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Medicine Before The Plague by Michael R. McVaugh

Title Medicine Before the Plague
Author Michael R. McVaugh
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2002-07-11
Category History
Total Pages 300
ISBN 0521524547
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An account of the medical world in eastern Spain in the decades before the Black Death.

Title Medieval Medicine and the Plague
Author Lynne Elliott
Publisher Crabtree Publishing Company
Release Date 2006
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 32
ISBN 077871358X
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Illustrates how death and incurable disease were considered a common part of medieval life and offers a history of the Black Death, or the plague, which killed millions of people in Europe.

Title Plague SARS and the Story of Medicine in Hong Kong
Author
Publisher Hong Kong University Press
Release Date 2006-01-01
Category Medical
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9622098053
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"The volume covers Hong Kong's medical development in the period from 1841 to early 2005, including the history of hospitals and medical education, and the role of the Bacteriological Institute. It is a record of how the health care system has evolved and how the territory has been able to cope with the massive increase in population."--BOOK JACKET.

Title Medicine and Magic in Elizabethan London
Author Lauren Kassell
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2007-02-01
Category History
Total Pages 281
ISBN 0199215278
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Simon Forman (1552-1611) is one of London's most infamous astrologers. He stood apart from the medical elite because he was not formally educated and because he represented, and boldly asserted, medical ideas that were antithetical to those held by most learned physicians. He survived the plague, was consulted thousands of times a year for medical and other questions, distilled strong waters made from beer, herbs, and sometimes chemical ingredients, pursued the philosopher's stonein experiments and ancient texts, and when he was fortunate spoke with angels. He wrote compulsively, documenting his life and protesting his expertise in thousands of pages of notes and treatises. This highly readable book provides the first full account of Forman's papers, makes sense of hisnotorious reputation, and vividly recovers the world of medicine and magic in Elizabethan London.

Title The Plague and Medicine in the Middle Ages
Author Fiona MacDonald
Publisher Gareth Stevens
Release Date 2005-07
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 48
ISBN 0836858980
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Describes the illnesses, plagues, diagnoses, and treatments during the Middle Ages.

Plague Hospitals by Jane L. Stevens Crawshaw

Title Plague Hospitals
Author Jane L. Stevens Crawshaw
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2016-04-22
Category Medical
Total Pages 338
ISBN 9781317080282
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Developed throughout early modern Europe, lazaretti, or plague hospitals, took on a central role in early modern responses to epidemic disease, in particular the prevention and treatment of plague. The lazaretti served as isolation hospitals, quarantine centres, convalescent homes, cemeteries, and depots for the disinfection or destruction of infected goods. The first permanent example of this institution was established in Venice in 1423 and between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries tens of thousands of patients passed through the doors. Founded on lagoon islands, the lazaretti tell us about the relationship between the city and its natural environment. The plague hospitals also illustrate the way in which medical structures in Venice intersected with those of piety and poor relief and provided a model for public health which was influential across Europe. This is the first detailed study of how these plague hospitals functioned, where they were situated, who worked there, what it was like to stay there, and how many people survived. Comparisons are made between the Venetian lazaretti and similar institutions in Padua, Verona and other Italian and European cities. Centred on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, during which time there were both serious plague outbreaks in Europe and periods of relative calm, the book explores what the lazaretti can tell us about early modern medicine and society and makes a significant contribution to both Venetian history and our understanding of public health in early modern Europe, engaging with ideas of infection and isolation, charity and cure, dirt, disease and death.

Cultures Of Plague by Cohn Jr.

Title Cultures of Plague
Author Cohn Jr.
Publisher OUP Oxford
Release Date 2011-03-31
Category History
Total Pages 356
ISBN 9780191615887
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Cultures of Plague opens a new chapter in the history of medicine. Neither the plague nor the ideas it stimulated were static, fixed in a timeless Galenic vacuum over five centuries, as historians and scientists commonly assume. As plague evolved in its pathology, modes of transmission, and the social characteristics of its victims, so too did medical thinking about plague develop. This study of plague imprints from academic medical treatises to plague poetry highlights the most feared and devastating epidemic of the sixteenth-century, one that threatened Italy top to toe from 1575 to 1578 and unleashed an avalanche of plague writing. From erudite definitions, remote causes, cures and recipes, physicians now directed their plague writings to the prince and discovered their most 'valiant remedies' in public health: strict segregation of the healthy and ill, cleaning streets and latrines, addressing the long-term causes of plague-poverty. Those outside the medical profession joined the chorus. In the heartland of Counter-Reformation Italy, physicians along with those outside the profession questioned the foundations of Galenic and Renaissance medicine, even the role of God. Assaults on medieval and Renaissance medicine did not need to await the Protestant-Paracelsian alliance of seventeenth-century in northern Europe. Instead, creative forces planted by the pandemic of 1575-8 sowed seeds of doubt and unveiled new concerns and ideas within that supposedly most conservative form of medical writing, the plague tract. Relying on health board statistics and dramatized with eyewitness descriptions of bizarre happenings, human misery, and suffering, these writers created the structure for plague classics of the eighteenth century, and by tracking the contagion's complex and crooked paths, they anticipated trends of nineteenth-century epidemiology.

Medicine Before Science by Roger French

Title Medicine Before Science
Author Roger French
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2003-02-20
Category History
Total Pages 289
ISBN 0521007615
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book offers an introduction to the history of university-trained physicians from the middle ages to the eighteenth-century Enlightenment. These were the elite, in reputation and rewards, and they were successful. Yet we can form little idea of their clinical effectiveness, and to modern eyes their theory and practice often seems bizarre. But the historical evidence is that they were judged on other criteria, and the argument of this book is that these physicians helped to construct the expectations of society--and met them accordingly.

Epidemics And Society by Frank M. Snowden

Title Epidemics and Society
Author Frank M. Snowden
Publisher Yale University Press
Release Date 2019-10-22
Category Medical
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9780300249149
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A “brilliant and sobering” (Paul Kennedy, Wall Street Journal) look at the history and human costs of pandemic outbreaks The World Economic Forum #1 book to read for context on the coronavirus outbreak This sweeping exploration of the impact of epidemic diseases looks at how mass infectious outbreaks have shaped society, from the Black Death to today. In a clear and accessible style, Frank M. Snowden reveals the ways that diseases have not only influenced medical science and public health, but also transformed the arts, religion, intellectual history, and warfare. A multidisciplinary and comparative investigation of the medical and social history of the major epidemics, this volume touches on themes such as the evolution of medical therapy, plague literature, poverty, the environment, and mass hysteria. In addition to providing historical perspective on diseases such as smallpox, cholera, and tuberculosis, Snowden examines the fallout from recent epidemics such as HIV/AIDS, SARS, and Ebola and the question of the world’s preparedness for the next generation of diseases.

The Last Plague by Mark Osborne Humphries

Title The Last Plague
Author Mark Osborne Humphries
Publisher University of Toronto Press
Release Date 2013-01-11
Category History
Total Pages 348
ISBN 9781442698284
LanguageEnglish, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The ‘Spanish’ influenza of 1918 was the deadliest pandemic in history, killing as many as 50 million people worldwide. Canadian federal public health officials tried to prevent the disease from entering the country by implementing a maritime quarantine, as had been their standard practice since the cholera epidemics of 1832. But the 1918 flu was a different type of disease. In spite of the best efforts of both federal and local officials, up to fifty thousand Canadians died. In The Last Plague, Mark Osborne Humphries examines how federal epidemic disease management strategies developed before the First World War, arguing that the deadliest epidemic in Canadian history ultimately challenged traditional ideas about disease and public health governance. Using federal, provincial, and municipal archival sources, newspapers, and newly discovered military records – as well as original epidemiological studies – Humphries' sweeping national study situates the flu within a larger social, political, and military context for the first time. His provocative conclusion is that the 1918 flu crisis had important long-term consequences at the national level, ushering in the ‘modern’ era of public health in Canada.