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Title I Am Sorry to Think I Have Raised a Timid Son
Author Kent Russell
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2016-02-09
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780804170444
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is a series of essays following a journey by Kent Russell who went over the country gathering experiences and comes back with a portrait of America and manhood.

Title In the Land of Good Living
Author Kent Russell
Publisher Knopf
Release Date 2020-07-07
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780525521396
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A wickedly smart, funny, and irresistibly off-kilter account of an improbable thousand-mile journey on foot into the heart of modern Florida, the state that Russell calls "America Concentrate." In the summer of 2016, Kent Russell--broke, at loose ends, hungry for adventure--set off to walk across Florida. Mythic, superficial, soaked in contradictions, maligned by cultural elites, segregated from the South, and literally vanishing into the sea, Florida (or, as he calls it: "America Concentrate") seemed to Russell to embody America's divided soul. The journey, with two friends intent on filming the ensuing mayhem, quickly reduces the trio to filthy drifters pushing a shopping cart of camera equipment. They get waylaid by a concerned citizen bearing a rifle; buy cocaine from an ex-wrestler; visit a spiritual medium; attend a cuckold party. The narrative overflows with historical detail about how modern Florida came into being after World War II, and how it came to be a petri dish for life in a suddenly, increasingly diverse new land of minority-majority cities and of unrivaled ethnic and religious variety. Russell has taken it all in with his incomparably focused lens and delivered a book that is both an inspired travelogue and a profound rumination on the nation's soul--and his own. It is a book that is wildly vivid, encyclopedic, erudite, and ferociously irreverent--a deeply ambivalent love letter to his sprawling, brazenly varied home state.

Title Nathan Boone and the American Frontier
Author R. Douglas Hurt
Publisher University of Missouri Press
Release Date 2000-09-27
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780826213181
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Celebrated as one of America's frontier heroes, Daniel Boone left a legacy that made the Boone name almost synonymous with frontier settlement. Nathan Boone, the youngest of Daniel's sons, played a vital role in American pioneering, following in much the same steps as his famous father. In Nathan Boone and the American Frontier, R. Douglas Hurt presents for the first time the life of this important frontiersman. Based on primary collections, newspaper articles, government documents, and secondary sources, this well-crafted biography begins with Nathan's childhood in present-day Kentucky and Virginia and then follows his family's move to Missouri. Hurt traces Boone's early activities as a hunter, trapper, and surveyor, as well as his leadership of a company of rangers during the War of 1812. After the war, Boone returned to survey work. In 1831, he organized another company of rangers for the Black Hawk War and returned to military life, making it his career. The remainder of the book recounts Boone's activities with the army in Iowa and the Indian Territory, where he was the first Boone to gain notice outside Missouri or Kentucky. Even today his work is recognized in the form of state parks, buildings, and place-names. Although Nathan Boone was an important figure, he lived much of his life in the shadow of his father. R. Douglas Hurt, however, makes a strong case for Nathan's contribution to the larger context of life in the American backcountry, especially the execution of military and Indian policy and the settlement of the frontier. By recognizing the significant role that Nathan Boone played, Nathan Boone and the American Frontier also provides the recognition due the many unheralded frontiersmen who helped settle the West. Anyone with an interest in the history of Missouri, the frontier, or the Boone name will find this book informative and compelling.

Gorilla And The Bird by Zack McDermott

Title Gorilla and the Bird
Author Zack McDermott
Publisher Hachette UK
Release Date 2017-09-26
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9780349413549
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

'One of the gems of the year' - Michele Magwood, Sunday Times (Books LIVE SA) The story of a young man fighting to recover from a devastating psychotic break and the mother who refuses to give up on him. Zack McDermott, a twenty-six-year-old Brooklyn public defender, woke up one morning convinced he was being filmed as part of an audition for a TV pilot. Every passerby was an actor; every car would magically stop for him; everything he saw was a cue from 'The Producer' to help inspire the performance of a lifetime. After a manic spree around Manhattan, Zack, who is bipolar, was arrested on a subway platform and admitted to hospital. So begins the story of Zack's free fall into psychosis and his desperate, poignant, often darkly funny struggle to claw his way back to sanity, regain his identity, and rebuild some semblance of a stable life. It's a journey that will take him from New York City back to his Kansas roots and to the one person who might be able to save him, his tough, bighearted Midwestern mother, nicknamed the Bird, whose fierce and steadfast love is the light in Zack's dark world. Before his odyssey is over, Zack will be tackled by guards in mental wards, run naked through cornfields, receive secret messages from the TV, befriend a former Navy SEAL and his talking stuffed monkey and see the Virgin Mary in the whorls of his own back hair. But with the Bird's help, he just might have a shot at pulling through, starting over, and maybe even meeting a woman who can love him back, bipolar and all. Written with raw emotional power, humor, and tenderness, Gorilla and the Bird is a bravely honest account of a young man's unraveling and the relationship that saves him.

Green Metropolis by David Owen

Title Green Metropolis
Author David Owen
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2009-09-17
Category Social Science
Total Pages 368
ISBN 1101140313
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Look out for David Owen's next book, Where the Water Goes. A challenging, controversial, and highly readable look at our lives, our world, and our future. Most Americans think of crowded cities as ecological nightmares, as wastelands of concrete and garbage and diesel fumes and traffic jams. Yet residents of compact urban centers, Owen shows, individually consume less oil, electricity, and water than other Americans. They live in smaller spaces, discard less trash, and, most important of all, spend far less time in automobiles. Residents of Manhattan—the most densely populated place in North America—rank first in public-transit use and last in percapita greenhouse-gas production, and they consume gasoline at a rate that the country as a whole hasn’t matched since the mid-1920s, when the most widely owned car in the United States was the Ford Model T. They are also among the only people in the United States for whom walking is still an important means of daily transportation. These achievements are not accidents. Spreading people thinly across the countryside may make them feel green, but it doesn’t reduce the damage they do to the environment. In fact, it increases the damage, while also making the problems they cause harder to see and to address. Owen contends that the environmental problem we face, at the current stage of our assault on the world’s nonrenewable resources, is not how to make teeming cities more like the pristine countryside. The problem is how to make other settled places more like Manhattan, whose residents presently come closer than any other Americans to meeting environmental goals that all of us, eventually, will have to come to terms with. From the Trade Paperback edition.

God Of Beer by Garret Keizer

Title God of Beer
Author Garret Keizer
Publisher University Press of New England
Release Date 2016-02-02
Category Juvenile Fiction
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781611689167
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the remote mill town of Salmon Falls, Vermont, the dead of winter can feel like death itself. Jobs are scarce, kids are bored, and it sometimes seems there's nothing better to do than drink. But when eighteen-year-old Kyle Nelson and a motley group of friends decide to challenge both the legal drinking age and the local drinking culture with a daring act of civil disobedience, they find there's more to do than they ever imagined. Garret Keizer's gripping novel about young men and women in revolt bears witness to the power of ideas, the bonds of friendship, and the trials of working-class kids on the margins of American society. His story never flinches in the face of those forces that conspire against, but needn't overcome, the resilient spirits of the young.

Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace

Title Infinite Jest
Author David Foster Wallace
Publisher Back Bay Books
Release Date 2009-04-13
Category Fiction
Total Pages 1104
ISBN 9780316073851
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A gargantuan, mind-altering comedy about the Pursuit of Happiness in America Set in an addicts' halfway house and a tennis academy, and featuring the most endearingly screwed-up family to come along in recent fiction, Infinite Jest explores essential questions about what entertainment is and why it has come to so dominate our lives; about how our desire for entertainment affects our need to connect with other people; and about what the pleasures we choose say about who we are. Equal parts philosophical quest and screwball comedy, Infinite Jest bends every rule of fiction without sacrificing for a moment its own entertainment value. It is an exuberant, uniquely American exploration of the passions that make us human - and one of those rare books that renew the idea of what a novel can do. "The next step in fiction...Edgy, accurate, and darkly witty...Think Beckett, think Pynchon, think Gaddis. Think." --Sven Birkerts, The Atlantic

Things We Didn T See Coming by Steven Amsterdam

Title Things We Didn t See Coming
Author Steven Amsterdam
Publisher Anchor
Release Date 2010-02-02
Category Fiction
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780307378910
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Michael Williams, in Melbourne’s The Age, wrote of this award-winning, dazzling debut collection, “By turns horrific and beautiful . . . Humanity at its most fractured and desolate . . . Often moving, frequently surprising, even blackly funny . . . Things We Didn’t See Coming is terrific.” This is just one of the many rave reviews that appeared on the Australian publication of these nine connected stories set in a not-too-distant dystopian future in a landscape at once utterly fantastic and disturbingly familiar. Richly imagined, dark, and darkly comic, the stories follow the narrator over three decades as he tries to survive in a world that is becoming increasingly savage as cataclysmic events unfold one after another. In the first story, “What We Know Now”—set in the eve of the millennium, when the world as we know it is still recognizable—we meet the then-nine-year-old narrator fleeing the city with his parents, just ahead of a Y2K breakdown. The remaining stories capture the strange—sometimes heartbreaking, sometimes funny—circumstances he encounters in the no-longer-simple act of survival; trying to protect squatters against floods in a place where the rain never stops, being harassed (and possibly infected) by a man sick with a virulent flu, enduring a job interview with an unstable assessor who has access to all his thoughts, taking the gravely ill on adventure tours. But we see in each story that, despite the violence and brutality of his days, the narrator retains a hold on his essential humanity—and humor. Things We Didn’t See Coming is haunting, restrained, and beautifully crafted—a stunning debut. From the Hardcover edition.

The Future Of Nostalgia by Svetlana Boym

Title The Future of Nostalgia
Author Svetlana Boym
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2008-08-05
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780786724871
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Combining personal memoir, philosophical essay, and historical analysis, Svetlana Boym explores the spaces of collective nostalgia that connect national biography and personal self-fashioning in the twenty-first century. She guides us through the ruins and construction sites of post-communist cities-St. Petersburg, Moscow, Berlin, and Prague-and the imagined homelands of exiles-Benjamin, Nabokov, Mandelstahm, and Brodsky. From Jurassic Park to the Totalitarian Sculpture Garden, Boym unravels the threads of this global epidemic of longing and its antidotes.

The Matrix And Philosophy by William Irwin

Title The Matrix and Philosophy
Author William Irwin
Publisher Open Court Publishing
Release Date 2002
Category Performing Arts
Total Pages 280
ISBN 0812695011
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Presents essays exploring the philosophical themes of the motion picture "The Matrix," which portrays a false world created from nothing but perceptions.

No Angel by Penny Vincenzi

Title No Angel
Author Penny Vincenzi
Publisher Headline
Release Date 2008-09-04
Category Fiction
Total Pages 736
ISBN 9780755351527
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the Sunday Times bestselling author Penny Vincenzi, NO ANGEL is the first novel in the acclaimed Spoils of Time trilogy. 'Penny Vincenzi dazzlingly combines the old-fashioned virtues of gripping storytelling with the up-to-the-minute contemporary feel for emotional depth and insight into the lives of the characters. She is a supreme stylist and clever writer. Reading her is an addictive experience'-Elizabeth Buchan. For any reader of Jilly Cooper, Harriet Evans or Santa Montefiore. In pre-war London, Lady Celia Lytton is the perfect host. Beautiful, intelligent and determined, she throws glittering parties, publishes bestselling books, and enjoys her young family and loving husband. But there are tragedies her family will not escape: the Titanic, the First World War, the flu epidemic. And beneath their perfect image, the Lyttons cannot ignore the changing world around them. In the shattering aftermath of the War, Celia is beginning to understand that there will be a price to pay for the life she has chosen, that is greater than she could ever have imagined...

Pulphead by John Jeremiah Sullivan

Title Pulphead
Author John Jeremiah Sullivan
Publisher FSG Originals
Release Date 2011-10-25
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781429995047
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A New York Times Notable Book for 2011 One of Entertainment Weekly's Top 10 Nonfiction Books of the Year 2011 A Time Magazine Top 10 Nonfiction book of 2011 A Boston Globe Best Nonfiction Book of 2011 One of Library Journal's Best Books of 2011 A sharp-eyed, uniquely humane tour of America's cultural landscape—from high to low to lower than low—by the award-winning young star of the literary nonfiction world. In Pulphead, John Jeremiah Sullivan takes us on an exhilarating tour of our popular, unpopular, and at times completely forgotten culture. Simultaneously channeling the gonzo energy of Hunter S. Thompson and the wit and insight of Joan Didion, Sullivan shows us—with a laidback, erudite Southern charm that's all his own—how we really (no, really) live now. In his native Kentucky, Sullivan introduces us to Constantine Rafinesque, a nineteenth-century polymath genius who concocted a dense, fantastical prehistory of the New World. Back in modern times, Sullivan takes us to the Ozarks for a Christian rock festival; to Florida to meet the alumni and straggling refugees of MTV's Real World, who've generated their own self-perpetuating economy of minor celebrity; and all across the South on the trail of the blues. He takes us to Indiana to investigate the formative years of Michael Jackson and Axl Rose and then to the Gulf Coast in the wake of Katrina—and back again as its residents confront the BP oil spill. Gradually, a unifying narrative emerges, a story about this country that we've never heard told this way. It's like a fun-house hall-of-mirrors tour: Sullivan shows us who we are in ways we've never imagined to be true. Of course we don't know whether to laugh or cry when faced with this reflection—it's our inevitable sob-guffaws that attest to the power of Sullivan's work.

Arbitrary Stupid Goal by Tamara Shopsin

Title Arbitrary Stupid Goal
Author Tamara Shopsin
Publisher MCD
Release Date 2017-07-18
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9780374715809
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

One of The New Yorker's "Books We Loved in 2017" “Arbitrary Stupid Goal is a completely riveting world—when I looked up from its pages regular life seemed boring and safe and modern like one big iPhone. This book captures not just a lost New York but a whole lost way of life.” —Miranda July In Arbitrary Stupid Goal, Tamara Shopsin takes the reader on a pointillist time-travel trip to the Greenwich Village of her bohemian 1970s childhood, a funky, tight-knit small town in the big city, long before Sex and the City tours and luxury condos. The center of Tamara’s universe is Shopsin’s, her family’s legendary greasy spoon, aka “The Store,” run by her inimitable dad, Kenny—a loquacious, contrary, huge-hearted man who, aside from dishing up New York’s best egg salad on rye, is Village sheriff, philosopher, and fixer all at once. All comers find a place at Shopsin’s table and feast on Kenny’s tall tales and trenchant advice along with the incomparable chili con carne. Filled with clever illustrations and witty, nostalgic photographs and graphics, and told in a sly, elliptical narrative that is both hilarious and endearing, Arbitrary Stupid Goal is an offbeat memory-book mosaic about the secrets of living an unconventional life, which is becoming a forgotten art.

The Giant S House by Elizabeth McCracken

Title The Giant s House
Author Elizabeth McCracken
Publisher Random House
Release Date 2013-01-31
Category Fiction
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781409039679
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

‘Every so often a novel comes along which transcends whimsy with the beauty of its writing. Elizabeth McCracken's small masterpiece is one of these' Guardian A powerful and unique story about connection, showing that miracles can happen – even across a library circulation desk. The year is 1950, and in a small town on Cape Cod twenty-eight year old librarian Peggy Cort feels as if love and life have stood her up. That is, until the day James Carlson Sweatt – the 'over-tall' eleven year old boy who's the talk of the town – walks into her library and changes her life for ever. Two misfits whose lonely paths cross at the circulation desk, Peggy and James are odd candidates for friendship. In James, Peggy discovers the one person who's ever really understood her, and as he grows – six foot five at age twelve, then seven foot, then eight – so does their most singular romance. *Perfect for readers who loved Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine*

Heaven Is For Real by Todd Burpo

Title Heaven is for Real
Author Todd Burpo
Publisher Thomas Nelson Inc
Release Date 2011
Category Religion
Total Pages 119
ISBN 9781418550684
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Why should we care about heaven? -- What is heaven like? -- When does a person go to heaven? -- Where is heaven? -- Who goes to heaven?

Ducks Newburyport by Lucy Ellmann

Title Ducks Newburyport
Author Lucy Ellmann
Publisher Biblioasis
Release Date 2019-08-20
Category Fiction
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781771963084
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

SHORTLISTED FOR THE 2019 BOOKER PRIZE Baking a multitude of tartes tatins for local restaurants, an Ohio housewife contemplates her four kids, husband, cats and chickens. Also, America's ignoble past, and her own regrets. She is surrounded by dead lakes, fake facts, Open Carry maniacs, and oodles of online advice about survivalism, veil toss duties, and how to be more like Jane Fonda. But what do you do when you keep stepping on your son's toy tractors, your life depends on stolen land and broken treaties, and nobody helps you when you get a flat tire on the interstate, not even the Abominable Snowman? When are you allowed to start swearing? With a torrent of consciousness and an intoxicating coziness, Ducks, Newburyport lays out a whole world for you to tramp around in, by turns frightening and funny. A heart-rending indictment of America's barbarity, and a lament for the way we are blundering into environmental disaster, this book is both heresy—and a revolution in the novel.

The Help by Kathryn Stockett

Title The Help
Author Kathryn Stockett
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2009-02-10
Category Fiction
Total Pages 544
ISBN 9781440697661
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The #1 New York Times bestselling novel and basis for the Academy Award-winning film—a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don’t—nominated as one of America’s best-loved novels by PBS’s The Great American Read. Aibileen is a black maid in 1962 Jackson, Mississippi, who’s always taken orders quietly, but lately she’s unable to hold her bitterness back. Her friend Minny has never held her tongue but now must somehow keep secrets about her employer that leave her speechless. White socialite Skeeter just graduated college. She’s full of ambition, but without a husband, she’s considered a failure. Together, these seemingly different women join together to write a tell-all book about work as a black maid in the South, that could forever alter their destinies and the life of a small town...

Title We Have Always Lived in the Castle
Author Shirley Jackson
Publisher New Canadian Library
Release Date 2016-01-05
Category Fiction
Total Pages 124
ISBN 9781551999524
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The final novel from one of the twentieth century’s greatest writers. Most of the Blackwoods are dead. They were poisoned by arsenic, and the suspected murderer – Constance Blackwood – still lives in their family estate. In fact, she never leaves. Nor does her Uncle Julian, who is confined to a wheelchair. The only person to leave the house is her sister, the third remaining Blackwood, Merricat, and even she keeps her visits to town to a minimum. The townsfolk don’t like the Blackwoods; understandable, when one of them could be a mass murderer. Constance, Merricat, and Julian maintain a semblance of a normal, if highly reclusive, life, aided – if Merricat is to be believed – by several magical wards and charm. But when one of these charms is disrupted, her estranged cousin Charles turns up for a visit, and threatens to throw the Blackwoods’ fragile peace into chaos. Penguin Random House Canada is proud to bring you classic works of literature in e-book form, with the highest quality production values. Find more today and rediscover books you never knew you loved.

The Count Of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas

Title The Count of Monte Cristo
Author Alexandre Dumas
Publisher Library of Alexandria
Release Date 1926
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781613104927
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

ÊOn the 24th of February, 1815, the look-out at Notre-Dame de la Garde signalled the three-master, thePharaonÊfrom Smyrna, Trieste, and Naples. As usual, a pilot put off immediately, and rounding the Chateau d'If, got on board the vessel between Cape Morgion and Rion island. Immediately, and according to custom, the ramparts of Fort Saint-Jean were covered with spectators; it is always an event at Marseilles for a ship to come into port, especially when this ship, like theÊPharaon, has been built, rigged, and laden at the old Phocee docks, and belongs to an owner of the city. The ship drew on and had safely passed the strait, which some volcanic shock has made between the Calasareigne and Jaros islands; had doubled Pomegue, and approached the harbor under topsails, jib, and spanker, but so slowly and sedately that the idlers, with that instinct which is the forerunner of evil, asked one another what misfortune could have happened on board. However, those experienced in navigation saw plainly that if any accident had occurred, it was not to the vessel herself, for she bore down with all the evidence of being skilfully handled, the anchor a-cockbill, the jib-boom guys already eased off, and standing by the side of the pilot, who was steering theÊPharaonÊtowards the narrow entrance of the inner port, was a young man, who, with activity and vigilant eye, watched every motion of the ship, and repeated each direction of the pilot. The vague disquietude which prevailed among the spectators had so much affected one of the crowd that he did not await the arrival of the vessel in harbor, but jumping into a small skiff, desired to be pulled alongside thePharaon, which he reached as she rounded into La Reserve basin. When the young man on board saw this person approach, he left his station by the pilot, and, hat in hand, leaned over the ship's bulwarks. He was a fine, tall, slim young fellow of eighteen or twenty, with black eyes, and hair as dark as a raven's wing; and his whole appearance bespoke that calmness and resolution peculiar to men accustomed from their cradle to contend with danger.

Touching Spirit Bear by Ben Mikaelsen

Title Touching Spirit Bear
Author Ben Mikaelsen
Publisher Harper Collins
Release Date 2010-04-20
Category Juvenile Fiction
Total Pages 256
ISBN 0062009680
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In his Nautilus Award-winning classic Touching Spirit Bear, author Ben Mikaelson delivers a powerful coming-of-age story of a boy who must overcome the effects that violence has had on his life. After severely injuring Peter Driscal in an empty parking lot, mischief-maker Cole Matthews is in major trouble. But instead of jail time, Cole is given another option: attend Circle Justice, an alternative program that sends juvenile offenders to a remote Alaskan Island to focus on changing their ways. Desperate to avoid prison, Cole fakes humility and agrees to go. While there, Cole is mauled by a mysterious white bear and left for dead. Thoughts of his abusive parents, helpless Peter, and his own anger cause him to examine his actions and seek redemption—from the spirit bear that attacked him, from his victims, and, most importantly, from himself. Ben Mikaelsen paints a vivid picture of a juvenile offender, examining the roots of his anger without absolving him of responsibility for his actions, and questioning a society in which angry people make victims of their peers and communities. Touching Spirit Bear is a poignant testimonial to the power of a pain that can destroy, or lead to healing. A strong choice for independent reading, sharing in the classroom, homeschooling, and book groups.