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Wake Me When I M Gone by Odafe Atogun

Title Wake Me When I m Gone
Author Odafe Atogun
Publisher Canongate Books
Release Date 2017-08-03
Category Fiction
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9781782118435
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Everyone says that Ese is the most beautiful woman in the region, but a fool. A young widow, she lives in a village, where the crops grow tall and the people are ruled over by a Chief on a white horse. She married for love, but now her husband is dead, leaving her with nothing but a market stall and a young son to feed. When the Chief knocks on Ese's door demanding that she marry again, as the laws of the land dictate she must, Ese is a fool once more. There is a high price for breaking the law, and an even greater cost for breaking the heart of a Chief. Ese will face the wrath of gods and men in the fight to preserve her heart, to keep her son and to right centuries of wrongs. She will change the lives of many on the road to freedom, and she will face the greatest pain a mother ever can. Wake Me When I'm Gone is a story of curses broken and lives remade, of great tragedy and incredible rebirth. In this, his second novel, Nigerian writer Odafe Atogun unfolds a world rich with tradition and folklore, a world filled with incredible people of remarkable strength, a world that is changing fast.

Playing Dead by Elizabeth Greenwood

Title Playing Dead
Author Elizabeth Greenwood
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2017-08-15
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781476739342
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Is it still possible to fake your own death in the twenty-first century? With six figures of student loan debt, Elizabeth Greenwood was tempted to find out. So off she sets on a darkly comic foray into the world of death fraud, where for $30,000 a consultant can make you disappear--but your suspicious insurance company might hire a private detective to dig up your coffin...only to find it filled with rocks. Greenwood tracks down a British man who staged a kayaking accident and then returned to live in his own house while all his neighbors thought he was dead. She takes a call from Michael Jackson (no, he's not dead--or so her new acquaintances would have her believe), stalks message boards for people contemplating pseudocide, and gathers intel on black market morgues in the Philippines, where she may or may not obtain some fraudulent goodies of her own. Along the way, she learns that love is a much less common motive than money, and that making your death look like a drowning virtually guarantees that you'll be caught. (Disappearing while hiking, however, is a way great to go.) Playing Dead is a charmingly bizarre investigation in the vein of Jon Ronson and Mary Roach into our all-too-human desire to escape from the lives we lead, and the men and women desperate enough to give up their lives--and their families--to start again. "Delivers all the lo-fi spy shenanigans and caught-red-handed schadenfreude you're hoping for." --NPR "A lively romp." --The Boston Globe "Grim fun." --The New York Times "Brilliant topic, absorbing book." --The Seattle Times "The most literally escapist summer read you could hope for." --The Paris Review

Nobody S Children by Elizabeth Bartholet

Title Nobody s Children
Author Elizabeth Bartholet
Publisher Beacon Press
Release Date 1999
Category Family & Relationships
Total Pages 304
ISBN 0807023191
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Argues that the current system of adoption in the United States is not in the best interest of the children

Title A Floating Chinaman
Author Hua Hsu
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2016-06-07
Category History
Total Pages 276
ISBN 9780674967908
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"A Floating Chinaman is, in the broadest sense, a book about who gets to speak for China. The title is taken from a lost manuscript by H.T. Tsiang, an eccentric Chinese immigrant writer who self-published a series of visionary novels in the 1930s, a time when China was recast as a rich, unexplored mystery to the American public. At this time the United States "rediscovered" China, and the book traces its causes and cues in a variety of sites: the comfortable, middlebrow literature of Pearl Buck, Alice Tisdale Hobart and Lin Yutang; the journalism of Carl Crow and Henry Luce; exuberant reports from oil executives proclaiming a new era in global trade. On the margins--in Chinatowns, on college campuses, in the failed avant-gardism of Tsiang--a different conversation about the possibilities of a transpacific future was taking place. The book is about the circulation of ideas about China; but it is also a book about writers, rivalries, and the acquisition of authority. It is about the creation and refinement of those ideas, as well as the spirit of competition that underlies all critical endeavors. These were decades when China represented a new area of inquiry, and the stakes for writers to flex their expertise were at once intellectual, professional, and deeply personal. The author considers a range of texts--from best-sellers to self-published paperbacks, travel literature to corporate newsletters, FBI surveillance files to flowery letters from an Ellis Island detention center--and considers the competing notions of a transpacific future that animated the literary imagination as well as some satisfying moments of revenge."--Provided by publisher.

Deepwater Dreams by Sydney J. Van Scyoc

Title Deepwater Dreams
Author Sydney J. Van Scyoc
Publisher Avon Books
Release Date 1991
Category Fiction
Total Pages 249
ISBN 0380760037
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Assembling California by John McPhee

Title Assembling California
Author John McPhee
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release Date 2010-04-01
Category Science
Total Pages 303
ISBN 0374706026
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

At various times in a span of fifteen years, John McPhee made geological field surveys in the company of Eldridge Moores, a tectonicist at the University of California at Davis. The result of these trips is Assembling California, a cross-section in human and geologic time, from Donner Pass in the Sierra Nevada through the golden foothills of the Mother Lode and across the Great Central Valley to the wine country of the Coast Ranges, the rock of San Francisco, and the San Andreas family of faults. The two disparate time scales occasionally intersect—in the gold disruptions of the nineteenth century no less than in the earthquakes of the twentieth—and always with relevance to a newly understood geologic history in which half a dozen large and separate pieces of country are seen to have drifted in from far and near to coalesce as California. McPhee and Moores also journeyed to remote mountains of Arizona and to Cyprus and northern Greece, where rock of the deep-ocean floor has been transported into continental settings, as it has in California. Global in scope and a delight to read, Assembling California is a sweeping narrative of maps in motion, of evolving and dissolving lands.

Reading The Early Church Fathers by James Leonard Papandrea

Title Reading the Early Church Fathers
Author James Leonard Papandrea
Publisher Paulist Press
Release Date 2012
Category Religion
Total Pages 343
ISBN 9780809147519
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Reading the Early Church Fathers introduces the reader to the primary sources of Church history, with commentary that will help the reader make sense of the theological/Christological trajectory that led the Church from the New Testament era, through the apologists, to the development of the major doctrines of the Church. Papandrea's treatment of the early Church fathers is unique in that he situates his discussion against the social and cultural context of the Roman Empire and its relationship to the Church, especially with regard to the effect of the persecutions on the Church. Instead of providing actual excerpts of the works under discussion;' Reading the Early Church Fathers directs the reader to the primary sources available on the Internet, resources that will be updated regularly. The result, for all students of the early Church, is a unique and unprecedented "big picture" of early Christian literature. Book jacket.

Jazz And Palm Wine by Emmanuel Dongala

Title Jazz and Palm Wine
Author Emmanuel Dongala
Publisher Indiana University Press
Release Date 2017-04-03
Category Fiction
Total Pages 138
ISBN 9780253026750
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Jazz, aliens, and witchcraft collide in this collection of short stories by renowned author Emmanuel Dongala. The influence of Kongo culture is tangible throughout, as customary beliefs clash with party conceptions of scientific and rational thought. In the first half of Jazz and Palm Wine, the characters emerge victorious from decades of colonial exploitation in the Congo only to confront the burdensome bureaucracy, oppressive legal systems, and corrupt governments of the post-colonial era. The ruling political party attempts to impose order and scientific thinking while the people struggles to deal with drought, infertility, and impossible regulations and policies; both sides mix witchcraft, diplomacy, and violence in their efforts to survive. The second half of the book is set in the United States during the turbulent civil rights struggles of the 1960s. In the title story, African and American leaders come together to save the world from extraterrestrials by serving vast quantities of palm wine and playing American jazz. The stories in Jazz and Palm Wine prompt conversations about identity, race, and co-existence, providing contextualization and a historical dimension that is often sorely lacking. Through these collisions and clashes, Dongala suggests a pathway to racial harmony, peaceful co-existence, and individual liberty through artistic creation.

Foreign Mud by Maurice Collis

Title Foreign Mud
Author Maurice Collis
Publisher New Directions Publishing
Release Date 2002
Category History
Total Pages 318
ISBN 0811215067
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Based upon selected anecdotal stories written by British observers, this text reconstructs the events of the illegal opium trade in Canton in the 1830s and the war between Britain and China that followed. The volume is illustrated with b & w maps, prints, and photographs. Irish-born Collis (1889-1975) served for many years in the Indian Civil Service in Burma and later became a writer and critic in London. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Come West And See Stories by Maxim Loskutoff

Title Come West and See Stories
Author Maxim Loskutoff
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2018-05-08
Category Fiction
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780393635591
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An NPR Best Book of 2018 "Devastating.…Grows increasingly bizarre and haunting until it’s left an indelible mark." —Janet Maslin, New York Times In an isolated region of Idaho, Montana, and eastern Oregon, an armed occupation of a wildlife refuge escalates into civil war. Against this backdrop, Maxim Loskutoff shatters the myths of the West: a lonesome trapper falls in love with a bear; a newly married woman hatches a plot to murder a tree; and an unemployed millworker joins a militia after returning home. Written with “blade-sharp prose” (Electric Literature), the twelve stories in this debut collection expose the simmering rage and resentments of small-town America “with extraordinary eloquence and compassion” (National Book Review).

Rebel Music by Hisham Aidi

Title Rebel Music
Author Hisham Aidi
Publisher Vintage Books
Release Date 2014
Category Music
Total Pages 398
ISBN 9780307279972
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this pioneering study, Hisham Aidi takes us into the musical subcultures that have emerged among Muslim youth worldwide over the last decade. He shows how music - primarily hip-hop, but also rock, reggae, Gnawa and Andalusian - has come to express a shared Muslim consciousness in face of War on Terror policies

Dvorak In Love by Josef Škvorecký

Title Dvorak in Love
Author Josef Škvorecký
Publisher New York : W.W. Norton
Release Date 1988
Category Fiction
Total Pages 322
ISBN 0393305481
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Chronicles Anton Dvorak's sojourn in America at the turn of the century, when he was persuaded by Jeannette Thurber to leave his native Bohemia and become director of her National Conservatory of Music

Prince Of Monkeys by Nnamdi Ehirim

Title Prince of Monkeys
Author Nnamdi Ehirim
Publisher Catapult
Release Date 2019-04-02
Category Fiction
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781640091689
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A provocative debut novel by a brilliant young Nigerian writer, tackling politics, class, spirituality, and power as a group of friends come of age in Lagos Growing up in middle–class Lagos, Nigeria during the late 1980s and early 1990s, Ihechi forms a band of close friends discovering Lagos together as teenagers with differing opinions of everything from film to football, Fela Kuti to spirituality, sex to politics. They remain close–knit until tragedy unfolds during an anti–government riot. Exiled from Lagos by his concerned mother, Ihechi moves in with his uncle’s family, where he struggles to find himself outside his former circle of friends. Ihechi eventually finds success by leveraging his connection with a notorious prostitution linchpin and political heavyweight, earning favor among the ruling elite. But just as Ihechi is about to make his final ascent into the elite political class, he reunites with his childhood friends and experiences a crisis of conscience that forces him to question his world, his motives, and whom he should become. Nnamdi Ehirim's debut novel, Prince of Monkeys, is a lyrical, meditative observation of Nigerian life, religion, and politics at the end of the twentieth century.

Arab Jazz by Karim Miské

Title Arab Jazz
Author Karim Miské
Publisher MacLehose Press
Release Date 2016-04-12
Category Fiction
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781681446042
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Kosher sushi, kebab stands, a secondhand bookstore, and a bar: the 19th arrondissement in Paris has all the trappings of a cosmopolitan melting pot--a place where multiethnic citizens live, love, and worship alongside one another. But dark passions are brewing beneath the seemingly idyllic vision of peacefully coexisting ethnicities. Ahmed Taroudant is an archetypal French Arab-non-observant, unable to reconcile his conflicting identities, and troubled by the past. A crime fiction connoisseur, Ahmed is engrossed in his latest book when he finds blood dripping from his upstairs neighbor's apartment. There, Laura Vignole is found brutally murdered, with a joint of pork placed near her body, prompting the obvious conclusion that the killer had religious motives. As the neighborhood erupts into speculation and gossip, Ahmed finds himself first among many suspects. Detectives Rachel Kupferstein and Jean Hamelot attempt to untangle the complex web of events leading up to Laura's death, but truth is hard to come by, with each inhabitant--an Armenian anarchist, a Turkish kebab-shop owner, and a Hasidic Rastafarian--reluctant to reveal anything. Determined to clear his name, Ahmed joins the detectives as they investigate the connection between a disbanded hip-hop group and the fiery extremist preachers clamoring for attention in the streets. Meanwhile, an ecstasy variant called Godzwill is taking the district by storm. In his debut novel, Karim Miské demonstrates a masterful control of setting, as he moves effortlessly between the sensual streets of Paris and the synagogues of New York to reveal the truth behind a horrifying crime.

House Of Stone A Novel by Novuyo Rosa Tshuma

Title House of Stone A Novel
Author Novuyo Rosa Tshuma
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2019-01-29
Category Fiction
Total Pages 400
ISBN 9780393635430
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Pulsing with wit, seduction, and dark humor, House of Stone is a masterful debut that explores the creative—and often destructive—act of history-making. In the chronic turmoil of modern Zimbabwe, Abednego and Agnes Mlambo’s teenage son, Bukhosi, has gone missing, and the Mlambos fear the worst. Their enigmatic lodger, Zamani, seems to be their last, best hope for finding him. Since Bukhosi’s disappearance, Zamani has been preternaturally helpful: hanging missing posters in downtown Bulawayo, handing out fliers to passersby, and joining in family prayer vigils with the flamboyant Reverend Pastor from Agnes’s Blessed Anointings church. It’s almost like Zamani is part of the family… But almost isn’t nearly enough for Zamani. He ingratiates himself with Agnes and feeds alcoholic Abednego’s addiction, desperate to extract their life stories and steep himself in borrowed family history, as keenly aware as any colonialist or power-mad despot that the one who controls the narrative inherits the future. As Abednego wrestles with the ghosts of his past and Agnes seeks solace in a deep-rooted love, their histories converge and each must confront the past to find their place in a new Zimbabwe. Pulsing with wit, seduction, and dark humor, House of Stone is a sweeping epic that spans the fall of Rhodesia through Zimbabwe’s turbulent beginnings, exploring the persistence of the oppressed in a young nation seeking an identity, but built on forgetting.

Title Beyond the Rice Fields
Author Naivo
Publisher Restless Books
Release Date 2017-10-31
Category Fiction
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9781632061324
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The first novel from Madagascar ever to be translated into English, Naivo’s magisterial Beyond the Rice Fields delves into the upheavals of the nation’s precolonial past through the twin narratives of a slave and his master’s daughter. Fara and her father’s slave, Tsito, have shared a tender intimacy since her father bought the young boy who’d been ripped away from his family after their forest village was destroyed. Now in Sahasoa, amongst the cattle and rice fields, everything is new for Tsito, and Fara at last has a companion to play with. But as Tsito looks forward toward the bright promise of freedom and Fara, backward to a twisted, long-denied family history, a rift opens that a rapidly shifting political and social terrain can only widen. As love and innocence fall away, their world becomes defined by what tyranny and superstition both thrive upon: fear. With captivating lyricism and undeniable urgency, Naivo crafts an unsentimental interrogation of the brutal history of nineteenth-century Madagascar as a land newly exposed to the forces of Christianity and modernity, and preparing for a violent reaction against them. Beyond the Rice Fields is a tour de force about the global history of human bondage and the competing narratives that keep us from recognizing ourselves and each other, our pasts and our destinies.

An Elegy For Easterly by Petina Gappah

Title An Elegy for Easterly
Author Petina Gappah
Publisher Faber & Faber
Release Date 2009-10-29
Category Fiction
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9780571254583
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A woman in a township in Zimbabwe is surrounded by throngs of dusty children but longs for a baby of her own; an old man finds that his job making coffins at No Matter Funeral Parlour brings unexpected riches; a politician's widow quietly stands by at her husband's funeral watching his colleagues bury an empty coffin. Petina Gappah's characters may have ordinary hopes and dreams, but they are living in a world where a loaf of bread costs half a million dollars; a country expected to have only four presidents in a hundred years; and a place where people know exactly what will be printed in the one and only daily newspaper because the news is always, always good. In her spirited debut collection, Zimbabwean author Petina Gappah brings us the resilience and inventiveness of the people who struggle to live under Robert Mugabe's regime. Despite their circumstances, the characters in An Elegy for Easterly are more than victims; they are all too human, with as much capacity to inflict pain as they have to endure it. They struggle with larger issues common to all people everywhere: failed promises, unfulfilled dreams and the yearning for something to anchor them to life.

Braided Skin by Chelene Knight

Title Braided Skin
Author Chelene Knight
Publisher Mother Tongue Pub
Release Date 2015
Category Poetry
Total Pages 96
ISBN 1896949509
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Braided Skinis the vibrant telling of experiences of mixed ethnicity, urban childhood, poverty and youthful dreams through various voices. Knight writes a confident rhythm of poetry, prose and erasure by using the recurring image of braiding–a different metaphor than “mixing,” our default when speaking the language of race. In the title poem “Braided Skin,” this terminology shifts, to entwining and crossing, holding together but always displaying the promise or threat of unravelling. This is just as all tellings of family, history and relationships must be–“Skin that carries stories of missing middles.” When speaking about race, Knight raises the question, then drops it, and the image becomes other objects, then abstraction, and memory–finally becoming something “she breathes in” actively.

Savage Peace by Ann Hagedorn

Title Savage Peace
Author Ann Hagedorn
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2007-04-10
Category History
Total Pages 576
ISBN 1416539719
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Written with the sweep of an epic novel and grounded in extensive research into contemporary documents, Savage Peace is a striking portrait of American democracy under stress. It is the surprising story of America in the year 1919. In the aftermath of an unprecedented worldwide war and a flu pandemic, Americans began the year full of hope, expecting to reap the benefits of peace. But instead, the fear of terrorism filled their days. Bolshevism was the new menace, and the federal government, utilizing a vast network of domestic spies, began to watch anyone deemed suspicious. A young lawyer named J. Edgar Hoover headed a brand-new intelligence division of the Bureau of Investigation (later to become the FBI). Bombs exploded on the doorstep of the attorney general's home in Washington, D.C., and thirty-six parcels containing bombs were discovered at post offices across the country. Poet and journalist Carl Sandburg, recently returned from abroad with a trunk full of Bolshevik literature, was detained in New York, his trunk seized. A twenty-one-year-old Russian girl living in New York was sentenced to fifteen years in prison for protesting U.S. intervention in Arctic Russia, where thousands of American soldiers remained after the Armistice, ostensibly to guard supplies but in reality to join a British force meant to be a warning to the new Bolshevik government. In 1919, wartime legislation intended to curb criticism of the government was extended and even strengthened. Labor strife was a daily occurrence. And decorated African-American soldiers, returning home to claim the democracy for which they had risked their lives, were badly disappointed. Lynchings continued, race riots would erupt in twenty-six cities before the year ended, and secret agents from the government's "Negro Subversion" unit routinely shadowed outspoken African-Americans. Adding a vivid human drama to the greater historical narrative, Savage Peace brings 1919 alive through the people who played a major role in making the year so remarkable. Among them are William Monroe Trotter, who tried to put democracy for African-Americans on the agenda at the Paris peace talks; Supreme Court associate justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr., who struggled to find a balance between free speech and legitimate government restrictions for reasons of national security, producing a memorable decision for the future of free speech in America; and journalist Ray Stannard Baker, confidant of President Woodrow Wilson, who watched carefully as Wilson's idealism crumbled and wrote the best accounts we have of the president's frustration and disappointment. Weaving together the stories of a panoramic cast of characters, from Albert Einstein to Helen Keller, Ann Hagedorn brilliantly illuminates America at a pivotal moment.

The Bukowski Purdy Letters by Charles Bukowski

Title The Bukowski Purdy Letters
Author Charles Bukowski
Publisher Sutton West, Ont. : Pager Press
Release Date 1983
Category Poetry
Total Pages 117
ISBN UCSC:32106011452973
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary: