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Title James Henry Hammond and the Old South
Author Drew Gilpin Faust
Publisher LSU Press
Release Date 1985-07-01
Category History
Total Pages 432
ISBN 9780807152485
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From his birth in 1807 to his death in 1864 as Sherman's troops marched in triumph toward South Carolina, James Henry Hammond witnessed the rise and fall of the cotton kingdom of the Old South. Planter, politician, and partisan of slavery, Hammond built a career for himself that in its breadth and ambition provides a composite portrait of the civilization in which he flourished. A long-awaited biography, Drew Gilpin Faust's James Henry Hammond and the Old South reveals the South Carolina planter who was at once characteristic of his age and unique among men of his time. Of humble origins, Hammond set out to conquer his society, to make himself a leader and a spokesman for the Old South. Through marriage he acquired a large plantation and many slaves, and then through shrewd management and progressive farming techniques he soon became one of the wealthiest men in South Carolina. He was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served as governor of his state. A scandal over his personal life forced him to retreat for many years to his plantation, but eventually he returned to public view, winning a seat in the United States Senate that he resigned when South Carolina seceded from the Union. James Henry Hammond's ambition was unquenchable. It consumed his life, directed almost his every move, and ultimately, in its titanic calculation and rigidity, destroyed the man confined within it. Like Faulkner's Thomas Sutpen, Faust suggests, Hammond had a "design," a compulsion to direct every moment of his life toward self-aggrandizement and legitimation. Hammond envisioned himself as the benevolent, paternal, but absolute master of his family and his slaves. But in reality, neither his family, his slaves, nor even his own behavior was completely under his command. Hammond ardently wished to perfect and preserve the southern way of life. But these goals were also beyond his control. At the time of his death it had become clear to him that his world, the world of the Old South, had ended.

Secret And Sacred by James Henry Hammond

Title Secret and Sacred
Author James Henry Hammond
Publisher Reaktion Books
Release Date 1997
Category History
Total Pages 342
ISBN 157003222X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The thoughts, triumphs, travails, and, at times, despicable actions of a leading antebellum politician.

Title Senators of the United States
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1995
Category Legislators
Total Pages 356
ISBN UOM:39015061597236
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title Congressional Serial Set
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1996
Category United States
Total Pages 86
ISBN OSU:32437010621833
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A Sacred Circle by Drew Gilpin Faust

Title A Sacred Circle
Author Drew Gilpin Faust
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1977
Category Intellectuals
Total Pages 189
ISBN UOM:39015000112592
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

How The South Won The Civil War by Heather Cox Richardson

Title How the South Won the Civil War
Author Heather Cox Richardson
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 2020
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780190900908
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"While in the short term--militarily--the North won the Civil War, in the long term--ideologically--victory went to the South. The continual expansion of the Western frontier allowed a Southern oligarchic ideology to find a new home and take root. Even with the abolition of slavery and the equalizing power of the 13th, 14th, and 15th Amendments, and the ostensible equalizing of economic opportunity afforded by Western expansion, anti-democratic practices were deeply embedded in the country's foundations, in which the rhetoric of equality struggled against the power of money. As the settlers from the East pushed into the West, so too did all of its hierarchies, reinforced by the seizure of Mexican lands at the end of the Mexican-American War and violence toward Native Americans. Both the South and the West depended on extractive industries--cotton in the former and mining and oil in the latter--giving rise to the creation of a white business elite"--

The Ideology Of Slavery by Drew Gilpin Faust

Title The Ideology of Slavery
Author Drew Gilpin Faust
Publisher LSU Press
Release Date 1981-09-01
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780807153963
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In one volume, these essentially unabridged selections from the works of the proslavery apologists are now conveniently accessible to scholars and students of the antebellum South. The Ideology of Slavery includes excerpts by Thomas R. Dew, founder of a new phase of proslavery militancy; William Harper and James Henry Hammond, representatives of the proslavery mainstream; Thornton Stringfellow, the most prominent biblical defender of the peculiar institution; Henry Hughes and Josiah Nott, who brought would-be scientism to the argument; and George Fitzhugh, the most extreme of proslavery writers. The works in this collection portray the development, mature essence, and ultimate fragmentation of the proslavery argument during the era of its greatest importance in the American South. Drew Faust provides a short introduction to each selection, giving information about the author and an account of the origin and publication of the document itself. Faust's introduction to the anthology traces the early historical treatment of proslavery thought and examines the recent resurgence of interest in the ideology of the Old South as a crucial component of powerful relations within that society. She notes the intensification of the proslavery argument between 1830 and 1860, when southern proslavery thought became more systematic and self-conscious, taking on the characteristics of a formal ideology with its resulting social movement. From this intensification came the pragmatic tone and inductive mode that the editor sees as a characteristic of southern proslavery writings from the 1830s onward. The selections, introductory comments, and bibliography of secondary works on the proslavery argument will be of value to readers interested in the history of slavery and of nineteenth-centruy American thought.

Choice by Anonim

Title Choice
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1984
Category Academic libraries
Total Pages 86
ISBN UIUC:30112018328580
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Gov Hammonds Letters on Southern Slavery
Author James Henry Hammond
Publisher Gabriel Kishinevski
Release Date 1845
Category Slavery
Total Pages 32
ISBN 9203456XXXX
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Mind Of The Master Class by Elizabeth Fox-Genovese

Title The Mind of the Master Class
Author Elizabeth Fox-Genovese
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2005-10-17
Category History
Total Pages 86
ISBN 1139446568
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Mind of the Master Class tells of America's greatest historical tragedy. It presents the slaveholders as men and women, a great many of whom were intelligent, honorable, and pious. It asks how people who were admirable in so many ways could have presided over a social system that proved itself an enormity and inflicted horrors on their slaves. The South had formidable proslavery intellectuals who participated fully in transatlantic debates and boldly challenged an ascendant capitalist ('free-labor') society. Blending classical and Christian traditions, they forged a moral and political philosophy designed to sustain conservative principles in history, political economy, social theory, and theology, while translating them into political action. Even those who judge their way of life most harshly have much to learn from their probing moral and political reflections on their times - and ours - beginning with the virtues and failings of their own society and culture.

Title Agriculture Geology and Society in Antebellum South Carolina
Author Edmund Ruffin
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2012-10-31
Category History
Total Pages 386
ISBN 0820341665
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The centerpiece of this generously annotated book is the diary kept by the celebrated agricultural reformer Edmund Ruffin during the eight months in 1843 when, at the request of Governor James Henry Hammond, he conducted an economic survey of South Carolina, traveling to every corner of the state to examine the different farming methods in use and the resources available for their improvement. Ruffin s succinct and pointed narrative, driven by a passionate interest in the perpetuation of slavery, recaptures for the modern reader the physical and social environment of the Palmetto State two decades before the outbreak of the Civil War in the Charleston harbor."

Young Frederick Douglass by Dickson J. Preston

Title Young Frederick Douglass
Author Dickson J. Preston
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2018-08-22
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781421425948
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This highly regarded biography traces the life and times of Frederick Douglass, from his birth on Maryland's Eastern Shore in 1818 to 1838, when he escaped from slavery to emerge upon the national scene.

To Make Men Free by Heather Cox Richardson

Title To Make Men Free
Author Heather Cox Richardson
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2014-09-23
Category History
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780465080663
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

When Abraham Lincoln helped create the Republican Party on the eve of the Civil War, his goal was to promote economic opportunity for all Americans, not just the slaveholding Southern planters who steered national politics. Yet, despite the egalitarian dream at the heart of its founding, the Republican Party quickly became mired in a fundamental identity crisis. Would it be the party of democratic ideals? Or would it be the party of moneyed interests? In the century and a half since, Republicans have vacillated between these two poles, with dire economic, political, and moral repercussions for the entire nation. In To Make Men Free, celebrated historian Heather Cox Richardson traces the shifting ideology of the Grand Old Party from the antebellum era to the Great Recession, revealing the insidious cycle of boom and bust that has characterized the Party since its inception. While in office, progressive Republicans like Teddy Roosevelt and Dwight Eisenhower revived Lincoln's vision of economic freedom and expanded the government, attacking the concentration of wealth and nurturing upward mobility. But they and others like them have been continually thwarted by powerful business interests in the Party. Their opponents appealed to Americans' latent racism and xenophobia to regain political power, linking taxation and regulation to redistribution and socialism. The results of the Party's wholesale embrace of big business are all too familiar: financial collapses like the Panic of 1893, the Great Depression in 1929, and the Great Recession in 2008. With each passing decade, with each missed opportunity and political misstep, the schism within the Republican Party has grown wider, pulling the GOP ever further from its founding principles. Expansive and authoritative, To Make Men Free is a sweeping history of the Party that was once America's greatest political hope -- and, time and time again, has proved its greatest disappointment.

The Hammonds Of Redcliffe by Carol K. Rothrock Bleser

Title The Hammonds of Redcliffe
Author Carol K. Rothrock Bleser
Publisher Reaktion Books
Release Date 1997
Category History
Total Pages 421
ISBN 1570032211
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The riveting saga of an articulate, intelligent Southern family blessed with wealth but marred by personal scandal.

The Slaveholding Crisis by Carl Lawrence Paulus

Title The Slaveholding Crisis
Author Carl Lawrence Paulus
Publisher LSU Press
Release Date 2017-01-03
Category History
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9780807164372
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In December 1860, South Carolinians voted to abandon the Union, sparking the deadliest war in American history. Led by a proslavery movement that viewed Abraham Lincoln’s place at the helm of the federal government as a real and present danger to the security of the South, southerners—both slaveholders and nonslaveholders—willingly risked civil war by seceding from the United States. Radical proslavery activists contended that without defending slavery’s westward expansion American planters would, like their former counterparts in the West Indies, become greatly outnumbered by those they enslaved. The result would transform the South into a mere colony within the federal government and make white southerners reliant on antislavery outsiders for protection of their personal safety and wealth. Faith in American exceptionalism played an important role in the reasoning of the antebellum American public, shaping how those in both the free and slave states viewed the world. Questions about who might share the bounty of the exceptional nature of the country became the battleground over which Americans fought, first with words, then with guns. Carl Lawrence Paulus’s The Slaveholding Crisis examines how, due to the fear of insurrection by the enslaved, southerners created their own version of American exceptionalism—one that placed the perpetuation of slavery at its forefront. Feeling a loss of power in the years before the Civil War, the planter elite no longer saw the Union, as a whole, fulfilling that vision of exceptionalism. As a result, Paulus contends, slaveholders and nonslaveholding southerners believed that the white South could anticipate racial conflict and brutal warfare. This narrative postulated that limiting slavery’s expansion within the Union was a riskier proposition than fighting a war of secession. In the end, Paulus argues, by insisting that the new party in control of the federal government promoted this very insurrection, the planter elite gained enough popular support to create the Confederate States of America. In doing so, they established a thoroughly proslavery, modern state with the military capability to quell massive resistance by the enslaved, expand its territorial borders, and war against the forces of the Atlantic antislavery movement.

The Cotton Kingdom by Frederick Law Olmsted

Title The Cotton Kingdom
Author Frederick Law Olmsted
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020-04-16
Category History
Total Pages 394
ISBN 037173794X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title South Carolina Historical Magazine
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1996
Category South Carolina
Total Pages 86
ISBN UVA:X006034472
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Mothers Of Invention by Drew Gilpin Faust

Title Mothers of Invention
Author Drew Gilpin Faust
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date 2004-01-01
Category History
Total Pages 326
ISBN 0807855731
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Exploring privileged Confederate women's wartime experiences, this book chronicles the clash of the old and the new within a group that was at once the beneficiary and the victim of the social order of the Old South.

Why The Civil War Came by Gabor S. Boritt

Title Why the Civil War Came
Author Gabor S. Boritt
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 1997-05-29
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780199761746
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the early morning of April 12, 1861, Captain George S. James ordered the bombardment of Fort Sumter, beginning a war that would last four horrific years and claim a staggering number of lives. Since that fateful day, the debate over the causes of the American Civil War has never ceased. What events were instrumental in bringing it about? How did individuals and institutions function? What did Northerners and Southerners believe in the decades of strife preceding the war? What steps did they take to avoid war? Indeed, was the great armed conflict avoidable at all? Why the Civil War Came brings a talented chorus of voices together to recapture the feel of a very different time and place, helping the reader to grasp more fully the commencement of our bloodiest war. From William W. Freehling's discussion of the peculiarities of North American slavery to Charles Royster's disturbing piece on the combatants' savage readiness to fight, the contributors bring to life the climate of a country on the brink of disaster. Mark Summers, for instance, depicts the tragically jubilant first weeks of Northern recruitment, when Americans on both sides were as yet unaware of the hellish slaughter that awaited them. Glenna Matthews underscores the important war-catalyzing role played by extraordinary public women, who proved that neither side of the Mason-Dixon line was as patriarchal as is thought. David Blight reveals an African-American world that "knew what time it was," and welcomed war. And Gabor Boritt examines the struggle's central figure, Lincoln himself, illuminating in the years leading up to the war a blindness on the future president's part, an unwillingness to confront the looming calamity that was about to smash the nation asunder. William E. Gienapp notes perhaps the most unsettling fact about the Civil War, that democratic institutions could not resolve the slavery issue without resorting to violence on an epic scale. With gripping detail, Why the Civil War Came takes readers back to a country fraught with bitterness, confusion, and hatred--a country ripe for a war of unprecedented bloodshed--to show why democracy failed, and violence reigned.