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Policing Citizens by P. A. J. Waddington

Title Policing Citizens
Author P. A. J. Waddington
Publisher Psychology Press
Release Date 1999
Category Social Science
Total Pages 303
ISBN 1857286936
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This comparative text serves both as an introduction to contemporary police studies and an intervention into current debates concerning police reform and practice.

Policing Non Citizens by Leanne Weber

Title Policing Non Citizens
Author Leanne Weber
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2013-09-11
Category Social Science
Total Pages 222
ISBN 9781135091712
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Criminologists are increasingly turning their attention to the many points of intersection between immigration and crime control. This book discusses the detection of unlawful non-citizens as a distinct form of policing which is impacting on a growing range of agencies and sections of society. It constitutes an important contribution not only to the literature on policing but also to the field of border control studies within criminology. Drawing on the work of Clifford Shearing, Ian Loader and P.A.J. Waddington, it offers new theoretical approaches to the study of police powers and practice.

Policing Citizens by P.A.J. Waddington

Title Policing Citizens
Author P.A.J. Waddington
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2002-11-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781135361501
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This analysis of policing throughout the modern world demonstrates how many of the contentious issues surrounding the police in recent years - from paramilitarism to community policing - have their origins in the fundamentals of the police role. The author argues that this results from a fundamental tension within this role. In liberal democratic societies, police are custodians of the state's monopoly of legitimate force, yet they also wield authority over citizens who have their own set of rights.

Policing Citizens by Guy Ben-Porat

Title Policing Citizens
Author Guy Ben-Porat
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2019-07-31
Category History
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9781108417259
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

What does police violence against minorities, or violent clashes between minorities and the police tell us about citizenship and its internal hierarchies? Indicative of deep-seated tensions and negative perceptions; incidents such as these suggest how minorities are vulnerable, suffer from or are subject to police abuse and neglect in Israel. Marked by skin colour, negatively stigmatized or rendered security threats, their encounters with police provide a daily reminder of their defunct citizenship. Taking as case studies the experiences and perceptions of four minority groups within Israel including Palestinian/Arab citizens, ultra-Orthodox Jews and Ethiopian and Russian immigrants, Ben-Porat and Yuval are able to explore different paths of citizenship and the stratification of the citizenship regime through relations with and perceptions of the police in Israel. Touching on issues such as racial profiling, police brutality and neighbourhood neglect, their study questions the notions of citizenship and belonging, shedding light on minority relationships with the state and its institutions.

Policing Non Citizens by Leanne Weber

Title Policing Non citizens
Author Leanne Weber
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2013
Category Social Science
Total Pages 214
ISBN 0415811295
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Policing non-citizens explores the intersection between policing, border control and citizenship under the transformative conditions of globalisation. This book concerntratesd on the policing of the internal border and the networked nature of that border policing effort. It draws on empirical research conducted in the Australian state of New South Wales which was designed to identify the means by which individuals designated as 'unlawful non-citizens' are detected by networks of public and private agencies.

Pulled Over by Charles R. Epp

Title Pulled Over
Author Charles R. Epp
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2014-04-04
Category Law
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780226114040
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In sheer numbers, no form of government control comes close to the police stop. Each year, twelve percent of drivers in the United States are stopped by the police, and the figure is almost double among racial minorities. Police stops are among the most recognizable and frequently criticized incidences of racial profiling, but, while numerous studies have shown that minorities are pulled over at higher rates, none have examined how police stops have come to be both encouraged and institutionalized. Pulled Over deftly traces the strange history of the investigatory police stop, from its discredited beginning as “aggressive patrolling” to its current status as accepted institutional practice. Drawing on the richest study of police stops to date, the authors show that who is stopped and how they are treated convey powerful messages about citizenship and racial disparity in the United States. For African Americans, for instance, the experience of investigatory stops erodes the perceived legitimacy of police stops and of the police generally, leading to decreased trust in the police and less willingness to solicit police assistance or to self-censor in terms of clothing or where they drive. This holds true even when police are courteous and respectful throughout the encounters and follow seemingly colorblind institutional protocols. With a growing push in recent years to use local police in immigration efforts, Hispanics stand poised to share African Americans’ long experience of investigative stops. In a country that celebrates democracy and racial equality, investigatory stops have a profound and deleterious effect on African American and other minority communities that merits serious reconsideration. Pulled Over offers practical recommendations on how reforms can protect the rights of citizens and still effectively combat crime.

Policing Citizens by Peter A. J Waddington

Title Policing Citizens
Author Peter A. J Waddington
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1998
Category Citizenship
Total Pages 86
ISBN OCLC:1035794536
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Policing Legitimacy by Justin R. Ellis

Title Policing Legitimacy
Author Justin R. Ellis
Publisher Springer Nature
Release Date 2021-07-31
Category Social Science
Total Pages 169
ISBN 9783030735197
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book critically analyses the impact of digital media technologies on police scandal. Using an in-depth analysis of a viral bystander video of police excessive force filmed at the 2013 Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras Parade and uploaded to YouTube, the book addresses the ways social media video sousveillance can shape operational and institutional police responses to police misconduct. The volume features new research on the immediate and longer-term impacts of social media-generated police scandal on police legitimacy and accountability and responds to inherent questions of procedural justice. It interrogates the technological, political and legal frameworks that govern the relationships between the police and LGBTQI communities in Australia and beyond through the ‘social media test’ – the police narratives created and contested through social media, mainstream media, and police media. In doing so, it considers the role of sexual citizenship discourse as a political, economic and social organizing principle. A comprehensive and interdisciplinary understanding of ‘digital’ and ‘queer’ criminology, this is an essential read for those working at the intersection of criminology and the digital society, queer criminology, and critical criminology.

Policing Citizenship by Patrisia Macías

Title Policing Citizenship
Author Patrisia Macías
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2006
Category Border patrols
Total Pages 428
ISBN UCAL:C3507429
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title Policing Citizenship and the New Public Management
Author Louise Amie Brown
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2008
Category Community policing
Total Pages 836
ISBN OCLC:681171496
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Suspect Citizens by Frank R. Baumgartner

Title Suspect Citizens
Author Frank R. Baumgartner
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2018-06-30
Category Law
Total Pages 302
ISBN 9781108429313
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The costs of racially disparate patterns of police behavior are high, but the crime fighting benefits are low.

Cpc by Anonim

Title CPC
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2016
Category
Total Pages 35
ISBN 0995493901
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Police Abuse in Contemporary Democracies
Author Michelle D. Bonner
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2018-03-28
Category Political Science
Total Pages 274
ISBN 9783319728834
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This volume offers a much-needed analysis of police abuse and its implications for our understanding of democracy. Sometimes referred to as police violence or police repression, police abuse occurs in all democracies. It is not an exception or a stage of democratization. It is, this volume argues, a structural and conceptual dimension of extant democracies. The book draws our attention to how including the study of policing into our analyses strengthens our understanding of democracy, including the persistence of hybrid democracy and the decline of democracy. To this end, the book examines three key dimensions of democracy: citizenship, accountability, and socioeconomic (in)equality. Drawing from political theory, comparative politics, and political economy, the book explores cases from France, the US, India, Argentina, Chile, South Africa, Brazil, and Canada, and reveals how integrating police abuse can contribute to a more robust study of democracy and government in general.

Citizen Spies by Joshua Reeves

Title Citizen Spies
Author Joshua Reeves
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2017-03-28
Category Social Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781479894901
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The history of recruiting citizens to spy on each other in the United States. Ever since the revelations of whistleblower Edward Snowden, we think about surveillance as the data-tracking digital technologies used by the likes of Google, the National Security Administration, and the military. But in reality, the state and allied institutions have a much longer history of using everyday citizens to spy and inform on their peers. Citizen Spies shows how “If You See Something, Say Something” is more than just a new homeland security program; it has been an essential civic responsibility throughout the history of the United States. From the town crier of Colonial America to the recruitment of youth through “junior police,” to the rise of Neighborhood Watch, AMBER Alerts, and Emergency 9-1-1, Joshua Reeves explores how ordinary citizens have been taught to carry out surveillance on their peers. Emphasizing the role humans play as “seeing” and “saying” subjects, he demonstrates how American society has continuously fostered cultures of vigilance, suspicion, meddling, snooping, and snitching. Tracing the evolution of police crowd-sourcing from “Hue and Cry” posters and America’s Most Wanted to police-affiliated social media, as well as the U.S.’s recurrent anxieties about political dissidents and ethnic minorities from the Red Scare to the War on Terror, Reeves teases outhow vigilance toward neighbors has long been aligned with American ideals of patriotic and moral duty. Taking the long view of the history of the citizen spy, this book offers a much-needed perspective for those interested in how we arrived at our current moment in surveillance culture and contextualizes contemporary trends in policing.

The Borders Of Punishment by Katja Franko Aas

Title The Borders of Punishment
Author Katja Franko Aas
Publisher OUP Oxford
Release Date 2013-07-11
Category Law
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9780191648137
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Borders of Punishment: Migration, Citizenship, and Social Exclusion critically assesses the relationship between immigration control, citizenship, and criminal justice. It reflects on the theoretical and methodological challenges posed by mass mobility and its control and for the first time, sets out a particular sub-field within criminology, the criminology of mobility. Drawing together leading international scholars with newer researchers, the book systematically outlines why criminology and criminal justice should pay more attention to issues of immigration and border control. Contributors consider how 'traditional' criminal justice institutions such as the criminal law, police, and prisons are being shaped and altered by immigration, as well as examining novel forms of penality (such as deportation and detention facilities), which have until now seldom featured in criminological studies and textbooks. In so doing, the book demonstrates that mobility and its control are matters that ought to be central to any understanding of the criminal justice system. Phenomena such as the controversial use of immigration law for the purposes of the war on terror, closed detention centres, deportation, and border policing, raise in new ways some of the fundamental and enduring questions of criminal justice and criminology: What is punishment? What is crime? What should be the normative and legal foundation for criminalization, for police suspicion, for the exclusion from the community, and for the deprivation of freedom? And who is the subject of rights within a society and what is the relevance of citizenship to criminal justice?

Policing Citizenship by Dana Cuomo

Title Policing Citizenship
Author Dana Cuomo
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2015
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN OCLC:927775825
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For most of United States history, the state did not intervene in violence perpetrated in the home. Women experiencing intimate partner violence had little recourse from state institutions for security or legal justice. This dissertation's inquiry centers on two policing practices that emerged in the 1980s to redress for the state's long history of ignoring intimate partner violence; preferred arrest and evidence-based prosecution. Through a feminist geographic analytic, I examine how these two practices affect intimate partner violence survivors' holistic security needs and ability to act as autonomous individuals. My research explores the contemporary state response to intimate partner violence by way of an institutional ethnography of the criminal justice system in Centre County, Pennsylvania. Throughout the dissertation, I grapple with a central challenge -- in order for women who experience intimate partner violence to claim political subjectivity, the state must criminalize such violence. However, as I illustrate, the state response to intimate partner violence is rooted in patriarchal protection that often reproduces the very same coercive dynamics inherent in abusive relations. Consequently, women who reach out to the state for help often find themselves re-entrenched in familiar positions of coercive control. To address this challenge, I engage with three principal concepts from critical geography; public and private, citizenship and neoliberalism. By analyzing the state response to intimate partner violence through the intersection of these three concepts, I examine intimate partner violence as more than a violent act that happens at the scale of the home and body. Rather, through the triangulation of these three concepts, I examine how the response to intimate partner violence is emblematic of the neoliberal state's abdication of social citizenship, its reregulation of spaces, subjects and insecurities, and the way patriarchal ideology remains central to the regulatory tools of neoliberal policing.

Arresting Citizenship by Amy E. Lerman

Title Arresting Citizenship
Author Amy E. Lerman
Publisher University of Chicago Press
Release Date 2014-06-06
Category Political Science
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780226137971
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The numbers are staggering: One-third of America’s adult population has passed through the criminal justice system and now has a criminal record. Many more were never convicted, but are nonetheless subject to surveillance by the state. Never before has the American government maintained so vast a network of institutions dedicated solely to the control and confinement of its citizens. A provocative assessment of the contemporary carceral state for American democracy, Arresting Citizenship argues that the broad reach of the criminal justice system has fundamentally recast the relation between citizen and state, resulting in a sizable—and growing—group of second-class citizens. From police stops to court cases and incarceration, at each stage of the criminal justice system individuals belonging to this disempowered group come to experience a state-within-a-state that reflects few of the country’s core democratic values. Through scores of interviews, along with analyses of survey data, Amy E. Lerman and Vesla M. Weaver show how this contact with police, courts, and prisons decreases faith in the capacity of American political institutions to respond to citizens’ concerns and diminishes the sense of full and equal citizenship—even for those who have not been found guilty of any crime. The effects of this increasingly frequent contact with the criminal justice system are wide-ranging—and pernicious—and Lerman and Weaver go on to offer concrete proposals for reforms to reincorporate this large group of citizens as active participants in American civic and political life.

Title The Politics of Policing in Greater China
Author Sonny Shiu-Hing Lo
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2016-11-21
Category Political Science
Total Pages 333
ISBN 9781137390707
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book examines the politics of policing in Greater China, including mainland China, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macao. As the author shows, police ideological indoctrination is strongest in mainland China, followed by Hong Kong, and Taiwan, where the police is under increasing political stress, in the aftermath of rising public protests and socio-political movements. Macao's police, on the other hand, is far less politicized and indoctrinated than their mainland Chinese counterpart. This book demonstrates that policing in China is a distinctive and extensive topic, as it involves not only crime control, but also crisis management and protest control, governance and corruption (or anti-corruption), the management of customs and immigration, the control over legal and illegal migrants, the transfer of criminals and extradition, and intergovernmental police cooperation and coordination. As economic integration is increasing rapidly in Greater China, this region's policing deserves special attention.

Policing Paris by Clifford D. Rosenberg

Title Policing Paris
Author Clifford D. Rosenberg
Publisher Cornell University Press
Release Date 2018-07-05
Category History
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9781501732324
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The surveillance of immigrants and potential terrorists preoccupies leaders throughout the industrialized world. Yet these concerns are hardly new. Policing Paris examines a critical moment in the history of immigration control and political surveillance. Drawing on massive police archives and other materials, Clifford Rosenberg shows how in the years after the Great War the French police, terrified by the Bolshevik Revolution and the specter of immigrant criminality, became the first major force anywhere systematically to enforce distinctions of citizenship and national origins. As the French capital emerged as a haven for refugees, dissidents, and workers from throughout Europe and across the Mediterranean in the 1920s, police officers raided immigrant neighborhoods to scare illegal aliens into registering with authorities and arrested those whose papers were not in order. The police began to concentrate on colonial workers from North Africa, tracking these workers with a special police brigade and segregating them in their own hospital when they fell ill. Transformed by their enforcement, legal categories that had existed for hundreds of years began to matter as never before. They determined whether or not families could remain together and whether people could keep their jobs or were forced to flee. During World War II, identity controls marked out entire populations for physical destruction. The treatment of foreigners during the Third Republic, Rosenberg contends, shaped the subsequent treatment of Jews by Vichy. At the same time, however, he argues that the new methods of identification pioneered between the wars are more directly relevant to the present day. They created forms of inclusion and inequality that remain pervasive, as industrial welfare states around the world find themselves compelled to provide benefits to their own citizens and recruit foreign nationals to satisfy their labor needs.

Policing Matters by Mary Gannon

Title Policing Matters
Author Mary Gannon
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2008
Category Law enforcement
Total Pages 69
ISBN 0946791317
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary: