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People Of The Rainforest by John Hemming

Title People of the Rainforest
Author John Hemming
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2020-02-01
Category Nature
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781787383005
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1945, three young brothers joined and eventually led Brazil's first government-sponsored expedition into its Amazonian rainforests. After more expeditions into unknown terrain, they became South America's most famous explorers, spending the rest of their lives with the resilient tribal communities they found there. People of the Rainforest recounts the Villas Boas brothers' four thrilling and dangerous 'first contacts' with isolated indigenous people, and their lifelong mission to learn about their societies and, above all, help them adapt to modern Brazil without losing their cultural heritage, identity and pride. Author and explorer John Hemming vividly traces the unique adventures of these extraordinary brothers, who used their fame to change attitudes to native peoples and to help protect the world's surviving tropical rainforests, under threat again today.

People Of The Rainforest by John Hemming

Title People of the Rainforest
Author John Hemming
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2020-02-01
Category Nature
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781787382992
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1945, three young brothers joined and eventually led Brazil's first government-sponsored expedition into its Amazonian rainforests. After more expeditions into unknown terrain, they became South America's most famous explorers, spending the rest of their lives with the resilient tribal communities they found there. People of the Rainforest recounts the Villas Boas brothers' four thrilling and dangerous 'first contacts' with isolated indigenous people, and their lifelong mission to learn about their societies and, above all, help them adapt to modern Brazil without losing their cultural heritage, identity and pride. Author and explorer John Hemming vividly traces the unique adventures of these extraordinary brothers, who used their fame to change attitudes to native peoples and to help protect the world's surviving tropical rainforests, under threat again today.

Title Rainforest Information Centre RIC Educational Supplement Indigenous People of the Rainforest
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2021
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN OCLC:45375339
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Presents a full-text, online educational publication entitled "Indigenous People of the Rainforest," provided by the Rainforest Information Centre (RIC), located in Lismore, New South Wales, Australia. Discusses various indigenous peoples located in rainforests, such as the Penan of Sarawak; the Yanomami of Brazil; the Kuku-Yalanji of North East Queensland, Australia; the Pygmies of Central Africa; and the Desana of Columbia. Includes facts on rainforests and rainforest protection. Provides information about recommended reading. Links to other RIC educational supplements.

Rainforest Warriors by Richard Price

Title Rainforest Warriors
Author Richard Price
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2012-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9780812221374
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Rainforest Warriors is a historical, ethnographic, and documentary account of a people, their threatened rainforest, and their successful attempt to harness international human rights law in their fight to protect their way of life--part of a larger story of tribal and indigenous peoples that is unfolding all over the globe. The Republic of Suriname, in northeastern South America, contains the highest proportion of rainforest within its national territory, and the most forest per person, of any country in the world. During the 1990s, its government began awarding extensive logging and mining concessions to multinational companies from China, Indonesia, Canada, and elsewhere. Saramaka Maroons, the descendants of self-liberated African slaves who had lived in that rainforest for more than 300 years, resisted, bringing their complaints to the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. In 2008, when the Inter-American Court of Human Rights delivered its landmark judgment in their favor, their efforts to protect their threatened rainforest were thrust into the international spotlight. Two leaders of the struggle to protect their way of life, Saramaka Headcaptain Wazen Eduards and Saramaka law student Hugo Jabini, were awarded the Goldman Prize for the Environment (often referred to as the environmental Nobel Prize), under the banner of "A New Precedent for Indigenous and Tribal Peoples." Anthropologist Richard Price, who has worked with Saramakas for more than forty years and who participated actively in this struggle, tells the gripping story of how Saramakas harnessed international human rights law to win control of their own piece of the Amazonian forest and guarantee their cultural survival.

People Of The Rain Forests by Anna Lewington

Title People of the Rain Forests
Author Anna Lewington
Publisher Heinemann/Raintree
Release Date 1998
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 48
ISBN 0817250611
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Describes the geography, plant and animal life, mineral resources, destruction, and environmental protection of the world's rain forests and how people live in this ecosystem.

Rainforest by Tony Juniper

Title Rainforest
Author Tony Juniper
Publisher Profile Books
Release Date 2018-03-29
Category Nature
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781782832492
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Rainforests are the lungs of our planet - regulators of the earth's temperature and weather. They are also home to 50 per cent of the world's animals and plants - which for centuries have been the source of many of our key medicines. And yet we've all heard of their systematic destruction; the raising of trees to make way for plantations of oil palms or cattle, the disenfranchisement of indigenous peoples, and the corruption that leads to illegal logging and pollution. But this is the full story you've never heard: an in depth, wide-ranging, first-hand narrative that not only looks at the state of the world's tropical rainforests today and the implications arising from their continuing decline, but also at what is being done, and can be done in future, to protect the forests and the 1.6 billion people that depend upon them. It is inspirational, too, in its descriptions of the rainforest's remarkable birds and plants ... and its indigenous people. Rainforest is a personal story, drawing on the author's many years' experience at the frontline of the fight to save the rainforests, explaining the science and history of the campaigns, and what it has felt like to be there, amid the conflicts and dilemmas.

Save The Planet by Corine Sombrun

Title Save The Planet
Author Corine Sombrun
Publisher IPG
Release Date 2018-07-03
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 144
ISBN 9781943156436
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Almir Sarayamoga Suruí, the Amazonian tribal chieftain of the indigenous Suruí people, is a leader in the fight to save the rainforest not only for the preservation of his land and people, but for the Earth's and humanity's survival as well. Joining forces with such high-tech corporations as Apple and Google Earth, Suruí has become a guardian of his people and a global activist, despite death threats and million dollar bounties on his head. A recipient of the Global Citizen Award in 2012, Suruí has calculated the direct cost of the loss of our rainforests—"the lungs of the Earth"—in terms of the total amount of Co2 that their destruction would release into the atmosphere, and the monetary loss that this would entail, and by using this carbon deficit formula, has leased access to pharmaceutical and cosmetic companies who have joined him in the stewardship of these endangered lands, their flora, fauna, and people.

Maya Roads by Mary Jo McConahay

Title Maya Roads
Author Mary Jo McConahay
Publisher Chicago Review Press
Release Date 2011
Category Social Science
Total Pages 260
ISBN 9781569765487
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

McConahay draws upon her three decades of traveling and living in Central America's remote landscapes to create a fascinating chronicle of the people, politics, archaeology, and species of the Central American rainforest, the cradle of Maya civilization.Captivated by the magnificence and mystery of the jungle, the author brings to life the intense beauty, the fantastic locales, the ancient ruins, and the horrific violence. She witnesses archaeological discoveries, the transformation of the Lacandon people, the Zapatista indigenous uprising in Mexico, increased drug trafficking, and assists in the uncovering of a war crime. Over the decades, McConahay has witnessed great changes in the region, and this is a unique tale of a woman's adventure and the adaptation and resolve of a people--From publisher description.

Title Borneo People of the Rainforest
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1998
Category Ethnology
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9810400632
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title A Death in the Rainforest
Author Don Kulick
Publisher Algonquin Books
Release Date 2019-06-18
Category Social Science
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781616209476
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

“Perhaps the finest and most profound account of ethnographic fieldwork and discovery that has ever entered the anthropological literature.” —The Wall Street Journal “If you want to experience a profoundly different culture without the exhausting travel (to say nothing of the cost), this is an excellent choice.” —The Washington Post One of Time’s 32 Books You Need to Read This Summer * One of National Geographic’s Best Travel Books of Summer As a young anthropologist, Don Kulick went to the tiny village of Gapun in New Guinea to document the death of the native language, Tayap. He arrived knowing that you can’t study a language without understanding the daily lives of the people who speak it: how they talk to their children, how they argue, how they gossip, how they joke. Over the course of thirty years, as he returned again and again to document the vanishing language, he found himself inexorably drawn into the lives and world of the Gapuners, and implicated in their destiny. In A Death in the Rainforest, Kulick takes us inside the village as he came to know it, revealing what it is like to live in a difficult-to-get-to village of two hundred people, carved out like a cleft in the middle of a tropical rainforest. And in doing so, he also gives us a brilliant interrogation of what it means to study a culture, an illuminating look at the impact of Western culture on the farthest reaches of the globe—and, ultimately, the story of why this anthropologist realized that he had to give up his study of this language and this village.

Rainforest Medicine by Jonathon Miller Weisberger

Title Rainforest Medicine
Author Jonathon Miller Weisberger
Publisher North Atlantic Books
Release Date 2013-09-17
Category Body, Mind & Spirit
Total Pages 432
ISBN 9781583946237
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Chronicling the practices, legends, and wisdom of the vanishing traditions of the upper Amazon, this book reveals the area's indigenous peoples' approach to living in harmony with the natural world. Rainforest Medicine features in-depth essays on plant-based medicine and indigenous science from four distinct Amazonian societies: deep forest and urban, lowland rainforest and mountain. The book is illustrated with unique botanical and cultural drawings by Secoya elder and traditional healer Agustin Payaguaje and horticulturalist Thomas Y. Wang as well as by the author himself. Payaguaje shares his sincere imaginal view into the spiritual life of the Secoya; plates of petroglyphs from the sacred valley of Cotundo relate to an ancient language, and other illustrations show traditional Secoya ayahuasca symbols and indigenous origin myths. Two color sections showcase photos of the plants and people of the region, and include plates of previously unpublished full-color paintings by Pablo Cesar Amaringo (1938-2009), an acclaimed Peruvian artist renowned for his intricate, colorful depictions of his visions from drinking the entheogenic plant brew, ayahuasca ("vine of the soul" in Quechua languages). Today the once-dense mysterious rainforest realms are under assault as the indiscriminate colonial frontier of resource extraction moves across the region; as the forest disappears, the traditional human legacy of sustainable utilization of this rich ecosystem is also being buried under modern realities. With over 20 years experience of ground-level environmental and cultural conservation, author Jonathon Miller Weisberger's commitment to preserving the fascinating, unfathomably precious relics of the indigenous legacy shines through. Chief among these treasures is the "shimmering" "golden" plant-medicine science of ayahuasca or yajé, a rainforest vine that was popularized in the 1950s by Western travelers such as William Burroughs and Alan Ginsberg. It has been sampled, reviled, and celebrated by outsiders ever since. Currently sought after by many in the industrialized West for its powerful psychotropic and life-transforming effects, this sacred brew is often imbibed by visitors to the upper Amazon and curious seekers in faraway venues, sometimes with little to no working knowledge of its principles and precepts. Perceiving that there is an evident need for in-depth information on ayahuasca if it is to be used beyond its traditional context for healing and spiritual illumination in the future, Miller Weisberger focuses on the fundamental knowledge and practices that guide the use of ayahuasca in indigenous cultures. Weaving first-person narrative with anthropological and ethnobotanical information, Rainforest Medicine aims to preserve both the record and ongoing reality of ayahuasca's unique tradition and, of course, the priceless forest that gave birth to these sacred vines. Featuring words from Amazonian shamans--the living torchbearers of these sophisticated spiritual practices--the book stands as testimony to this sacred plant medicine's power in shaping and healing individuals, communities, and nature alike. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Amazon by Mark J. Plotkin

Title The Amazon
Author Mark J. Plotkin
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 2020
Category Nature
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780190668297
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Rainforests occupy a special place in the imagination. Literary, historical and cinematic depictions range from a ghastly Green Hell to an idyllic Garden of Eden. In terms of fiction, they fired the already fervent imaginations of storytellers as diverse as Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Edgar Rice Burroughs, Rudyard Kipling and even George Lucas and Steven Spielberg in whose books and films they are inhabited by dinosaurs, trod by Indiana Jones, prowled by Mowgli the Jungle Boy and swung through by Tarzan of the Apes. But rainforest fact is no less fascinating than rainforest fiction. Brimming with mystery and intrigue, these forests still harbor lost cities, uncontacted tribes, ancient shamans, and powerful plants than can kill - and cure. The rainforest bestiary extends far beyond the requisite lions, tigers and bears. Flying foxes and winged lizards, arboreal anteaters, rainforest giraffes, cross-dressing spiders that disguise themselves as ants and bats the size of a bumblebees all flourish in these most fabulous of forests along with other zoological denizens that are equally bizarre and spectacular. And no scientist immersed in these ecosystems believes that all the wonders have been found or revealed. Tropical rainforests merit their moniker. They flourish in the tropics - the more than 3000 mile-wide equatorial band between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn. And these forests are hot, humid and wet, receiving in the Amazon, on average from 60 to 120 inches of rain per year - as compared to a mere 25 inches in London or 45 inches in Manhattan. However, several sites in the rainforests of northeastern India, of west Africa and western Colombia are drenched by over 400 inches of precipitation per annum. To a large degree, rainfall in the tropics is determined by the so-called "Intertropical Convergence Zone" (ICZ), a band of clouds around the equator created by the meeting of the northeast and southeast trade winds. Also referred to as the "Monsoon Trough," and known to - and dreaded by - sailors over the centuries as the "Doldrums," since the extended periods of calm that sometimes manifested there could strand a sailing vessel for weeks. The constant cloud cover due to the ICZ, the ferocious heat, and the abundant rainfall combine to produce high humidity, sometimes close to 95 per cent in the Amazon, a challenge for visitors unused to such torpor. According to Rhett Butler of Mongabay: "Each canopy tree transpires 200 gallons of water annually, translating roughly into 20,000 gallons transpired into the atmosphere for every acre of canopy trees. Large rainforests (and their humidity) contribute to the formation of rain clouds, and generate as much as 75 per cent of their own rain and are therefore responsible for creating as much as 50 per cent of their own precipitation.""--

The Unconquered by Scott Wallace

Title The Unconquered
Author Scott Wallace
Publisher Crown
Release Date 2011-10-18
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9780307462985
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The extraordinary true story of a journey into the deepest recesses of the Amazon to track one of the planet's last uncontacted indigenous tribes. Even today there remain tribes in the far reaches of the Amazon rainforest that have avoided contact with modern civilization. Deliberately hiding from the outside world, they are the last survivors of an ancient culture that predates the arrival of Columbus in the New World. In this gripping first-person account of adventure and survival, author Scott Wallace chronicles an expedition into the Amazon’s uncharted depths, discovering the rainforest’s secrets while moving ever closer to a possible encounter with one such tribe—the mysterious flecheiros, or “People of the Arrow,” seldom-glimpsed warriors known to repulse all intruders with showers of deadly arrows. On assignment for National Geographic, Wallace joins Brazilian explorer Sydney Possuelo at the head of a thirty-four-man team that ventures deep into the unknown in search of the tribe. Possuelo’s mission is to protect the Arrow People. But the information he needs to do so can only be gleaned by entering a world of permanent twilight beneath the forest canopy. Danger lurks at every step as the expedition seeks out the Arrow People even while trying to avoid them. Along the way, Wallace uncovers clues as to who the Arrow People might be, how they have managed to endure as one of the last unconquered tribes, and why so much about them must remain shrouded in mystery if they are to survive. Laced with lessons from anthropology and the Amazon’s own convulsed history, and boasting a Conradian cast of unforgettable characters—all driven by a passion to preserve the wild, but also wracked by fear, suspicion, and the desperate need to make it home alive—The Unconquered reveals this critical battleground in the fight to save the planet as it has rarely been seen, wrapped in a page-turning tale of adventure.

Amazonia by Angela Gennino

Title Amazonia
Author Angela Gennino
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1990
Category Amazon River Region
Total Pages 92
ISBN STANFORD:36105011648610
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the Introduction: Hundreds of South American organizations are defending the Amazon and its inhabitants, but most do not even know there are people in the North deeply concerned about the issue. Those who do know have their own questions: "How can we get support around the world? Is it true that North American and European organizations get millions of dollars to save the rainforests? How do they spend all that money? Who are the people behind these groups like the Rainforest Action Network? What are other organizations doing in the rest of the Amazon?" This Action Guide was born of the need to address just such questions. It is designed and an organizing tool to help people and groups who are about to plunge into Amazonian work for the first time. The bulk of the guide is a directory of more than 250 organizations who are working on the issue, from the most remote parts of the jungle to the lobbying offices of Washington and London. But the Action Guide is more than addresses and fax numbers. Unless the social and political complexities of life in the Amazon are understood, all the international campaigns and good intentions in the world will not keep a single tree standing. This guide, then, spotlights the grassroots movements of Amazon's indigenous peoples, rubber tappers, and other forest dwellers. No other people have worked so hard and as long to defend the forest. No other people understand as well the meaning-and importance-of sustainable development and conservation. With this in mind, the Action Guide staff, for the first time, asked Amazonian grassroots organizations what they wanted the world to know about their goals, strategies, and special needs to make their work more effective. The information for more than 100 profiles was compiled from a series of questionnaires and from interviews conducted by Monti Aguirre and Glenn Switkes during their filming of AMAZONIA: Voices from the Rainforest, a documentary for which this publication is intended as a companion guide. Some 150 activist organizations working on Amazonian issues in Latin America, Europe, North America, and in the Asia/Pacific region, as well as resource groups of funders, researchers, and technical specialists responded to similar questionnaires.

Title Adaptive Responses of Native Amazonians
Author Raymond B. Hames
Publisher Elsevier
Release Date 2014-06-28
Category Science
Total Pages 516
ISBN 9781483294230
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Adaptive Responses of Native Amazonians

Amazon Rainforest by William B. Rice

Title Amazon Rainforest
Author William B. Rice
Publisher Teacher Created Materials
Release Date 2012-01-30
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 32
ISBN 1433336715
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A journey through the Amazon Rainforest introduces its people, plant life, and animals.

The Bama by Timothy Bottoms

Title The Bama
Author Timothy Bottoms
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1992
Category Aboriginal Australians
Total Pages 32
ISBN 0646127276
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Spirit Of The Rainforest by Mark A. Ritchie

Title Spirit of the Rainforest
Author Mark A. Ritchie
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1996
Category Amazonas (Venezuela)
Total Pages 271
ISBN UOM:39015047488807
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Yanamamo of the Amazon -- endangered children of nature or indigenous warmongers on the verge of destroying themselves? Now for the first time, a powerful Yanomamo shaman speaks for his people. Jungleman provides shocking, never-before-answered accounts of life-or-death battles among his people -- and perhaps even more disturbing among the spirits who fight for their souls. Brutally riveting, the story of Jungleman is an extraordinary and powerful document.

Title The Amazon Rain Forest and Its People
Author Marion Morrison
Publisher Raintree
Release Date 1993
Category Amazon River Region
Total Pages 48
ISBN 1568470878
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Describes the conditions in the Amazon rain forest, the animals, plants, and people that live there, the exploitation of this ecosystem, and the importance of preserving it.

How Forests Think by Eduardo Kohn

Title How Forests Think
Author Eduardo Kohn
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2013-08-10
Category Science
Total Pages 267
ISBN 9780520276109
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Can forests think? Do dogs dream? In this astonishing book, Eduardo Kohn challenges the very foundations of anthropology, calling into question our central assumptions about what it means to be human—and thus distinct from all other life forms. Based on four years of fieldwork among the Runa of Ecuador’s Upper Amazon, Eduardo Kohn draws on his rich ethnography to explore how Amazonians interact with the many creatures that inhabit one of the world’s most complex ecosystems. Whether or not we recognize it, our anthropological tools hinge on those capacities that make us distinctly human. However, when we turn our ethnographic attention to how we relate to other kinds of beings, these tools (which have the effect of divorcing us from the rest of the world) break down. How Forests Think seizes on this breakdown as an opportunity. Avoiding reductionistic solutions, and without losing sight of how our lives and those of others are caught up in the moral webs we humans spin, this book skillfully fashions new kinds of conceptual tools from the strange and unexpected properties of the living world itself. In this groundbreaking work, Kohn takes anthropology in a new and exciting direction–one that offers a more capacious way to think about the world we share with other kinds of beings.