeared in Paul's Letters. However, it was only in rabbinic literature that this category became the center of a stable and long standing structure that involved God, the Halakha, history, and salvation. The authors narrate this development through chronological analyses of the various biblical and post biblical texts (including the Dead Sea scrolls, the New Testament and early patristics, the Mishnah, and rabbinic Midrash) and synchronic analyses of several discursive structures. Looking at some of the goy's instantiations in contemporary Jewish culture in Israel and the United States, the study concludes with an examination of the extraordinary resilience of the Jew/goy division and asks how would Judaism look like without the gentile as its binary contrast.

Title Sex Rewarded Sex Punished
Author Diane Kriger
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2011
Category Religion
Total Pages 398
ISBN 1934843482
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

A masterful intersection of Bible Studies, Gender Studies, and Rabbinic law, Diane Kriger explores the laws pertaining to female slaves in Jewish law. Comparing Biblical strictures with later Rabbinic interpretations as well as contemporary Greco-Roman and Babylonian codes of law, Kriger establishes a framework whereby a woman’s sexual identity also indicates her legal status. With sensitivity to the nuances in both ancient laws and ancient languages, Kriger adds greatly to our understanding of gender, slave status, and the matrilineal principle of descent in the Ancient Near East.

Title The Talmud of the Land of Israel Volume 26
Author Jacob Neusner
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 1984-08
Category Religion
Total Pages 267
ISBN 0226576868
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Edited by the acclaimed scholar Jacob Neusner, this thirty-five volume English translation of the Talmud Yerushalmi has been hailed by the Jewish Spectator as a "project...of immense benefit to students of rabbinic Judaism."

Title Tolerance and Intolerance in Early Judaism and Christianity
Author Guy G. Stroumsa
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 1998-05-28
Category Religion
Total Pages 370
ISBN 052159037X
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The essays in this book consider issues of tolerance and intolerance faced by Jews and Christians between approximately 200 BCE and 200 CE. Several chapters are concerned with many different aspects of early Jewish-Christian relationships. Five scholars, however, take a difference tack and discuss how Jews and Christians defined themselves against the pagan world. As minority groups, both Jews and Christians had to work out ways of co-existing with their Graeco-Roman neighbours. Relationships with those neighbours were often strained, but even within both Jewish and Christian circles, issues of tolerance and intolerance surfaced regularly. So it is appropriate that some other contributors should consider 'inner-Jewish' relationships, and that some should be concerned with Christian sects.

Love Between Women by Bernadette J. Brooten

Title Love Between Women
Author Bernadette J. Brooten
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2009-02-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 446
ISBN 0226075931
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Love Between Women examines female homoeroticism and the role of women in the ancient Roman world. Employing an unparalleled range of cultural sources, Brooten finds evidence of marriages between women and establishes that condemnations of female homoerotic practices were based on widespread awareness of love between women. "An extraordinary accomplishment. . . . A definitive source for all future discussion of homoeroticism and the Bible."—Mary Rose D'Angelo, Harvard Gay & Lesbian Review "[Brooten's] convincing analysis . . . not only profoundly reshapes our understanding of the past, but it should also shape the way in which that past, particularly the early Christian texts with their immense normative weight, will be used for the future."—Anne L. Clark, Journal of Lesbian Studies "Love Between Women gives contemporary debates on sexuality a carefully delineated past. It boldly insists upon a different future, one informed by history but not tyrannized by it."—Susan Ackerman, Lambda Book Report "Fascinating, provocative and lucid. . . . Brooten has made a fundamental contribution to women's and gender studies, gay and lesbian studies, and classics."—Elizabeth A. Castelli, Women's Review of Books Winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Best Lesbian Studies Book, 1997

Title At the Intersection of Texts and Material Finds
Author Stuart S. Miller
Publisher Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Release Date 2019-03-11
Category Religion
Total Pages 423
ISBN 9783647564784
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Stuart Miller examines the hermeneutical challenges posed by the material and literary evidence pertaining to ritual purity practices in Graeco-Roman Palestine and, especially, the Galilee. He contends that “stepped pools,” which we now know were in use well beyond the Destruction of the Temple, and, as indicated by the large collection on the western acropolis of Sepphoris and elsewhere, into the Middle and Late Roman/Byzantine eras,must be understood in light of biblical and popular perspectives on ritual purity. The interpretation of the finds is too frequently forced to conform to rabbinic prescriptions, which oftentimes were the result of the sages’ unique and creative, nominalist approach to ritual purity. Special attention is given to the role ritual purity continued to play in the lives of ordinary Jews despite (or because of) the loss of the Temple. Miller argues against the prevailing tendency to type material finds—and Jewish society––according to known groups (pre-70 C.E.: Pharisaic, Sadducaic, Essenic; post 70 C.E.: rabbinic, priestly, etc.). He further counters the perception that ritual purity practices were largely the interest of priests and argues against the recent suggestion that the kohanim resurfaced as an influential group in Late Antiquity. Building upon his earlier work on “sages and commoners,” Miller claims that the rabbis emerged out of a context in which a biblically derived “complex common Judaism” thrived. Stepped pools, stone vessels, and other material finds are realia belonging to this “complex common Judaism.” A careful reading of the rabbis indicates that they were acutely aware of the extent to which ritual purity rites pertaining to home and family life had “spread,” which undoubtedly contributed to their intense interest in regulating them.

A Remembrance Of His Wonders by David I. Shyovitz

Title A Remembrance of His Wonders
Author David I. Shyovitz
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2017-05-16
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780812249118
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In A Remembrance of His Wonders, David I. Shyovitz uncovers the sophisticated ways in which medieval Ashkenazic Jews engaged with the workings and meaning of the natural world, and traces the porous boundaries between medieval science and mysticism, nature and the supernatural, and ultimately, Christians and Jews.

Execution And Invention by Beth A. Berkowitz

Title Execution and Invention
Author Beth A. Berkowitz
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2006-03-23
Category Religion
Total Pages 362
ISBN 0198039840
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The death penalty in classical Judaism has been a highly politicized subject in modern scholarship. Enlightenment attacks on the Talmud's legitimacy led scholars to use the Talmud's criminal law as evidence for its elevated morals. But even more pressing was the need to prove Jews' innocence of the charge of killing Christ. The reconstruction of a just Jewish death penalty was a defense against the accusation that a corrupt Jewish court was responsible for the death of Christ. In Execution and Invention, Beth A. Berkowitz tells the story of modern scholarship on the ancient rabbinic death penalty and offers a fresh perspective using the approaches of ritual studies, cultural criticism, and talmudic source criticism. Against the scholarly consensus, Berkowitz argues that the early Rabbis used the rabbinic laws of the death penalty to establish their power in the wake of the destruction of the Temple. Following recent currents in historiography, Berkowitz sees the Rabbis as an embattled, almost invisible sect within second-century Judaism. The function of their death penalty laws, Berkowitz contends, was to create a complex ritual of execution under rabbinic control, thus bolstering rabbinic claims to authority in the context of Roman political and cultural domination. Understanding rabbinic literature to be in dialogue with the Bible, with the variety of ancient Jews, and with Roman imperialism, Berkowitz shows how the Rabbis tried to create an appealing alternative to the Roman, paganized culture of Palestine's Jews. In their death penalty, the Rabbis substituted Rome's power with their own. Early Christians, on the other hand, used death penalty discourse to critique judicial power. But Berkowitz argues that the Christian critique of execution produced new claims to authority as much as the rabbinic embrace. By comparing rabbinic conversations about the death penalty with Christian ones, Berkowitz reveals death penalty discourse as a significant means of creating authority in second-century western religious cultures. Advancing the death penalty discourse as a discourse of power, Berkowitz sheds light on the central relationship between religious and political authority and the severest form of punishment.

Inventing Superstition by Dale B. Martin

Title Inventing Superstition
Author Dale B. Martin
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2004
Category Religion
Total Pages 307
ISBN 0674015347
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The Roman author Pliny the Younger characterizes Christianity as "contagious superstition"; two centuries later the Christian writer Eusebius vigorously denounces Greek and Roman religions as vain and impotent "superstitions." The term of abuse is the same, yet the two writers suggest entirely different things by "superstition." Dale Martin provides the first detailed genealogy of the idea of superstition, its history over eight centuries, from classical Greece to the Christianized Roman Empire of the fourth century C.E. With illuminating reference to the writings of philosophers, historians, and medical teachers he demonstrates that the concept of superstition was invented by Greek intellectuals to condemn popular religious practices and beliefs, especially the belief that gods or other superhuman beings would harm people or cause disease. Tracing the social, political, and cultural influences that informed classical thinking about piety and superstition, nature and the divine, Inventing Superstition exposes the manipulation of the label of superstition in arguments between Greek and Roman intellectuals on the one hand and Christians on the other, and the purposeful alteration of the idea by Neoplatonic philosophers and Christian apologists in late antiquity. Inventing Superstition weaves a powerfully coherent argument that will transform our understanding of religion in Greek and Roman culture and the wider ancient Mediterranean world.

Title Ancient Magic and Ritual Power
Author Paul Mirecki
Publisher BRILL
Release Date 1995-10-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 496
ISBN 9789004283817
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This volume contains a series of provocative essays, written by leading scholars who study the ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern worlds, on magic and ritual power. The essays address how ancient magic might be defined and how it came into expression in a wide variety of cultural contexts. This publication has also been published in paperback, please click here for details.

Title Practicing Piety in Medieval Ashkenaz
Author Elisheva Baumgarten
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2014-10-10
Category History
Total Pages 344
ISBN 9780812246407
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In the urban communities of medieval Germany and northern France, the beliefs, observances, and practices of Jews allowed them to create and define their communities on their own terms as well as in relation to the surrounding Christian society. Although medieval Jewish texts were written by a learned elite, the laity also observed many religious rituals as part of their everyday life. In Practicing Piety in Medieval Ashkenaz, Elisheva Baumgarten asks how Jews, especially those who were not learned, expressed their belonging to a minority community and how their convictions and deeds were made apparent to both their Jewish peers and the Christian majority. Practicing Piety in Medieval Ashkenaz provides a social history of religious practice in context, particularly with regard to the ways Jews and Christians, separately and jointly, treated their male and female members. Medieval Jews often shared practices and beliefs with their Christian neighbors, and numerous notions and norms were appropriated by one community from the other. By depicting a dynamic interfaith landscape and a diverse representation of believers, Baumgarten offers a fresh assessment of Jewish practice and the shared elements that composed the piety of Jews in relation to their Christian neighbors.

Making Christians by Denise Kimber Buell

Title Making Christians
Author Denise Kimber Buell
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2020-11-10
Category Religion
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9780691221526
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

How did second-century Christians vie with each other in seeking to produce an authoritative discourse of Christian identity? In this innovative book, Denise Buell argues that many early Christians deployed the metaphors of procreation and kinship in the struggle over claims to represent the truth of Christian interpretation, practice, and doctrine. In particular, she examines the intriguing works of the influential theologian Clement of Alexandria (ca. 150-210 c.e.), for whom cultural assumptions about procreation and kinship played an important role in defining which Christians have the proper authority to teach, and which kinds of knowledge are authentic. Buell argues that metaphors of procreation and kinship can serve to make power differentials appear natural. She shows that early Christian authors recognized this and often turned to such metaphors to mark their own positions as legitimate and marginalize others as false. Attention to the functions of this language offers a way out of the trap of reconstructing the development of early Christianity along the axes of "heresy" and "orthodoxy," while not denying that early Christians employed this binary. Ultimately, Buell argues, strategic use of kinship language encouraged conformity over diversity and had a long lasting effect both on Christian thought and on the historiography of early Christianity. Aperceptive and closely argued contribution to early Christian studies, Making Christians also branches out to the areas of kinship studies and the social construction of gender.

Why This New Race by Denise Kimber Buell

Title Why This New Race
Author Denise Kimber Buell
Publisher Columbia University Press
Release Date 2008-08
Category Religion
Total Pages 257
ISBN 9780231133357
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Denise Kimber Buell radically rethinks the origins of Christian identity, arguing that race and ethnicity played a central role in early Christian theology. Focusing on texts written before the legalization of Christianity in 313 C.E., including Greek apologetic treatises, martyr narratives, and works by Clement of Alexandria, Origen, Justin Martyr, and Tertullian, Buell shows how philosophers and theologians defined Christians as a distinct group within the Roman world, characterizing Christianness as something both fixed in its essence and fluid in its acquisition through conversion. Buell demonstrates how this view allowed Christians to establish boundaries around the meaning of Christianness and to develop the kind of universalizing claims aimed at uniting all members of the faith. Her arguments challenge generations of scholars who have refused to acknowledge ethnic reasoning in early Christian discourses. They also provide crucial insight into the historical legacy of Christian anti-Semitism and contemporary issues of race.

Idolatry by Moshe Halbertal

Title Idolatry
Author Moshe Halbertal
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 1998-08-19
Category Religion
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780674264199
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

“You shall have no other gods besides Me.” This injunction, handed down through Moses three thousand years ago, marks one of the most decisive shifts in Western culture: away from polytheism toward monotheism. Despite the momentous implications of such a turn, the role of idolatry in giving it direction and impetus is little understood. This book examines the meaning and nature of idolatry—and, in doing so, reveals much about the monotheistic tradition that defines itself against this sin. The authors consider Christianity and Islam, but focus primarily on Judaism. They explore competing claims about the concept of idolatry that emerges in the Hebrew Bible as a “whoring after false gods.” Does such a description, grounded in an analogy of sexual relations, presuppose the actual existence of other gods with whom someone might sin? Or are false gods the product of “men’s hands,” simply a matter of misguided belief? The authors show how this debate, over idolatry as practice or error, has taken shape and has in turn shaped the course of Western thought—from the differentiation between Jewish and Christian conceptions of God to the distinctions between true and false belief that inform the tradition of religious enlightenment. Ranging with authority from the Talmud to Maimonides, from Marx to Nietzsche and on to G.E. Moore, this brilliant account of a subject central to our culture also has much to say about metaphor, myth, and the application of philosophical analysis to religious concepts and sensibilities. Its insights into pluralism and intolerance, into the logic and illogic of the arguments religions aim at each other, make Idolatry especially timely and valuable in these days of dark and implacable religious difference.