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The Promised Land by Boulou Ebanda de B’béri

Title The Promised Land
Author Boulou Ebanda de B’béri
Publisher University of Toronto Press
Release Date 2014
Category History
Total Pages 234
ISBN 9781442615335
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Eschewing the often romanticized Underground Railroad narrative that portrays southern Ontario as the welcoming destination of Blacks fleeing from slavery, The Promised Land reveals the Chatham-Kent area as a crucial settlement site for an early Black presence in Canada. The contributors present the everyday lives and professional activities of individuals and families in these communities and highlight early cross-border activism to end slavery in the United States and to promote civil rights in the United States and Canada. Essays also reflect on the frequent intermingling of local Black, White, and First Nations people. Using a cultural studies framework for their collective investigations, the authors trace physical and intellectual trajectories of Blackness that have radiated from southern Ontario to other parts of Canada, the United States, the Caribbean, and Africa. The result is a collection that represents the presence and diffusion of Blackness and inventively challenges the grand narrative of history.

Pagans In The Promised Land by Steven T. Newcomb

Title Pagans in the Promised Land
Author Steven T. Newcomb
Publisher Fulcrum Publishing
Release Date 2008
Category Law
Total Pages 186
ISBN 1555916422
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An analysis of how religious bias shaped U.S. federal Indian law.

In The Promised Land by Pierre Talec

Title In the Promised Land
Author Pierre Talec
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1983
Category Bible
Total Pages 125
ISBN 0866831932
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Recounts the exploits of Jewish leaders from Joshua to King David in their conquest and settlement of the Promised Land.

My Promised Land by Ari Shavit

Title My Promised Land
Author Ari Shavit
Publisher Spiegel & Grau
Release Date 2013-11-19
Category History
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9780812984644
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW AND THE ECONOMIST Winner of the Natan Book Award, the National Jewish Book Award, and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award An authoritative and deeply personal narrative history of the State of Israel, by one of the most influential journalists writing about the Middle East today Not since Thomas L. Friedman’s groundbreaking From Beirut to Jerusalem has a book captured the essence and the beating heart of the Middle East as keenly and dynamically as My Promised Land. Facing unprecedented internal and external pressures, Israel today is at a moment of existential crisis. Ari Shavit draws on interviews, historical documents, private diaries, and letters, as well as his own family’s story, illuminating the pivotal moments of the Zionist century to tell a riveting narrative that is larger than the sum of its parts: both personal and national, both deeply human and of profound historical dimension. We meet Shavit’s great-grandfather, a British Zionist who in 1897 visited the Holy Land on a Thomas Cook tour and understood that it was the way of the future for his people; the idealist young farmer who bought land from his Arab neighbor in the 1920s to grow the Jaffa oranges that would create Palestine’s booming economy; the visionary youth group leader who, in the 1940s, transformed Masada from the neglected ruins of an extremist sect into a powerful symbol for Zionism; the Palestinian who as a young man in 1948 was driven with his family from his home during the expulsion from Lydda; the immigrant orphans of Europe’s Holocaust, who took on menial work and focused on raising their children to become the leaders of the new state; the pragmatic engineer who was instrumental in developing Israel’s nuclear program in the 1960s, in the only interview he ever gave; the zealous religious Zionists who started the settler movement in the 1970s; the dot-com entrepreneurs and young men and women behind Tel-Aviv’s booming club scene; and today’s architects of Israel’s foreign policy with Iran, whose nuclear threat looms ominously over the tiny country. As it examines the complexities and contradictions of the Israeli condition, My Promised Land asks difficult but important questions: Why did Israel come to be? How did it come to be? Can Israel survive? Culminating with an analysis of the issues and threats that Israel is currently facing, My Promised Land uses the defining events of the past to shed new light on the present. The result is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape. Praise for My Promised Land “This book will sweep you up in its narrative force and not let go of you until it is done. [Shavit’s] accomplishment is so unlikely, so total . . . that it makes you believe anything is possible, even, God help us, peace in the Middle East.”—Simon Schama, Financial Times “[A] must-read book.”—Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times “Important and powerful . . . the least tendentious book about Israel I have ever read.”—Leon Wieseltier, The New York Times Book Review “Spellbinding . . . Shavit’s prophetic voice carries lessons that all sides need to hear.”—The Economist “One of the most nuanced and challenging books written on Israel in years.”—The Wall Street Journal

Title Gone from the Promised Land
Author Anonim
Publisher Transaction Publishers
Release Date 2021
Category Social Science
Total Pages 381
ISBN 1412824737
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

If we are to learn anything of value from the murders and mass suicide at Jonestown, its history must be salvaged from popular myths, which are little more than super cial atrocity tales. In this superb cultural history, John R. Hall presents a reasoned analysis of the meaning of Jonestown: why it happened and how it is tied to our history as a nation, our ideals, our practices, and the tensions of modern culture. Hall de ates the myths of Jonestown by exploring the social character of Jim Joness Peoples Temple-how much of what transpired was unique to the group and its leader and how much can be explained by reference to wider social processes?

The Promised Land by Rawls Howard

Title The Promised Land
Author Rawls Howard
Publisher Copernicus Publishing
Release Date 2018-10-15
Category
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780578209166
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Discovering the Kingdom of God in Eastern North Carolina. A small-town boy's adventures in the Land of Milk and Honey.

Too Often Promised Land by Richard H. Curtiss

Title Too Often Promised Land
Author Richard H. Curtiss
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1980
Category Arab-Israeli conflict
Total Pages 74
ISBN UOM:39015012934025
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Competition In The Promised Land by Leah Platt Boustan

Title Competition in the Promised Land
Author Leah Platt Boustan
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2016-11-08
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 216
ISBN 9780691150871
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From 1940 to 1970, nearly four million black migrants left the American rural South to settle in the industrial cities of the North and West. Competition in the Promised Land provides a comprehensive account of the long-lasting effects of the influx of black workers on labor markets and urban space in receiving areas. Traditionally, the Great Black Migration has been lauded as a path to general black economic progress. Leah Boustan challenges this view, arguing instead that the migration produced winners and losers within the black community. Boustan shows that migrants themselves gained tremendously, more than doubling their earnings by moving North. But these new arrivals competed with existing black workers, limiting black–white wage convergence in Northern labor markets and slowing black economic growth. Furthermore, many white households responded to the black migration by relocating to the suburbs. White flight was motivated not only by neighborhood racial change but also by the desire on the part of white residents to avoid participating in the local public services and fiscal obligations of increasingly diverse cities. Employing historical census data and state-of-the-art econometric methods, Competition in the Promised Land revises our understanding of the Great Black Migration and its role in the transformation of American society.

Promised Land by Martin Fletcher

Title Promised Land
Author Martin Fletcher
Publisher Thomas Dunne Books
Release Date 2018-09-04
Category Fiction
Total Pages 400
ISBN 9781250118844
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Martin Fletcher, who headed up NBC TV’s Tel Aviv News Bureau, knows his territory and it shows on every page. Promised Land is a great sweeping epic, reminiscent of Leon Uris’ Exodus; a moving story of triumph and tragedy, new love and historic hate, expertly told by a cast of unforgettable characters. Fletcher’s writing is superb and rises to the level of importance that this story demands and deserves. Historical novels don’t get much better than Promised Land." —Nelson DeMille, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Cuban Affair Promised Land is the sweeping saga of two brothers and the woman they love, a devastating love triangle set against the tumultuous founding of Israel. The story begins when fourteen-year-old Peter is sent west to America to escape the growing horror of Nazi Germany. But his younger brother Arie and their entire family are sent east to the death camps. Only Arie survives. The brothers reunite in the nascent Jewish state, where Arie becomes a businessman and one of the richest men in Israel while Peter becomes a top Mossad agent heading some of Israel’s most vital espionage operations. One brother builds Israel, the other protects it. But they also fall in love with the same woman, Tamara, a lonely Jewish refugee from Cairo. And over the next two decades, as their new homeland faces extraordinary obstacles that could destroy it, the brothers’ intrigues and jealousies threaten to tear their new lives apart. Promised Land is at once the gripping tale of a struggling family and an epic about a struggling nation.

Title Promised Land on the Solomon
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1986
Category African American architecture
Total Pages 133
ISBN MINN:31951002941473Y
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Bag Man by Rachel Maddow

Title Bag Man
Author Rachel Maddow
Publisher Crown
Release Date 2020-12-08
Category Political Science
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780593136690
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The knockdown, drag-out, untold story of the other scandal that rocked Nixon’s White House, and reset the rules for crooked presidents to come—with new reporting that expands on Rachel Maddow’s Peabody Award-nominated podcast “Rachel Maddow and Michael Yarvitz expand on their riveting podcast to create a work both scholarly and disturbing in its parallels to current events.”—Preet Bharara, New York Times bestselling author of Doing Justice and host of the podcast Stay Tuned with Preet Is it possible for a sitting vice president to direct a vast criminal enterprise within the halls of the White House? To have one of the most brazen corruption scandals in American history play out while nobody’s paying attention? And for that scandal to be all but forgotten decades later? The year was 1973, and Spiro T. Agnew, the former governor of Maryland, was Richard Nixon’s second-in-command. Long on firebrand rhetoric and short on political experience, Agnew had carried out a bribery and extortion ring in office for years, when—at the height of Watergate—three young federal prosecutors discovered his crimes and launched a mission to take him down before it was too late, before Nixon’s impending downfall elevated Agnew to the presidency. The self-described “counterpuncher” vice president did everything he could to bury their investigation: dismissing it as a “witch hunt,” riling up his partisan base, making the press the enemy, and, with a crumbling circle of loyalists, scheming to obstruct justice in order to survive. In this blockbuster account, Rachel Maddow and Michael Yarvitz detail the investigation that exposed Agnew’s crimes, the attempts at a cover-up—which involved future president George H. W. Bush—and the backroom bargain that forced Agnew’s resignation but also spared him years in federal prison. Based on the award-winning hit podcast, Bag Man expands and deepens the story of Spiro Agnew’s scandal and its lasting influence on our politics, our media, and our understanding of what it takes to confront a criminal in the White House.

Title Summary A Promised Land Barack Obama and Becoming Michelle Obama
Author Scott Campbell
Publisher Scott Campbell
Release Date 2021-01-27
Category Study Aids
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9203456XXXX
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Warning! This is a summary for two books and intended to harmonize with, not replace, Barack Obama’s compelling story, A Promised Land, and Michelle Obama’s epic story and the best selling book in 2018, Becoming. A riveting, deeply personal account of history in the making, A Promised Land relates the story of Obama’s unlikely journey starting as a young boy in Indonesia and Hawaii. His time in prep school showed more passion for his jump-shot and partying than studying. We experience his college years under the admitted influence of Marxism, and into Harvard Law and as the President of the Law Review-- which would launch his political career from substantial hype in The New York Times. Obama offers insights into the dynamics of U.S. partisan politics, and international diplomacy, up until the time he allegedly captures Osama bin Laden. In a life filled with racial tension, and a haunting self-doubt of her abilities, Michelle Obama emerged as one of the most iconic women in the last decade. Establishing herself as a powerful advocate for the female sex, improved nutrition, and exercise became priorities. We experience her childhood on the South Side of Chicago, a shy girl self-confined to her room after school to play with dolls until age 10, to her years as an executive balancing the demands of work and being a mother, to her time spent in the 132-room White House where she broke security protocol to sneak out to see the rainbow White House colors to celebrate gay marriage in all 50 states. She describes her triumphs and her disappointments, both private and public--like inappropriately placing her hand on the Queen of England. or saying that she was proud of America--for the first time. Becoming is the personal story of an unlikely rise to the White House by a woman of color that also sends up a few puzzling red flags and glosses over a few key facts.

The Promised Land by Nicholas Lemann

Title The Promised Land
Author Nicholas Lemann
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2011-08-24
Category History
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780307764874
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Promised Land Crusader State by Walter A. McDougall

Title Promised Land Crusader State
Author Walter A. McDougall
Publisher Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Release Date 1997
Category History
Total Pages 286
ISBN 0395901324
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A look at America's foreign policy over the past two hundred years posits the theory that America is struggling with two visions of itself as reflected in its foreign policy

Barren In The Promised Land by Elaine Tyler May

Title Barren in the Promised Land
Author Elaine Tyler May
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 1997
Category Social Science
Total Pages 318
ISBN 0674061829
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Chronicling astonishing shifts in public attitudes toward reproduction, May reveals the intersection between public life and the most private part of our lives--sexuality, procreation, and family.

Title The Notion of Identity in Mary Antin s The Promised Land
Author Christiane Abspacher
Publisher GRIN Verlag
Release Date 2007-11
Category
Total Pages 32
ISBN 9783638752381
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Seminar paper from the year 2006 in the subject American Studies - Literature, grade: 1,7, University of Regensburg (Anglistik und Amerikanistik, Philosophische Fakultat ), course: Hauptseminar Amerikanistik (Literaturwissenschaft), 5 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: In order to be able to grasp the dimension of the role identity plays in Mary Antin's The Promised Land, one has to take into consideration the author's biographical background, as the first part of her life differs completely from the later years. She is born in the Jewish Polotzk near Witebsk in White Russia. In 1894, the family emigrates to the United States. Mary receives solid school education and manages to have her first poem published in the Boston Herald at the age of fifteen. With the help of diligence, natural ability, curiousness and luck, Mary Antin advances from her proletarian neighbourhood to higher educated circles. Antin publishes several essays, short stories and poems, gives lectures and gets involved with the loosening of laws restricting immigration. Already at the age of twenty, Mary Antin writes her autobiography The Promised Land (formerly published under the name of "From Polotzk to Boston"), which describes her childhood in Russia, her immigration to America, the initial problems in her new homeland and her success in gaining ground. Especially the preface causes attention, as she calls her life "unusual, but by no means unique. (...) [A] concrete illustration of a multitude of statistical facts," while she is distancing herself from her former life as Maryashe Weltman in Polotzk. The high degree of self- reflexiveness and the dispartment of her own person into at least two identities predestine her book as a subject of inquiry by means of sociological investigation in the field of identity research. In order to discuss Mary Antin's notion of identity, it is required to outline the term itself. Within the last decades, this concept has become central to"

Title Manchild in the Promised Land
Author Claude Brown
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2012-01-03
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9781451626674
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the author's experiences as a first-generation African American raised in the Northern ghettos of Harlem in the mid-20th century, an upbringing marked by violence, drugs and devastating urban disadvantages.

In The Almost Promised Land by Hasia R. Diner

Title In the Almost Promised Land
Author Hasia R. Diner
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 1995-10
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 271
ISBN 0801850657
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Diner has neither idolized nor debunked the Jewish leaders who sought to help blacks achieve a better life. What she has done, and this should be a model for others writing ethnic history, is to examine the complexities that motivated one group of individuals to help another." -- Labor History

Peasants In The Promised Land by Jaroslav Petryshyn

Title Peasants in the Promised Land
Author Jaroslav Petryshyn
Publisher James Lorimer & Company
Release Date 1985
Category History
Total Pages 265
ISBN 0888629257
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For many years following Confederation, Canada remained an absurd country: with its vast West still free of agricultural settlers, John A. Macdonald's vision of a great nation bound together by a transcontinental railway and a nationalist economic policy remained an unfulfilled dream. On the other side of the Atlantic, the present-day Ukraine was vastly overpopulated with "redundant" peasants. Their increasingly precarious existence triggered emigration: more than 170 000 of them sailed for Canada. Life in the promised land was hard. Many Canadians seemed to think that the only good immigrants were British; some went so far as to suggest that the Ukrainian newcomers were less than human. But on the harsh and remote prairies, the Ukrainians triumphed over the toil and isolation of homesteading, putting down roots and prospering. Peasants in the Promised Land is the first book to focus on the formative period of Ukrainian settlement in Canada. Drawing on his exhaustive research, including Ukrainian-language archival sources, Jaroslav Petryshyn brings history to life with extracts from memoirs, letters and newspapers of the period. His text is illustrated with maps and historical photographs.

A Journey To The Promised Land by J. Mastine Nisbett

Title A Journey to the Promised Land
Author J. Mastine Nisbett
Publisher AuthorHouse
Release Date 2011-03
Category Religion
Total Pages 184
ISBN 9781452092324
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Dean Nisbett has crafted an excellent book that is carefully researched. He is a masterful storyteller, combining theology, sociology, history, scripture and church architecture into a masterpiece. Writing about the struggle of a suburban parish to build an edifice, the author cites numerous parallels between the Israelites' history and that of the parish. He recasts the Israelites' story into the contemporary, making the Bible relevant in demonstrating the ongoing work of God. Nisbett explores the struggle of African Americans to be integrated into the United States of America. He addresses the tension between West Indians and black Americans and notes the latter's significant contribution to the Episcopal Church. He recognizes the indelible contribution of the first African Americans who penetrated the white enclave of Cambria Heights. Recognition is also made of black Episcopalians for their valuable contribution to the society and for challenging the church to be honest to its Catholicity, insisting that they (black Episcopalians) be included into the "Body of Christ."The author explicates the concept of vocation, the "call" to serve God in His church. He shares his personal experience. Very inspiring! A must read for those contemplating the ordained ministry.The book integrates the Church into the life of the community. It is an excellent tool for congregational development, and could serve as a model for congregations to chronicle their history from a theological perspective. In addition, the book will be useful to those researching the history of the ordination of black Episcopalians and the birth of the black Episcopal congregation in the United States. It is a wonderful resource for those considering church construction. Finally, the author theologizes the building and provides a helpful manual for every worshiper whom the author (in" reference to 1st Peter") describes as "living stones" built upon the foundation of Jesus Christ, "The chief Corner Stone."