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Title Minutes of the Charles Olson Society
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2003
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN STANFORD:36105123020195
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Selected Letters by Charles Olson

Title Selected Letters
Author Charles Olson
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2001-02-21
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 532
ISBN 9780520918009
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For Charles Olson, letters were not only a daily means of communication with friends but were at the same time a vehicle for exploratory thought. In fact, many of Olson's finest works, including Projective Verse and the Maximus Poems, were formulated as letters. Olson's letters are important to an understanding of his definition of the postmodern, and through the play of mind exhibited here we recognize him as one of the vital thinkers of the twentieth century. In this volume, edited and annotated by Ralph Maud, we see Olson at the height of his powers and also at his most human. Nearly 200 letters, selected from a known 3,000, demonstrate the wide range of Olson's interests and the depth of his concern for the future. Maud includes letters to friends and loved ones, job and grant applications, letters of recommendation, and Black Mountain College business letters, as well as correspondence illuminating Olson's poetics. As we read through the letters, which span the years from 1931, when Olson was an undergraduate, to his death in 1970, a fascinating portrait of this complex poet and thinker emerges.

Title The Collected Letters of Charles Olson and J H Prynne
Author Ryan Dobran
Publisher University of New Mexico Press
Release Date 2017-06-01
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9780826358332
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Edited by poet and scholar Ryan Dobran, this volume of correspondence between the American poet Charles Olson (1910–1970) and the English poet J. H. Prynne (b. 1936) sheds light on a little-known but incredibly influential aspect of twentieth-century transatlantic literary culture. Never before published, the letters capture their shared passion for knowledge as well as their distinct writing styles. Written between 1961 and Olson’s death in 1970, the letters display the mutual admiration and intimacy that developed between the two poets after Prynne initiated their exchange when pursuing work for the literary magazine Prospect. This work illustrates how Olson and Prynne influenced each other, and it represents an important step toward understanding their contributions to poetics on both sides of the Atlantic.

Title Staying Open Charles Olson s Sources and Influences
Author Joshua S. Hoeynck
Publisher Vernon Press
Release Date 2019-05-03
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 322
ISBN 9781622734306
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

“Staying Open, Charles Olson’s Sources and Influences” investigates the inter-disciplinary influences on the work of the mid-Century American poet, Charles Olson. This edited collection of essays covers Olson’s diverse non-literary interests, including his engagement with the music of John Cage and Pierre Boulez, his interests in abstract expressionism, and his readings of philosopher Alfred North Whitehead. The essays also examine Olson’s pedagogy, which he developed in the experimental environment at Black Mountain College, as well as his six-month archeological journey through the Yucatan Peninsula in 1950 to explore the culture of the Maya. This book will, therefore, be a strong research aid to scholars working in diverse fields – music, archeology, pedagogy, philosophy, art, and psychology – as it outlines methods for close inter-disciplinary work that can uncover the mechanics of Olson’s creative, literary processes. Building on the straightforward scholarship of George Butterick, whose Guide to the Maximus Poems remains indispensable for readers of Olson’s work, the essays in this volume will also guide readers through the thick allusions within The Maximus Poems itself. New interest in the wide-ranging and non-literary nature of Olson’s thought in several recent academic works makes this book both timely and necessary. Physics Envy: American Poetry and Science in the Cold War and After by Peter Middleton as well as Contemporary Olson edited by David Herd have started the process of uncovering the extent to which Olson’s inter-disciplinary interests inflected his poetic compositions. “Staying Open” extends the preliminary investigations of Olson’s non-literary sources in those volumes by bringing together a community of scholars working across disciplines and within a wide variety of humanistic concerns.

Title Charles Olson and Frances Boldereff
Author Charles Olson
Publisher Wesleyan University Press
Release Date 1999-08-20
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 552
ISBN 0819563641
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A remarkable series of letters between Black Mountain poet Charles Olson and his most ardent reader.

A Charles Olson Reader by Charles Olson

Title A Charles Olson Reader
Author Charles Olson
Publisher Carcanet Press
Release Date 2005
Category
Total Pages 217
ISBN UCSC:32106018146073
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Charles Olson (1910-70) believed that poetry exists in an 'open field' through which the poet transmits energy to the receptive reader. Olson's influence on the development of British and American poetry through his writing and teaching is immense. His work encompasses myth, history, scholarship and politics, grand theories and delight in the particular variousness of life, all marked by the curiosity and openness to experience that he asked of his readers. Olson grew up and returned to live in the seafaring town of Gloucester, Massachusetts, and it was from the life and language of its citizens that his poetry drew its strengths. The Reader includes extracts from the full range of Olson's poetry and prose, including letters, interviews and the full text of the key essay 'Projective Verse'. Ralph Maud, a colleague of Olson's from 1963-5 and the editor of Olson's letters, has supplied an introduction, supporting illustrations, notes and bibliography ..

What Does Not Change by Ralph Maud

Title What Does Not Change
Author Ralph Maud
Publisher Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
Release Date 1998
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 176
ISBN 0838637310
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The author demonstrates that "The Kingfishers," as Olson's first long poem, is so crucial to understanding his development that a study of it (along with "The Praises," cut from the same cloth) takes one into every aspect of Olson's early life and thought. Insight into Olson's apprenticeship and purposes has been somewhat blurred because "The Kingfishers" has not been entirely understood.

Title A Literary Biography of Robin Blaser
Author Miriam Nichols
Publisher Springer Nature
Release Date 2019-09-06
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9783030183271
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A Literary Biography of Robin Blaser: Mechanic of Splendor is the first major study illustrating Robin Blaser’s significance to North American poetry. The poet Robin Blaser (1925–2009) was an important participant in the Berkeley Renaissance of the 1950s and San Francisco poetry circles of the 1960s. The book illuminates Blaser’s distinctive responses to and relationships with familiar writers including Robert Duncan, Jack Spicer, and Charles Olson via their correspondence. Blaser contributed to the formation of the serial poem as a dominant mode in post-war New American poetry through his work and engagement with the poetry communities of the time. Offering a new perspective on a well-known and influential period in American poetry, Miriam Nichols combines the story of Blaser’s life—coming from a mid-western conservative religious upbringing and his coming of age as a gay man in Berkeley, Boston, and San Francisco—with critical assessments of his major poems through unprecedented archival research. This literary biography presents Blaser’s poetry and poetics in the many contexts from which it came, ranging from the Berkeley Renaissance to the Vancouver scene; from surrealism to phenomenology; from the New American poetry to the Canadian postmodern; from the homoerotic to high theory. Throughout, Blaser’s voice is heard in the excitement of his early years in Berkeley and Boston and the seriousness of the later years where he was doing most of his living in his work.

Radical Affections by Miriam Nichols

Title Radical Affections
Author Miriam Nichols
Publisher University of Alabama Press
Release Date 2010
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 355
ISBN 9780817356217
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Offers a critical study of six poets central to the New American poetry movement, including Charles Olsen, Robert Creely, Robert Duncan, Jack Spicer, Robin Blaser and Susan Howe. Simultaneous.

Writing In Our Time by Pauline Butling

Title Writing in Our Time
Author Pauline Butling
Publisher Wilfrid Laurier Univ. Press
Release Date 2009-10-22
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780889205277
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Process poetics is about radical poetry — poetry that challenges dominant world views, values, and aesthetic practices with its use of unconventional punctuation, interrupted syntax, variable subject positions, repetition, fragmentation, and disjunction. To trace the aesthetically and politically radical poetries in English Canada since the 1960s, Pauline Butling and Susan Rudy begin with the “upstart” poets published in Vancouver’s TISH: A Poetry Newsletter, and follow the trajectory of process poetics in its national and international manifestations through the 1980s and ’90s. The poetics explored include the works of Nicole Brossard, Daphne Martlatt, bpNichol, George Bowering, Roy Kiyooka, and Frank Davey in the 1960s and ’70s. For the 1980-2000 period, the authors include essays on Jeff Derksen, Clare Harris, Erin Mour, and Lisa Robertson. They also look at books by older authors published after 1979, including Robin Blaser, Robert Kroetsch, and Fred Wah. A historiography of the radical poets, and a roster of the little magazines, small press publishers, literary festivals, and other such sites that have sustained poetic experimentation, provide context.

The Whole Song by Vincent Ferrini

Title The Whole Song
Author Vincent Ferrini
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 2010-10-01
Category Poetry
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9780252091193
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

With a voice emerging from class tensions, labor struggles, the Great Depression, and World War II, Vincent Ferrini lived as a people's poet crying out for an end to exploitation and organized greed. Radical Christian gnosis and the conviction that poetry should be more than a display of word-craft distinguished him from poets like T. S. Eliot, infusing his work with dynamic images of Christ as a fighter, a revolutionary, and a martyr in opposing the mighty for the sake of the poor.

Facing The Abyss by George Hutchinson

Title Facing the Abyss
Author George Hutchinson
Publisher Columbia University Press
Release Date 2018-01-23
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 439
ISBN 9780231545969
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Mythologized as the era of the “good war” and the “Greatest Generation,” the 1940s are frequently understood as a more heroic, uncomplicated time in American history. Yet just below the surface, a sense of dread, alienation, and the haunting specter of radical evil permeated American art and literature. Writers returned home from World War II and gave form to their disorienting experiences of violence and cruelty. They probed the darkness that the war opened up and confronted bigotry, existential guilt, ecological concerns, and fear about the nature and survival of the human race. In Facing the Abyss, George Hutchinson offers readings of individual works and the larger intellectual and cultural scene to reveal the 1940s as a period of profound and influential accomplishment. Facing the Abyss examines the relation of aesthetics to politics, the idea of universalism, and the connections among authors across racial, ethnic, and gender divisions. Modernist and avant-garde styles were absorbed into popular culture as writers and artists turned away from social realism to emphasize the process of artistic creation. Hutchinson explores a range of important writers, from Saul Bellow and Mary McCarthy to Richard Wright and James Baldwin. African American and Jewish novelists critiqued racism and anti-Semitism, women writers pushed back on the misogyny unleashed during the war, and authors such as Gore Vidal and Tennessee Williams reflected a new openness in the depiction of homosexuality. The decade also witnessed an awakening of American environmental and ecological consciousness. Hutchinson argues that despite the individualized experiences depicted in these works, a common belief in art’s ability to communicate the universal in particulars united the most important works of literature and art during the 1940s. Hutchinson’s capacious view of American literary and cultural history masterfully weaves together a wide range of creative and intellectual expression into a sweeping new narrative of this pivotal decade.

Imperfect Fit by Allen Fisher

Title Imperfect Fit
Author Allen Fisher
Publisher University of Alabama Press
Release Date 2016-11-15
Category Art
Total Pages 300
ISBN 9780817358723
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Imperfect Fit is a dynamic study of the relationships between modern art and avant-garde poetry from the 1950s to the present that provides fascinating glimpses into both Allen Fisher s remarkable work as a poet, painter, and critic, as well as the state of avant-garde aesthetics as a whole."

The New American Poetry by John R. Woznicki

Title The New American Poetry
Author John R. Woznicki
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield
Release Date 2013-12-24
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 300
ISBN 9781611461251
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book hews a new pathway of literary criticism on The New American Poetry that goes beyond the typical analysis of the anthology’s construction and reception. It expresses new ideas about the anthology’s influence on an extensive variety of people, poetics, and culture over the past fifty years, broadening the scope of what has formerly been considered regarding the anthology’s authority.

Title Phenomenology and the Late Twentieth Century American Long Poem
Author Matthew Carbery
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2019-01-04
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 235
ISBN 9783030050023
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Phenomenology and the Late Twentieth-Century American Long Poem reads major figures including Charles Olson, Lyn Hejinian, Nathaniel Mackey, Susan Howe and Rachel Blau DuPlessis within a new approach to the long poem tradition. Through a series of contextualised close readings, it explores the ways in which American poets developed their poetic forms by engaging with a variety of European phenomenologists, including Hannah Arendt, Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Martin Heidegger, Emmanuel Levinas and Jacques Derrida. Consolidating recent materials on the role of Continental Philosophy in American poetics, this book explores the theoretical and historical contexts in which avant-garde poets have developed radically new methods of making poems long. Matthew Carbery offers a timely commentary on a number of major works of American poetry whilst providing ground-breaking research into the wider philosophical context of late twentieth-century poetic experimentation.

Late Modernist Poetics by Anthony Mellors

Title Late Modernist Poetics
Author Anthony Mellors
Publisher Manchester University Press
Release Date 2005-05-06
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 230
ISBN 0719058856
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book explores the uncanny afterlife of modernist ideals in the second half of the twentieth century. Rejecting the familiar notion that modernism dissolved during the 1930s, it argues that the fusion of rationalism and mysticism which characterizes modernist poetics was sustained long after its politics had been discredited by the events of World War Two. This wide-ranging contextual study focuses on the poetry of Ezra Pound, Charles Olson, Paul Celan, and J H Prynne.

Fieldworks by Lytle Shaw

Title Fieldworks
Author Lytle Shaw
Publisher University of Alabama Press
Release Date 2013-01-22
Category Art
Total Pages 379
ISBN 9780817357320
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Fieldworks offers a historical account of the social, rhetorical, and material attempts to ground art and poetry in the physicality of a site. Arguing that place-oriented inquiries allowed poets and artists to develop new, experimental models of historiography and ethnography, Lytle Shaw draws out the shifting terms of this practice from World War II to the present through a series of illuminating case studies. Beginning with the alternate national genealogies unearthed by William Carlos Williams in Paterson and Charles Olson in Gloucester, Shaw demonstrates how subsequent poets sought to ground such inquiries in concrete social formations—to in effect live the poetics of place: Gary Snyder in his back-to-the-land familial compound, Kitkitdizze; Amiri Baraka in a black nationalist community in Newark; Robert Creeley and the poets of Bolinas, California, in the capacious “now” of their poet-run town. Turning to the work of Robert Smithson—who called one of his essays an “appendix to Paterson,” and who in turn has exerted a major influence on poets since the 1970s—Shaw then traces the emergence of site-specific art in relation both to the poetics of place and to the larger linguistic turn in the humanities, considering poets including Clark Coolidge, Bernadette Mayer, and Lisa Robertson. By putting the poetics of place into dialog with site-specificity in art, Shaw demonstrates how poets and artists became experimental explicators not just of concrete locations and their histories, but of the discourses used to interpret sites more broadly. It is this dual sense of fieldwork that organizes Shaw’s groundbreaking history of site-specific poetry.

Stratified Modernism by Sasha Colby

Title Stratified Modernism
Author Sasha Colby
Publisher Peter Lang
Release Date 2009
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 212
ISBN 303911932X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book proposes an alternative modernist tradition, a line of writers captured by the archaeological project and the poetic possibilities it created. This tradition spans from Théophile Gautier's mid-nineteenth-century passion for Egyptology to Charles Olson's literal excavations on the Yucatan peninsula in the 1950s. With attention to the historical development of archaeology, the author argues that the archaeological became a rich site of cultural fantasy, a location where modernity's alternatives could be considered, imagined, and transcribed. These models, taking their cue from new archaeological dynamics, include the ushering of primal intensities into the present, the tapping of the subterranean unconscious, and the decipherment of an original poetic language. Ranging from psychic excavations to the reactivation of political templates, the plumbing of the archaeological landscape became a key posture in modernist development, which the author pursues through the work of both twentieth-century modernists and their nineteenth-century substrata. Ambitious in scope, this book provides a compelling argument about the role of archaeology in the modernist literary imagination and the century-long evolution of the poetics of excavation.

Collected Prose by Charles Olson

Title Collected Prose
Author Charles Olson
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 1997-12-19
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 382
ISBN 0520919025
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The prose writings of Charles Olson (1910–1970) have had a far-reaching and continuing impact on post-World War II American poetics. Olson's theories, which made explicit the principles of his own poetics and those of the Black Mountain poets, were instrumental in defining the sense of the postmodern in poetry and form the basis of most postwar free verse. The Collected Prose brings together in one volume the works published for the most part between 1946 and 1969, many of which are now out of print. A valuable companion to editions of Olson's poetry, the book backgrounds the poetics, preoccupations, and fascinations that underpin his great poems. Included are Call Me Ishmael, a classic of American literary criticism; the influential essays "Projective Verse" and "Human Universe"; and essays, book reviews, and Olson's notes on his studies. In these pieces one can trace the development of his new science of man, called "muthologos," a radical mix of myth and phenomenology that Olson offered in opposition to the mechanistic discourse and rationalizing policy he associated with America's recent wars in Europe and Asia. Editors Donald Allen and Benjamin Friedlander offer helpful annotations throughout, and poet Robert Creeley, who enjoyed a long and mutually influential relationship with Olson, provides the book's introduction.