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Notre Dame Vs The Klan by Todd Tucker

Title Notre Dame vs The Klan
Author Todd Tucker
Publisher University of Notre Dame Pess
Release Date 2018-08-15
Category Political Science
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780268104368
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1924, two uniquely American institutions clashed in northern Indiana: the University of Notre Dame and the Ku Klux Klan. Todd Tucker’s book, published for the first time in paperback, Notre Dame vs. The Klan tells the shocking story of the three-day confrontation in the streets of South Bend, Indiana, that would change both institutions forever. When the Ku Klux Klan announced plans to stage a parade and rally in South Bend, hoping to target college campuses for recruitment starting with Notre Dame, a large group of students defied their leaders’ pleas to ignore the Klan and remain on campus. Tucker dramatically recounts the events as only a proficient storyteller can. Readers will find themselves drawn into the fray of these tumultuous times. Tucker structures this compelling tale around three individuals: D.C. Stephenson, the leader of the KKK in Indiana, the state with the largest Klan membership in America; Fr. Matthew Walsh, the young and charismatic president of the University of Notre Dame; and a composite of a Notre Dame student at the time, represented by Bill Foohey, who was an actual participant in the clash. This book will appeal not only to Notre Dame fans, but to those interested in South Bend and Indiana history and the history of the Klu Klux Klan, including modern-day Klan violence.

Title The Ku Klux Klan in the Heartland
Author James H. Madison
Publisher Indiana University Press
Release Date 2020-10-06
Category History
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9780253052209
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Who is an American?" asked the Ku Klux Klan. It is a question that echoes as loudly today as it did in the early twentieth century. But who really joined the Klan? Were they "hillbillies, the Great Unteachables" as one journalist put it? It would be comforting to think so, but how then did they become one of the most powerful political forces in our nation's history? In The Ku Klux Klan in the Heartland, renowned historian James H. Madison details the creation and reign of the infamous organization. Through the prism of their operations in Indiana and the Midwest, Madison explores the Klan's roots in respectable white protestant society. Convinced that America was heading in the wrong direction because of undesirable "un-American" elements, Klan members did not see themselves as bigoted racist extremists but as good Christian patriots joining proudly together in a righteous moral crusade. The Ku Klux Klan in the Heartland offers a detailed history of this powerful organization and examines how, through its use of intimidation, religious belief, and the ballot box, the ideals of Klan in the 1920s have on-going implications for America today.

Rope And Faggot by Walter White

Title Rope and Faggot
Author Walter White
Publisher University of Notre Dame Pess
Release Date 2002-01-02
Category Social Science
Total Pages 328
ISBN 9780268096816
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1926, Walter White, then assistant secretary of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, broke the story of an especially horrific triple lynching in Aiken, South Carolina. Aiken was White's forty-first lynching investigation in eight years. He returned to New York drained by the experience. The following year he took a leave of absence from the NAACP and, with help from a Guggenheim grant, spent a year in France writing Rope and Faggot. Ironically subtitled "A Biography of Judge Lynch," Rope and Faggot is a compelling example of partisan scholarship and is based on White's first-hand investigations. It was published in 1929. The book met two important goals for White: it debunked the "big lie" that lynching punished black men for raping white women and protected the purity of "the flower of the white race," and it provided White with an opportunity to deliver a penetrating critique of the southern culture that nourished this form of blood sport. White marshaled statistics demonstrating that accusations of rape or attempted rape accounted for less than 30 percent of the lynchings. Presenting evidence of white females of all classes crossing the color line for love—evidence that white supremacists themselves used to agitate whites to support anti-miscegenation laws—White insisted that most interracial unions were consensual and not forced. Despite the emphasis on sexual issues in instances of lynching, White also argued that the fury and sadism with which mobs attacked victims had more to do with keeping blacks in their place and with controlling the black labor force. Some of the strongest sections of the book deal with White's analysis of the economic and cultural foundations of lynching. Walter White's powerful study of a shameful practice in modern American history is back in print with a new introduction by Kenneth R. Janken.

Keeping Canada British by James M. Pitsula

Title Keeping Canada British
Author James M. Pitsula
Publisher UBC Press
Release Date 2013-05-31
Category History
Total Pages 308
ISBN 9780774824927
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Ku Klux Klan had its origins in the American South. It was suppressed but rose again in the 1920s, spreading into Canada, especially Saskatchewan. This book offers a new interpretation for the appeal of the Klan in 1920s Saskatchewan. It argues that the Klan should not be portrayed merely as an irrational outburst of intolerance but as a populist aftershock of the Great War and a slightly more extreme version of mainstream opinion that wanted to keep Canada British. Through its meticulous exploration of a controversial issue central to the history of Saskatchewan and the formation of national identity, this book shines light upon a dark corner of Canada's past.

Title The Second Coming of the KKK The Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s and the American Political Tradition
Author Linda Gordon
Publisher Liveright Publishing
Release Date 2017-10-24
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781631493706
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An urgent examination into the revived Klan of the 1920s becomes “required reading” for our time (New York Times Book Review). Extraordinary national acclaim accompanied the publication of award-winning historian Linda Gordon’s disturbing and markedly timely history of the reassembled Ku Klux Klan of the 1920s. Dramatically challenging our preconceptions of the hooded Klansmen responsible for establishing a Jim Crow racial hierarchy in the 1870s South, this “second Klan” spread in states principally above the Mason-Dixon line by courting xenophobic fears surrounding the flood of immigrant “hordes” landing on American shores. “Part cautionary tale, part expose” (Washington Post), The Second Coming of the KKK “illuminates the surprising scope of the movement” (The New Yorker); the Klan attracted four-to-six-million members through secret rituals, manufactured news stories, and mass “Klonvocations” prior to its collapse in 1926—but not before its potent ideology of intolerance became part and parcel of the American tradition. A “must-read” (Salon) for anyone looking to understand the current moment, The Second Coming of the KKK offers “chilling comparisons to the present day” (New York Review of Books).

Notre Dame And The Civil War by James M. Schmidt

Title Notre Dame and the Civil War
Author James M. Schmidt
Publisher History Press (SC)
Release Date 2010
Category Education
Total Pages 142
ISBN 1596298790
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

While many institutions of higher education made great sacrifices during the Civil War, few can boast of the dedication and effort made by the University of Notre Dame. For four years, Notre Dame gave freely of its faculty and students as soldiers, sent its Holy Cross priests to the camps and battlefields as chaplains and dispatched its sisters to the hospitals as nurses. Though far from the battlefields, the war was ever-present on campus, as Notre Dame witnessed fisticuffs among the student body, provided a home to the children of a famous general, responded to political harassment and tried to keep at least some of its community from the fray. At war's end, a proud Notre Dame welcomed back several bona fide war heroes and became home to a unique veterans' organization.

Title White Robes and Burning Crosses
Author Michael Newton
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2016-04-14
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 316
ISBN 9781476617190
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

With its fiery crosses and nightriders in pointed hoods and flowing robes, the Ku Klux Klan remains a recurring nightmare in American life. What began in the earliest post–Civil War days as a social group engaging in drunken hijinks at the expense of perceived inferiors soon turned into a murderous paramilitary organization determined to resist the “evils” of radical Reconstruction. For six generations and counting, the Klan has inflicted misery and death on countless victims nationwide and since the early 1920s, has expanded into distant corners of the globe. From the Klan’s post–Civil War lynchings in support of Jim Crow laws, to its bloody stand against desegregation during the 1960s, to its continued violence in the militia movement at the turn of the 21st century, this revealing volume chronicles the complete history of the world’s oldest surviving terrorist organization from 1866 to the present. The story is told without embellishment because, as this work demonstrates, the truth about the Ku Klux Klan is grim enough.

Precarious Democracies by Ana María Bejarano

Title Precarious Democracies
Author Ana María Bejarano
Publisher Helen Kellogg Institute for In
Release Date 2011
Category History
Total Pages 350
ISBN 0268022267
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Recent titles from the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies."

Title The Coddling of the American Mind
Author Greg Lukianoff
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2018-09-04
Category Social Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780735224902
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Something is going wrong on many college campuses in the last few years. Rates of anxiety, depression, and suicide are rising. Speakers are shouted down. Students and professors say they are walking on eggshells and afraid to speak honestly. How did this happen? First Amendment expert Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt show how the new problems on campus have their origins in three terrible ideas that have become increasingly woven into American childhood and education: what doesn’t kill you makes you weaker; always trust your feelings; and life is a battle between good people and evil people. These three Great Untruths are incompatible with basic psychological principles, as well as ancient wisdom from many cultures. They interfere with healthy development. Anyone who embraces these untruths—and the resulting culture of safetyism—is less likely to become an autonomous adult able to navigate the bumpy road of life. Lukianoff and Haidt investigate the many social trends that have intersected to produce these untruths. They situate the conflicts on campus in the context of America’s rapidly rising political polarization, including a rise in hate crimes and off-campus provocation. They explore changes in childhood including the rise of fearful parenting, the decline of unsupervised play, and the new world of social media that has engulfed teenagers in the last decade. This is a book for anyone who is confused by what is happening on college campuses today, or has children, or is concerned about the growing inability of Americans to live, work, and cooperate across party lines.

Why Choose The Liberal Arts by Mark William Roche

Title Why Choose the Liberal Arts
Author Mark William Roche
Publisher University of Notre Dame Pess
Release Date 2010-08-20
Category Education
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780268091743
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In a world where the value of a liberal arts education is no longer taken for granted, Mark William Roche lucidly and passionately argues for its essential importance. Drawing on more than thirty years of experience in higher education as a student, faculty member, and administrator, Roche deftly connects the broad theoretical perspective of educators to the practical needs and questions of students and their parents. Roche develops three overlapping arguments for a strong liberal arts education: first, the intrinsic value of learning for its own sake, including exploration of the profound questions that give meaning to life; second, the cultivation of intellectual virtues necessary for success beyond the academy; and third, the formative influence of the liberal arts on character and on the development of a sense of higher purpose and vocation. Together with his exploration of these three values—intrinsic, practical, and idealistic—Roche reflects on ways to integrate them, interweaving empirical data with personal experience. Why Choose the Liberal Arts? is an accessible and thought-provoking work of interest to students, parents, and administrators.

Atomic America by Todd Tucker

Title Atomic America
Author Todd Tucker
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2009-03-03
Category History
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781439158289
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

On January 3, 1961, nuclear reactor SL-1 exploded in rural Idaho, spreading radioactive contamination over thousands of acres and killing three men: John Byrnes, Richard McKinley, and Richard Legg. The Army blamed "human error" and a sordid love triangle. Though it has been overshadowed by the accident at Three Mile Island, SL-1 is the only fatal nuclear reactor incident in American history, and it holds serious lessons for a nation poised to embrace nuclear energy once again. Historian Todd Tucker, who first heard the rumors about the Idaho Falls explosion as a trainee in the Navy's nuclear program, suspected there was more to the accident than the rumors suggested. Poring over hundreds of pages of primary sources and interviewing the surviving players led him to a tale of shocking negligence and subterfuge. The Army and its contractors had deliberately obscured the true causes of this terrible accident, the result of poor engineering as much as uncontrolled passions. A bigger story opened up before him about the frantic race for nuclear power among the Army, the Navy, and the Air Force -- a race that started almost the moment the nuclear bombs were dropped on Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS), where the meltdown occurred, had been a proving ground where engineers, generals, and admirals attempted to make real the Atomic Age dream of unlimited power. Some of their most ambitious plans bore fruit -- like that of the nation's unofficial nuclear patriarch, Admiral Rickover, whose "true submarine," the USS Nautilus, would forever change naval warfare. Others, like the Air Force's billion dollar quest for a nuclear-powered airplane, never came close. The Army's ultimate goal was to construct small, portable reactors to power the Arctic bases that functioned as sentinels against a Soviet sneak attack. At the height of its program, the Army actually constructed a nuclear powered city inside a glacier in Greenland. But with the meltdown in Idaho came the end of the Army's program and the beginning of the Navy's longstanding monopoly on military nuclear power. The dream of miniaturized, portable nuclear plants died with McKinley, Legg, and Byrnes. The demand for clean energy has revived the American nuclear power industry. Chronic instability in the Middle East and fears of global warming have united an unlikely coalition of conservative isolationists and fretful environmentalists, all of whom are fighting for a buildup of the emission-free power source that is already quietly responsible for nearly 20 percent of the American energy supply. More than a hundred nuclear plants generate electricity in the United States today. Thirty-two new reactors are planned. All are descendants of SL-1. With so many plants in operation, and so many more on the way, it is vitally important to examine the dangers of poor design, poor management, and the idea that a nuclear power plant can be inherently safe. Tucker sets the record straight in this fast-paced narrative history, advocating caution and accountability in harnessing this feared power source.

The Mind Of Oliver C Cox by Christopher McAuley

Title The Mind of Oliver C Cox
Author Christopher McAuley
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2004
Category History
Total Pages 296
ISBN STANFORD:36105114347599
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Born in Trinidad in 1901, Oliver C. Cox immigrated to the US in 1919, establishing himself as a controversial sociologist. McAuley's approach to Cox's life and work is shaped by his belief that Cox's Caribbean upbringing and background gave him an unorthodox perspective on race and social change.

Title Father Luis Olivares a Biography
Author Mario T. García
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2018-08-01
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 560
ISBN 9781469643328
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is the amazing untold story of the Los Angeles sanctuary movement's champion, Father Luis Olivares (1934–1993), a Catholic priest and a charismatic, faith-driven leader for social justice. Beginning in 1980 and continuing for most of the decade, hundreds of thousands of Salvadoran and Guatemalan refugees made the hazardous journey to the United States, seeking asylum from political repression and violence in their home states. Instead of being welcomed by the "country of immigrants," they were rebuffed by the Reagan administration, which supported the governments from which they fled. To counter this policy, a powerful sanctuary movement rose up to provide safe havens in churches and synagogues for thousands of Central American refugees. Based on previously unexplored archives and over ninety oral histories, this compelling biography traces the life of a complex and constantly evolving individual, from Olivares's humble beginnings in San Antonio, Texas, to his close friendship with legendary civil rights leader Cesar Chavez and his historic leadership of the United Neighborhoods Organization and the sanctuary movement.

Title This Place Called Notre Dame
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2018-08-15
Category Education
Total Pages 200
ISBN 0268104816
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Matt Cashore, a 1994 graduate of Notre Dame, has been photographing the university for over twenty years, and was named the 2016 University Photographer of the Year by the University Photographers Association of America. Kerry Temple is a 1974 Notre Dame graduate who has been writing about the university for forty years and serves as the editor of Notre Dame Magazine. Cashore and Temple have combined their talents in a magnificent new coffee-table book, This Place Called Notre Dame. Cashore's photographs beautifully document campus life, capturing the quads, the architecture, the academics, football festivities, the faith life, and student fun of contemporary Notre Dame. Now these images have been collected into one volume conveying the beauty, character, and spirit of the university. Accompanying Cashore's photographs is text by Kerry Temple, an astute university observer and writer whose articles and essays have chronicled the nature, traditions, and growth of Notre Dame over the past four decades. The result of this collaboration is a volume that speaks of Notre Dame with insight, artistry, and affection that will be treasured and enjoyed by students, alumni, faculty, staff, and all who have experienced and love the university.

Unlearning Liberty by Greg Lukianoff

Title Unlearning Liberty
Author Greg Lukianoff
Publisher Encounter Books
Release Date 2014-03-11
Category Education
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781594037337
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For over a generation, shocking cases of censorship at America’s colleges and universities have taught students the wrong lessons about living in a free society. Drawing on a decade of experience battling for freedom of speech on campus, First Amendment lawyer Greg Lukianoff reveals how higher education fails to teach students to become critical thinkers: by stifling open debate, our campuses are supercharging ideological divisions, promoting groupthink, and encouraging an unscholarly certainty about complex issues. Lukianoff walks readers through the life of a modern-day college student, from orientation to the end of freshman year. Through this lens, he describes startling violations of free speech rights: a student in Indiana punished for publicly reading a book, a student in Georgia expelled for a pro-environment collage he posted on Facebook, students at Yale banned from putting an F. Scott Fitzgerald quote on a T shirt, and students across the country corralled into tiny “free speech zones” when they wanted to express their views. But Lukianoff goes further, demonstrating how this culture of censorship is bleeding into the larger society. As he explores public controversies involving Juan Williams, Rush Limbaugh, Bill Maher, Richard Dawkins, Larry Summers—even Dave Barry and Jon Stewart—Lukianoff paints a stark picture of our ability as a nation to discuss important issues rationally. Unlearning Liberty: Campus Censorship and the End of American Debate illuminates how intolerance for dissent and debate on today’s campus threatens the freedom of every citizen and makes us all just a little bit dumber.

Title The Publishers Weekly
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2006
Category American literature
Total Pages 86
ISBN UCSD:31822034377747
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Shake Down The Thunder by Murray A. Sperber

Title Shake Down the Thunder
Author Murray A. Sperber
Publisher Indiana University Press
Release Date 2002
Category Education
Total Pages 634
ISBN 0253215684
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Sperber. . .tackles the details, great and small, unearthing a treasure." --New York Times Book Review Shake Down the Thunder traces the history of the Notre Dame football program--which has acquired almost mythical proportions--from its humble origins in the 19th century to its status as the paragon of college sports. It presents the true story of the program's formative years, the reality behind the myths. Both social history and sports history, this book documents as never before the first half-century of Notre Dame football and relates it to the rise of big-time intercollegiate athletics, the college sports reform movement, and the corrupt sporting press of the period. Shake Down the Thunder is must reading for all Fighting Irish fans, their detractors, and any reader engaged by American cultural history.

Reforming Our Universities by David Horowitz

Title Reforming Our Universities
Author David Horowitz
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2010-08-10
Category Political Science
Total Pages 285
ISBN 9781596981577
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

It’s no secret that our universities have become hotbeds of radical leftist thought. While professors and administrators pay lip-service to concepts like open-mindedness and robust debate, they try to squash any opinion that doesn’t match their radical left world view. World-renowned campus activist David Horowitz wants to bring diversity back to the college campus. Horowitz describes his decades-long campaign against intellectual bigotry, grade discrimination, and the denial of basic rights to any and all whose opinions diverge from the extreme liberal orthodoxy.

Isn T That Clever by Steven Gimbel

Title Isn t that Clever
Author Steven Gimbel
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2017-06-26
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 196
ISBN 9781351622615
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Isn’t That Clever provides a new account of the nature of humor – the cleverness account – according to which humor is intentional conspicuous acts of playful cleverness. By defining humor in this way, answers can be found to longstanding questions about humor ethics (Are there jokes that are wrong to tell? Are there jokes that can only be told by certain people?) and humor aesthetics (What makes for a good joke? Is humor subjective?). In addition to humor in general, Isn’t That Clever asks questions about comedy as an art form such as whether there are limits to what can be said in dealing with a heckler and how do we determine whether one comedian has stolen jokes from another.

Life Of A Klansman by Edward Ball

Title Life of a Klansman
Author Edward Ball
Publisher Farrar, Straus and Giroux
Release Date 2020-08-04
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780374720261
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Named a best book of the summer by Literary Hub The life and times of a militant white supremacist, written by one of his offspring, National Book Award–winner Edward Ball Life of a Klansman tells the story of a warrior in the Ku Klux Klan, a carpenter in Louisiana who took up the cause of fanatical racism during the years after the Civil War. Edward Ball, a descendant of the Klansman, paints a portrait of his family’s anti-black militant that is part history, part memoir rich in personal detail. Sifting through family lore about “our Klansman” as well as public and private records, Ball reconstructs the story of his great-great grandfather, Constant Lecorgne. A white French Creole, father of five, and working class ship carpenter, Lecorgne had a career in white terror of notable and bloody completeness: massacres, night riding, masked marches, street rampages—all part of a tireless effort that he and other Klansmen made to restore white power when it was threatened by the emancipation of four million enslaved African Americans. To offer a non-white view of the Ku-klux, Ball seeks out descendants of African Americans who were once victimized by “our Klansman” and his comrades, and shares their stories. For whites, to have a Klansman in the family tree is no rare thing: Demographic estimates suggest that fifty percent of whites in the United States have at least one ancestor who belonged to the Ku Klux Klan at some point in its history. That is, one-half of white Americans could write a Klan family memoir, if they wished. In an era when racist ideology and violence are again loose in the public square, Life of a Klansman offers a personal origin story of white supremacy. Ball’s family memoir traces the vines that have grown from militant roots in the Old South into the bitter fruit of the present, when whiteness is again a cause that can veer into hate and domestic terror.