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Title Medieval Afterlives in Contemporary Culture
Author Gail Ashton
Publisher Bloomsbury Publishing
Release Date 2015-03-12
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9781441102829
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

With contributions from 29 leading international scholars, this is the first single-volume guide to the appropriation of medieval texts in contemporary culture. Medieval Afterlives in Contemporary Culture covers a comprehensive range of media, including literature, film, TV, comics book adaptations, electronic media, performances, and commercial merchandise and tourism. Its lively chapters range from Spamalot to the RSC, Beowulf to Merlin, computer games to internet memes, opera to Young Adult fiction and contemporary poetry, and much more. Also included is a companion website aimed at general readers, academics, and students interested in the burgeoning field of Medieval afterlives, complete with: - Further reading/weblinks - 'My favourite' guides to contemporary medieval appropriations - Images and interviews - Guide to library archives and manuscript collections - Guide to heritage collection See also our website at https://medievalafterlives.wordpress.com/.

Title Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture
Author Gail Ashton
Publisher Palgrave Macmillan
Release Date 2012-12-11
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 258
ISBN 0230337341
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Drawing from an eclectic mix of scholars from the US, UK, and Australia, Medieval Afterlives in Popular Culture examines the persistence of medieval themes, characters, and situations in a variety of media from reality television to Virginia Woolf, Arthurian film to Disney animation, Shrek to historical fantasy. Each essay demonstrates that the Middle Ages are not relegated to a static past but continue to fashion a vital presence in contemporary popular culture, changing our assumptions about the flow of history and the creation of the present.

Experiencing The Afterlife by Manuele Gragnolati

Title Experiencing the Afterlife
Author Manuele Gragnolati
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2005
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 279
ISBN 0268029644
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Experiencing the Afterlife provides the first sustained analysis of popular, vernacular depictions of the afterlife written in Italy before the Divine Comedy by authors such as Uguccione da Lodi, Giacomino da Verona, and Bonvesin da la Riva. Manuele Gragnolati uses his readings of these poets to provide a new interpretation of Dante's work. Combining elements from several disciplines, he investigates the richness of high medieval eschatology and the concept of personal identity it expresses. Gragnolati is particularly concerned with how the notions of body and pain characteristic of medieval spirituality and devotion inform the eschatological representations of the time, especially in their paradoxical urge to stress at once the physical experience of the separated soul and the final necessity of bodily resurrection. By integrating lesser-known texts and scholarship from other disciplines into the specialized field of Dante studies, Gragnolati sheds new light on some of the most vigorously debated and crucial questions raised by the Divine Comedy, including the embryological discourse of Purgatorio 25, the relation between the soul's experience of pain in Purgatory and the devotion that late medieval culture expressed toward Christ's suffering, and the significance of the audacious vision of resurrected bodies that Dante the pilgrim enjoys at the end of his journey. At the same time, Gragnolati brings these questions back into contemporary discussions of medieval eschatology and opens new perspectives for current and future work on embodiment and identity. Scholars and students of Dante and Italian studies, as well as those in medieval history, religion, culture, and art history, will be rewarded by the fresh insights contained in Experiencing the Afterlife.

Title From Medievalism to Early Modernism
Author Marina Gerzic
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2018-10-26
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 268
ISBN 9780429683008
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From Medievalism to Early-Modernism: Adapting the English Past is a collection of essays that both analyses the historical and cultural medieval and early modern past, and engages with the medievalism and early-modernism—a new term introduced in this collection—present in contemporary popular culture. By focusing on often overlooked uses of the past in contemporary culture—such as the allusions to John Webster’s The Duchess of Malfi (1623) in J.K. Rowling’s Harry Potter books, and the impact of intertextual references and internet fandom on the BBC’s The Hollow Crown: The Wars of the Roses—the contributors illustrate how cinematic, televisual, artistic, and literary depictions of the historical and cultural past not only re-purpose the past in varying ways, but also build on a history of adaptations that audiences have come to know and expect. From Medievalism to Early-Modernism: Adapting the English Past analyses the way that the medieval and early modern periods are used in modern adaptations, and how these adaptations both reflect contemporary concerns, and engage with a history of intertextuality and intervisuality.

Title Medieval English Romance in Context
Author Gail Ashton
Publisher A&C Black
Release Date 2010-04-15
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 163
ISBN 9781847062505
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Structured in three parts, this book focuses on immediate contexts, key texts, and wider contexts enabling development from background issues through the actual literary texts to criticism and afterlives.

The Medieval Manuscript Book by Michael Johnston

Title The Medieval Manuscript Book
Author Michael Johnston
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2015-08-31
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781107066199
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Situates the medieval manuscript within its cultural contexts, with chapters by experts in bibliographical and theoretical approaches to manuscript study.

Title Fantasy and Science Fiction Medievalisms From Isaac Asimov to A Game of Thrones
Author Helen Young
Publisher Cambria Press
Release Date 2015-06-08
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 240
ISBN 9781621967477
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

rom advertisements to amusement parks, themed restaurants, and Renaissance fairs twenty-first century popular culture is strewn with reimaginings of the Middle Ages. They are nowhere more prevalent, however, than in the films, television series, books, and video games of speculative genres: fantasy and science fiction. Peter Jackson's The Lord of the Rings and The Hobbit film trilogies and George R. R. Martin's multimedia Game of Thrones franchise are just two of the most widely known and successful fantasy conglomerates of recent decades. Medievalism has often been understood as a defining feature of fantasy, and as the antithesis of science fiction, but such constructs vastly underestimate the complexities of both genres and their interactions. "Medieval" has multiple meanings in fantasy and science fiction, which shift with genre convention, and which bring about their own changes as authors and audiences engage with what has gone before in the recent and deeper pasts. Earlier volumes have examined some of the ways in which contemporary popular culture re-imagines the Middle Ages, offering broad overviews, but none considers fantasy, science fiction, or the two together. The focused approach of this collection provides a directed pathway into the myriad medievalisms of modern popular culture. By engaging directly with genre(s), this book acknowledges that medievalist creative texts and practices do not occur in a vacuum, but are shaped by multiple cultural forces and concerns; medievalism is never just about the Middle Ages.

Title The Cambridge Companion to Medievalism
Author Louise D'Arcens
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2016-02-29
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781107086715
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An introduction to medievalism offering a balance of accessibility and sophistication, with comprehensive overviews as well as detailed case studies.

Title The Arma Christi in Medieval and Early Modern Material Culture
Author Professor Andrea Denny-Brown
Publisher Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Release Date 2014-01-24
Category History
Total Pages 448
ISBN 1409456765
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book explores the multiple resonances and representations of the arma Christi, the ‘instruments of the Passion,’ in medieval and early modern culture. From the weapons used to torment and sacrifice the body of Christ sprang a reliquary tradition that produced active and contemplative devotional practices, complex literary narratives, intense lyric poems, striking visual images, and innovative architecture. The verbal and visual representations that accrued from these holiest of relics, and the practices they in turn inspired, are relevant to a wide variety of critical fields and theoretical approaches. This collection capitalizes on recent work on these most central of medieval ‘objects,’ and produces, through its interdisciplinary and intergenerational scholarly collaboration, a fresh view of the multiple intersections of the spiritual and the material in the Middle Ages. It also includes a new edition of the English arma Christi poem known as ‘O Vernicle’ from previously unpublished manuscripts.

Title Medievalism and Modernity
Author Karl Fugelso
Publisher Boydell & Brewer
Release Date 2016
Category HISTORY
Total Pages 218
ISBN 9781843844372
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Essays examining the complex intertwining and effect of medievalism on modernity - and vice versa.

Title Beowulf s Popular Afterlife in Literature Comic Books and Film
Author Kathleen Forni
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2018-06-12
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780429880360
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Beowulf's presence on the popular cultural radar has increased in the past two decades, coincident with cultural crisis and change. Why? By way of a fusion of cultural studies, adaptation theory, and monster theory, Beowulf's Popular Afterlife examines a wide range of Anglo-American retellings and appropriations found in literary texts, comic books, and film. The most remarkable feature of popular adaptations of the poem is that its monsters, frequently victims of organized militarism, male aggression, or social injustice, are provided with strong motives for their retaliatory brutality. Popular adaptations invert the heroic ideology of the poem, and monsters are not only created by powerful men but are projections of their own pathological behavior. At the same time there is no question that the monsters created by human malfeasance must be eradicated.

Title Death in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Times
Author Albrecht Classen
Publisher Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release Date 2016-04-11
Category Social Science
Total Pages 551
ISBN 9783110434873
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Death is not only the final moment of life, it also casts a huge shadow on human society at large. People throughout time have had to cope with death as an existential experience, and this also, of course, in the premodern world. The contributors to the present volume examine the material and spiritual conditions of the culture of death, studying specific buildings and spaces, literary works and art objects, theatrical performances, and medical tracts from the early Middle Ages to the late eighteenth century. Death has always evoked fear, terror, and awe, it has puzzled and troubled people, forcing theologians and philosophers to respond and provide answers for questions that seem to evade real explanations. The more we learn about the culture of death, the more we can comprehend the culture of life. As this volume demonstrates, the approaches to death varied widely, also in the Middle Ages and the early modern age. This volume hence adds a significant number of new facets to the critical examination of this ever-present phenomenon of death, exploring poetic responses to the Black Death, types of execution of a female murderess, death as the springboard for major political changes, and death reflected in morality plays and art.

Title Memorializing the Middle Classes in Medieval and Renaissance Europe
Author Anne Leader
Publisher Walter de Gruyter GmbH & Co KG
Release Date 2018-12-17
Category Social Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9783110625424
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Offering a broad overview of memorialization practices across Europe and the Mediterranean, this book examines local customs through particular case studies. These essays explore complementary themes through the lens of commemorative art, including social status; personal and corporate identities; the intersections of mercantile, intellectual, and religious attitudes; upward (and downward) mobility; and the cross-cultural exchange.

Title Harnessing the Power of the Criminal Corpse
Author Sarah Tarlow
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2018-05-17
Category History
Total Pages 273
ISBN 9783319779089
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This open access book is the culmination of many years of research on what happened to the bodies of executed criminals in the past. Focusing on the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, it looks at the consequences of the 1752 Murder Act. These criminal bodies had a crucial role in the history of medicine, and the history of crime, and great symbolic resonance in literature and popular culture. Starting with a consideration of the criminal corpse in the medieval and early modern periods, chapters go on to review the histories of criminal justice, of medical history and of gibbeting under the Murder Act, and ends with some discussion of the afterlives of the corpse, in literature, folklore and in contemporary medical ethics. Using sophisticated insights from cultural history, archaeology, literature, philosophy and ethics as well as medical and crime history, this book is a uniquely interdisciplinary take on a fascinating historical phenomenon.

The Lives And Afterlives Of Medieval Iconography by Art History Specialist at the Index of Medieval Art Henry D Schilb

Title The Lives and Afterlives of Medieval Iconography
Author Art History Specialist at the Index of Medieval Art Henry D Schilb
Publisher Penn State University Press
Release Date 2020-12-22
Category
Total Pages 232
ISBN 0271086211
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

What does the study of iconography entail for scholars active today? How does it intersect with the broad array of methodological and theoretical approaches now at the disposal of art historians? Should we still dare to use the term "iconography" to describe such work? The seven essays collected here argue that we should. Their authors set out to evaluate the continuing relevance of iconographic studies to current art-historical scholarship by exploring the fluidity of iconography itself over broad spans of time, place, and culture. These wide-ranging case studies take a diversity of approaches as they track the transformation of medieval images and their meanings along their respective paths, exploring how medieval iconographies remained stable or changed; how images were reconceived in response to new contexts, ideas, or viewerships; and how modern thinking about medieval images--including the application or rejection of traditional methodologies--has shaped our understanding of what they signify. These essays demonstrate that iconographic work still holds a critical place within the rapidly evolving discipline of art history as well as within the many other disciplines that increasingly prioritize the study of images. This inaugural volume in the series Signa: Papers of the Index of Medieval Art at Princeton University demonstrates the importance of keeping matters of image and meaning--regardless of whether we use the word "iconography"--at the center of modern inquiry into medieval visual literature. In addition to the editors, the contributors to this volume are Kirk Ambrose, Charles Barber, Catherine Fernandez, Elina Gertsman, Jacqueline E. Jung, Dale Kinney, and D. Fairchild Ruggles.

Title Red Legacies in China
Author Jie Li
Publisher BRILL
Release Date 2020-10-26
Category History
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781684171170
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

What has contemporary China inherited from its revolutionary past? How do the realities and memories, aesthetics and practices of the Mao era still reverberate in the post-Mao cultural landscape? The essays in this volume propose “red legacies” as a new critical framework from which to examine the profusion of cultural productions and afterlives of the communist revolution in order to understand China’s continuities and transformations from socialism to postsocialism. Organized into five parts—red foundations, red icons, red classics, red bodies, and red shadows—the book’s interdisciplinary contributions focus on visual and performing arts, literature and film, language and thought, architecture, museums, and memorials. Mediating at once unfulfilled ideals and unmourned ghosts across generations, red cultural legacies suggest both inheritance and debt, and can be mobilized to support as well as to critique the status quo.

Title Death Mourning and the Afterlife in Korea
Author Charlotte Horlyck
Publisher University of Hawaii Press
Release Date 2018-02-28
Category History
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9780824876760
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Death and the activities and beliefs surrounding it can teach us much about the ideals and cultures of the living. While biologically death is an end to physical life, this break is not quite so apparent in its mental and spiritual aspects. Indeed, the influence of the dead over the living is sometimes much greater than before death. This volume takes a multidisciplinary approach in an effort to provide a fuller understanding of both historic and contemporary practices linked with death in Korea. Contributors from Korea and the West incorporate the approaches of archaeology, history, literature, religion, and anthropology in addressing a number of topics organized around issues of the body, disposal of remains, ancestor worship and rites, and the afterlife. The first two chapters explore the ways in which bodies of the dying and the dead were dealt with from the Greater Silla Kingdom (668–935) to the mid-twentieth century. Grave construction and goods, cemeteries, and memorial monuments in the Koryŏ (918–1392) and the twentieth century are then discussed, followed by a consideration of ancestral rites and worship, which have formed an inseparable part of Korean mortuary customs since premodern times. Chapters address the need to appease the dead both in shamanic and Confucians contexts. The final section of the book examines the treatment of the dead and how the state of death has been perceived. Ghost stories provide important insight into how death was interpreted by common people in the Koryŏ and Chosŏn (1392–1910) while nonconformist narratives of death such as the seventeenth-century romantic novel Kuunmong point to a clear conflict between Buddhist thought and practice and official Neo-Confucian doctrine. Keeping with unendorsed views on death, the final chapter explores how death and the afterlife were understood by early Korean Catholics of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Death, Mourning, and the Afterlife in Korea fills a significant gap in studies on Korean society and culture as well as on East Asian mortuary practices. By approaching its topic from a variety of disciplines and extending its historical reach to cover both premodern and modern Korea, it is an important resource for scholars and students in a variety of fields.

Creating Material Worlds by Louisa Campbell

Title Creating Material Worlds
Author Louisa Campbell
Publisher Oxbow Books
Release Date 2016-05-07
Category Social Science
Total Pages 192
ISBN 9781785701818
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Despite a growing literature on identity theory in the last two decades, much of its current use in archaeology is still driven toward locating and dating static categories such as ‘Phoenician’, ‘Christian’ or ‘native’. Previous studies have highlighted the various problems and challenges presented by identity, with the overall effect of deconstructing it to insignificance. As the humanities and social sciences turn to material culture, archaeology provides a unique perspective on the interaction between people and things over the long term. This volume argues that identity is worth studying not despite its slippery nature, but because of it. Identity can be seen as an emergent property of living in a material world, an ongoing process of becoming which archaeologists are particularly well suited to study. The geographic and temporal scale of the papers included is purposefully broad to demonstrate the variety of ways in which archaeology is redefining identity. Research areas span from the Great Lakes to the Mediterranean, with case studies from the Mesolithic to the contemporary world by emerging voices in the field. The volume contains a critical review of theories of identity by the editors, as well as a response and afterward by A. Bernard Knapp.

Otherworld Journeys by Carol Zaleski

Title Otherworld Journeys
Author Carol Zaleski
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 1988-11-03
Category Social Science
Total Pages 275
ISBN 0195363523
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Dozens of books, articles, television shows, and films relating "near-death" experiences have appeared in the past decade. People who have survived a close brush with death reveal their extraordinary visions and ecstatic feelings at the moment they died, describing journeys through a tunnel to a realm of light, visual reviews of their past deeds, encounters with a benevolent spirit, and permanent transformation after returning to life. Carol Zaleski's Otherworld Journeys offers the most comprehensive treatment to date of the evidence surrounding near-death experiences. The first to place researchers' findings, first-person accounts, and possible medical or psychological explanations in historical perspective, she discusses how these materials reflect the influence of contemporary culture. She demonstrates that modern near-death reports belong to a vast family of otherworld journey tales, with examples in nearly every religious heritage. She identifies universal as well as culturally specific features by comparing near-death narratives in two distinct periods of Western society: medieval Christendom and twentieth-century secular America. This comparison reveals profound similarities, such as the life-review and the transforming after-effects of the vision, as well as striking contrasts, such as the absence of hell or punishment scenes from modern accounts. Mediating between the "debunkers" and the near-death researchers, Zaleski considers current efforts to explain near-death experience scientifically. She concludes by emphasizing the importance of the otherworld vision for understanding imaginative and religious experience in general.

Title The Literary Afterlives of Roger Casement 1899 2016
Author Alison Garden
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2020-06-30
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9781789627619
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book explores the literary afterlives of Ireland's most enigmatic, shape-shifting and controversial son: Roger Casement. A seminal human rights activist, a key figure in the struggle for Irish independence, a traitor to British imperialism and an enthusiastic recorder of a sexual life lived in the shadows, Casement has offered writers a symbol of ambivalence and multiplicity. Casement can be found in the most curious of places: from the imperial horrors of Heart of Darkness (1899) to the gay club culture of 1980s London in Alan Hollinghurst's The Swimming-Pool Library (1998); from George Bernard Shaw's play Saint Joan (1923) to a love affair between spies in Elizabeth Bowen's The Heat of the Day (1948); from the post-Easter Rising elegies of Eva Gore-Booth and Alice Milligan to the beguiling, opaque poetry of Medbh McGuckian. Drawing upon a variety of literary and cultural texts, alongside significant archival research, this book establishes dialogues between modernist and contemporary works to argue that Casement's ghost animates issues of historical pertinence and pressing contemporary relevance. It positions Casement as a vital and fascinating figure in the compromised and contradictory terrain of Anglo-Irish history.