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Sensory Worlds In Early America by Peter Charles Hoffer

Title Sensory Worlds in Early America
Author Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2005-12-12
Category History
Total Pages 344
ISBN 080188392X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Over the past half-century, historians have greatly enriched our understanding of America's past, broadening their fields of inquiry from such traditional topics as politics and war to include the agency of class, race, ethnicity, and gender and to focus on the lives of ordinary men and women. We now know that homes and workplaces form a part of our history as important as battlefields and the corridors of power. Only recently, however, have historians begun to examine the fundamentals of lived experience and how people perceive the world through the five senses. In this ambitious work, Peter Charles Hoffer presents a "sensory history" of early North America, offering a bold new understanding of the role that sight, sound, smell, taste, and touch played in shaping the lives of Europeans, Indians, and Africans in the New World. Reconstructing the most ephemeral aspects of America's colonial past—the choking stench of black powder, the cacophony of unfamiliar languages, the taste of fresh water and new foods, the first sight of strange peoples and foreign landscapes, the rough texture of homespun, the clumsy weight of a hoe—Hoffer explores the impact of sensuous experiences on human thought and action. He traces the effect sensation and perception had on the cause and course of events conventionally attributed to deeper cultural and material circumstances. Hoffer revisits select key events, encounters, and writings from America's colonial past to uncover the sensory elements in each and decipher the ways in which sensual data were mediated by prevailing and often conflicting cultural norms. Among the episodes he reexamines are the first meetings of Europeans and Native Americans; belief in and encounters with the supernatural; the experience of slavery and slave revolts; the physical and emotional fervor of the Great Awakening; and the feelings that prompted the Revolution. Imaginatively conceived, deeply informed, and elegantly written, Sensory Worlds of Early America convincingly establishes sensory experience as a legitimate object of historical inquiry and vividly brings America's colonial era to life. -- Richard Godbeer, author of Sexual Revolution in Early America

Colonial Mediascapes by Matt Cohen

Title Colonial Mediascapes
Author Matt Cohen
Publisher U of Nebraska Press
Release Date 2014-04
Category History
Total Pages 438
ISBN 9780803232396
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In colonial North and South America, print was only one way of communicating. Information in various forms flowed across the boundaries between indigenous groups and early imperial settlements. Natives and newcomers made speeches, exchanged gifts, invented gestures, and inscribed their intentions on paper, bark, skins, and many other kinds of surfaces. No one method of conveying meaning was privileged, and written texts often relied on nonwritten modes of communication. Colonial Mediascapes examines how textual and nontextual literatures interacted in colonial North and South America. Extending the textual foundations of early American literary history, the editors bring a wide range of media to the attention of scholars and show how struggles over modes of communication intersected with conflicts over religion, politics, race, and gender. This collection of essays by major historians, anthropologists, and literary scholars demonstrates that the European settlement of the Americas and European interaction with Native peoples were shaped just as much by communication challenges as by traditional concerns such as religion, economics, and resources.

Empire Of The Senses by Daniela Hacke

Title Empire of the Senses
Author Daniela Hacke
Publisher BRILL
Release Date 2017-10-30
Category History
Total Pages 344
ISBN 9789004340640
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Empire of the Senses introduces new approaches to the history of European imperialism in the Americas by questioning the role that the five senses played in framing the cultural encounters, colonial knowledge, and political relationships that built New World empires.

The Brave New World by Peter Charles Hoffer

Title The Brave New World
Author Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2006
Category History
Total Pages 533
ISBN 0801884837
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Brave New World covers the span of early American history, from 30,000 years before Europeans ever landed on North American shores to creation of the new nation. With its exploration of the places and peoples of early America, this comprehensive, lively narrative brings together the most recent scholarship on the colonial and revolutionary eras, Native Americans, slavery, politics, war, and the daily lives of ordinary people. The revised, enlarged edition includes a new chapter carrying the story through the American Revolution, the War for Independence, and the creation of the Confederation. Additional material on the frontier, the Southwest and the Caribbean, the slave trade, religion, science and technology, and ecology broadens the text, and maps drawn especially for this edition will enable readers to follow the story more closely. The bibliographical essay, one of the most admired features of the first edition, has been expanded and brought up to date. Peter Charles Hoffer combines the Atlantic Rim scholarship with a Continental perspective, illuminating early America from all angles—from its first settlers to the Spanish Century, from African slavery to the Salem witchcraft cases, from prayer and drinking practices to the development of complex economies, from the colonies' fight for freedom to an infant nation's struggle for political and economic legitimacy. Wide-ranging in scope, inclusive in content, the revised edition of The Brave New World continues to provide professors, students, and historians with an engaging and accessible history of early North America.

Title The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America
Author Greta LaFleur
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press
Release Date 2020-08-04
Category History
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781421438849
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Ultimately, The Natural History of Sexuality in Early America not only rewrites all dominant scholarly narratives of eighteenth-century sexual behavior but poses a major intervention into queer theoretical understandings of the relationship between sex and the subject.

Law And People In Colonial America by Peter Charles Hoffer

Title Law and People in Colonial America
Author Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press
Release Date 2019-11-05
Category History
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9781421434599
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

It makes for essential reading.

John Adams S Republic by Richard Alan Ryerson

Title John Adams s Republic
Author Richard Alan Ryerson
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2016-09-15
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 555
ISBN 9781421419220
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

VIII. Redefining the Republican Tradition, 1784-1787 -- IX. John Adams's Republic in Republican America, 1787-1800 -- X.A Retrospective Retirement, 1801-1826 -- Conclusion: Memory and Desire in America's Republican Revolution -- Notes -- An Essay on Sources -- A Chronology of John Adams's Political Study and Writings -- Index -- A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Z

How Early America Sounded by Richard Cullen Rath

Title How Early America Sounded
Author Richard Cullen Rath
Publisher Cornell University Press
Release Date 2005
Category History
Total Pages 227
ISBN 0801472725
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Offers literary and anthropological evidence that the past placed greater importance on the aural than the visual, focusing on the significance of non-verbal noises in colonial North America from 1607 to 1770. Reprint.

Law And People In Colonial America by Peter Charles Hoffer

Title Law and People in Colonial America
Author Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2019-11-05
Category History
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9781421434605
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

How did American colonists transform British law into their own? What were the colonies' first legal institutions, and who served in them? And why did the early Americans develop a passion for litigation that continues to this day? In Law and People in Colonial America, Peter Charles Hoffer tells the story of early American law from its beginnings on the British mainland to its maturation during the crisis of the American Revolution. For the men and women of colonial America, Hoffer explains, law was a pervasive influence in everyday life. Because it was their law, the colonists continually adapted it to fit changing circumstances. They also developed a sense of legalism that influenced virtually all social, economic, and political relationships. This sense of intimacy with the law, Hoffer argues, assumed a transforming power in times of crisis. In the midst of a war for independence, American revolutionaries used their intimacy with the law to explain how their rebellion could be lawful, while legislators wrote republican constitutions that would endure for centuries. Today the role of law in American life is more pervasive than ever. And because our system of law involves a continuing dialogue between past and present, interpreting the meaning of precedent and of past legislation, the study of legal history is a vital part of every citizen's basic education. Taking advantage of rich new scholarship that goes beyond traditional approaches to view slavery as a fundamental cultural and social institution as well as an economic one, this second edition includes an extensive, entirely new chapter on colonial and revolutionary-era slave law. Law and People in Colonial America is a lively introduction to early American law. It makes for essential reading.

Title The Routledge Handbook of Sensory Archaeology
Author Robin Skeates
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2019-11-19
Category Social Science
Total Pages 592
ISBN 9781317197461
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Edited by two pioneers in the field of sensory archaeology, this Handbook comprises a key point of reference for the ever-expanding field of sensory archaeology: one that surpasses previous books in this field, both in scope and critical intent. This Handbook provides an extensive set of specially commissioned chapters, each of which summarizes and critically reflects on progress made in this dynamic field during the early years of the twenty-first century. The authors identify and discuss the key current concepts and debates of sensory archaeology, providing overviews and commentaries on its methods and its place in interdisciplinary sensual culture studies. Through a set of thematic studies, they explore diverse sensorial practices, contexts and materials, and offer a selection of archaeological case-studies from different parts of the world. In the light of this, the research methods now being brought into the service of sensory archaeology are re-examined. Of interest to scholars, students and others with an interest in archaeology around the world, this book will be invaluable to archaeologists and is also of relevance to scholars working in disciplines contributing to sensory studies: aesthetics, anthropology, architecture, art history, communication studies, history (including history of science), geography, literary and cultural studies, material culture studies, museology, philosophy, psychology, and sociology.

Removable Type by Phillip H. Round

Title Removable Type
Author Phillip H. Round
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date 2010-10-11
Category Social Science
Total Pages 296
ISBN 080789947X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1663, the Puritan missionary John Eliot, with the help of a Nipmuck convert whom the English called James Printer, produced the first Bible printed in North America. It was printed not in English but in Algonquian, making it one of the first books printed in a Native language. In this ambitious and multidisciplinary work, Phillip Round examines the relationship between Native Americans and printed books over a two-hundred-year period, uncovering the individual, communal, regional, and political contexts for Native peoples' use of the printed word. From the northeastern woodlands to the Great Plains, Round argues, alphabetic literacy and printed books mattered greatly in the emergent, transitional cultural formations of indigenous nations threatened by European imperialism. Removable Type showcases the varied ways that Native peoples produced and utilized printed texts over time, approaching them as both opportunity and threat. Surveying this rich history, Round addresses such issues as the role of white missionaries and Christian texts in the dissemination of print culture in Indian Country, the establishment of "national" publishing houses by tribes, the production and consumption of bilingual texts, the importance of copyright in establishing Native intellectual sovereignty (and the sometimes corrosive effects of reprinting thereon), and the significance of illustrations.

Title A Natural History of the Senses
Author Diane Ackerman
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2011-12-07
Category Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780307763310
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Diane Ackerman's lusciously written grand tour of the realm of the senses includes conversations with an iceberg in Antarctica and a professional nose in New York, along with dissertations on kisses and tattoos, sadistic cuisine and the music played by the planet Earth. “Delightful . . . gives the reader the richest possible feeling of the worlds the senses take in.” —The New York Times

How Race Is Made by Mark M. Smith

Title How Race Is Made
Author Mark M. Smith
Publisher ReadHowYouWant.com
Release Date 2009-09-16
Category Social Science
Total Pages 364
ISBN 9781458719072
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For at least two centuries, argues mark smith, white southerners used all of their senses - not just their eyes - to construct racial difference and dene race. His provocative analysis, extending from the colonial period to the mid-twentieth century, shows how whites of all classes used the articial binary of ''black'' and ''white'' to justify slavery and erect the political, legal, and social structure of segregation. Based on painstaking research, how race is made is a highly original, always frank, and often disturbing book. After enslaved Africans were initially brought to America, the offspring of black and white sexual relationships (consensual and forced) complicated the purely visual sense of racial typing. As mixed-race people became more and more common and as antebellum race-based slavery and then postbellum racial segregation became central to southern society, white southerners asserted that they could relyon their other senses - touch, smell, sound, and taste - to identify who was ''white'' and who was not. Sensory racial stereotypes were invented and irrational, but at every turn, smith shows, these constructions of race, immune to logic, signied difference and perpetuated inequality. Smith argues that the history of southern race relations and the construction of racial difference on which that history is built cannot be understood fully on the basis of sight alone. In order to come to terms with the south's past and present, smith says, we must explore the sensory dynamics underpinning the deeply emotional construction of race. How race is made takes a bold step toward that understanding.

The Color Of Angels by Constance Classen

Title The Color of Angels
Author Constance Classen
Publisher Psychology Press
Release Date 1998
Category Psychology
Total Pages 234
ISBN 0415180732
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This text looks at the symbolism of the senses which animated the cosmos before the modern scientific view of the world came to dominate, revealing the gender politics behind such sensory constructs as the male gaze and the female touch.

The Devil S Disciples by Peter Charles Hoffer

Title The Devil s Disciples
Author Peter Charles Hoffer
Publisher Johns Hopkins University Press
Release Date 1998-03-10
Category History
Total Pages 296
ISBN 0801852013
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The accusations, denials, and confessions of this legal story eventually resurrect the tangled internal tensions that lay at the bottom of the Salem witch hunts.

Brain Sense by Faith Hickman Brynie

Title Brain Sense
Author Faith Hickman Brynie
Publisher AMACOM
Release Date 2009-09-28
Category Science
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9780814413265
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Complex and crucially important, the senses collect the massive amount of information we need to navigate daily life, and serve as a filter between our inner selves and the larger world. But the science of how the senses work has been little understood—until now. New research is rapidly uncovering fascinating insights into how the brain processes sensory information. It’s not simply a matter of the brain controlling the senses; the senses actually stimulate brain development. For example, the brain’s sound-processing centers mature properly only when sound impulses trigger them to do so—which is why cochlear implants are best used before the age of three. Brain Sense reveals this and a wealth of findings on how the brain and senses interact, as it examines each of the five major senses: touch, smell, taste, vision, and hearing. With eloquent writing and gripping stories, the author deploys a rare gift for explaining complex scientific ideas in a way that is clear and comprehensible. She introduces the scientists at the forefront of “brain sense” studies—neurologists, brain mappers, bio­chemists, physicians, cognitive psychologists, and others—as well as real-life people who are contributing to the research and benefiting from its practical applications, such as haptic devices to assist people who have lost limbs or rehabilitative software for those who have suffered impairments to their motion vision. You’ll find new research that explains: • Why placebos work by changing the way the brain processes pain • How humans respond to pheromones in the same manner as other animals • How taste is highly influenced by expectations of taste • Why color significantly aids the ability to remember an object • How the capacity for language is already at work in newborn babies • What happens in the brain to produce sensory experiences such as déjà vu and phantom limb pain • And much more Expansive and enlightening, Brain Sense shows us that the brain is both flexible and variable, and the reality that we construct based on inputs gathered from the senses differs from person to person. It sheds a much-needed light on the elusive workings of the extraordinary human brain.

Title Asperger Syndrome and Sensory Issues
Author Brenda Smith Myles
Publisher AAPC Publishing
Release Date 2000
Category Education
Total Pages 129
ISBN 0967251486
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The author describes his life and how he has coped living with Asperger's syndrome.

The Sounds Of Slavery by Shane White

Title The Sounds of Slavery
Author Shane White
Publisher Beacon Press
Release Date 2005
Category History
Total Pages 241
ISBN 080705027X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Collects songs, speeches, and sermons that provide a revealing window into the sufferings of slaves, as well as some of the most revealing of such documents from the 1700s through the 1850s.

Title American History
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2003
Category Periodicals
Total Pages 86
ISBN STANFORD:36105113522283
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Senses Of The Empire by Eleanor Betts

Title Senses of the Empire
Author Eleanor Betts
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Release Date 2017-02-24
Category History
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9781317057284
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Roman empire afforded a kaleidoscope of sensations. Through a series of multisensory case studies centred on people, places, buildings and artefacts, and on specific aspects of human behaviour, this volume develops ground-breaking methods and approaches for sensory studies in Roman archaeology and ancient history. Authors explore questions such as: what it felt like, and symbolised, to be showered with saffron at the amphitheatre; why the shape of a dancer’s body made him immediately recognisable as a social outcast; how the dramatic gestures, loud noises and unforgettable smells of a funeral would have different meanings for members of the family and for bystanders; and why feeling the weight of a signet ring on his finger contributed to a man’s sense of identity. A multisensory approach is taken throughout, with each chapter exploring at least two of the senses of sight, hearing, smell, taste and touch. The contributors’ individual approaches vary, reflecting the possibilities and the wide application of sensory studies to the ancient world. Underlying all chapters is a conviction that taking a multisensory approach enriches our understanding of the Roman empire, but also an awareness of the methodological problems encountered when reconstructing past experiences.