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Title Gone from the Promised Land
Author John R. Hall
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2017-07-12
Category History
Total Pages 404
ISBN 9781351516907
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this superb cultural history, John R. Hall presents a reasoned analysis of the meaning of Jonestown--why it happened and how it is tied to our history as a nation, our ideals, our practices, and the tension of modern culture. Hall deflates the myths of Jonestown by exploring how much of what transpired was unique to the group and its leader and how much can be explained by reference to wider social processes.

Title Black Sheep and Kissing Cousins
Author Elizabeth Stone
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2017-09-08
Category Social Science
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9781351320900
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

When someone says, at a holiday dinner table, "Oh, those Lawrence cousins lose control all the time," or "the Davises always had more talent than luck," you can be sure there's a lesson being passed along, from one generation to another. Who tells stories to whom and about what is never a random matter. Our family stories have a secret power: they play a unique role in shaping our identity, our sense of our place in the world. The give us values, inspirations, warnings, incentives. We need them. We use them. We keep them. They reverberate throughout our lives, affecting our choices in love, work, friendship, and lifestyle. Elizabeth Stone, whose grandparents came from Italy to Brooklyn, artfully weaves her own family stories among the stories of more than a hundred people of all backgrounds, ages, and regions - clarifying for us predictable types of family legends, providing ways to interpret our own stories and their roles in our lives. She examines stories of birth, death, work, money, romantic adventure - all in the context of the family storytelling ritual. And she shows how stories about our most ancient ancestors may provide answers at milestone moments in our lives, as well as how stories about our newest family members carve out places for them so they will fit into their families, comfortably or otherwise. Upon its initial publication in 1988, Studs Terkel said that the book is "A wholly original approach to an ancient theme: family storytelling and its lasting mark on the individual." Judy Collins noted that "Elizabeth Stone's marvelous book on family myths and fables is irresistible. It lets us in on our own secrets in a provocative and exciting way." And Maggie Scarf wrote, "What a clever topic, and how beautifully Elizabeth Stone has written about it! I recommend Black Sheep and Kissing Cousins for everyone who has ever been raised in a family."

Pagans In The Promised Land by Steven T. Newcomb

Title Pagans in the Promised Land
Author Steven T. Newcomb
Publisher Fulcrum Publishing
Release Date 2008
Category Law
Total Pages 186
ISBN 1555916422
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An analysis of how religious bias shaped U.S. federal Indian law.

Title Manchild in the Promised Land
Author Claude Brown
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2012-01-03
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9781451626674
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the author's experiences as a first-generation African American raised in the Northern ghettos of Harlem in the mid-20th century, an upbringing marked by violence, drugs and devastating urban disadvantages.

Promised Land by Martin Fletcher

Title Promised Land
Author Martin Fletcher
Publisher Thomas Dunne Books
Release Date 2018-09-04
Category Fiction
Total Pages 400
ISBN 9781250118844
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Martin Fletcher, who headed up NBC TV’s Tel Aviv News Bureau, knows his territory and it shows on every page. Promised Land is a great sweeping epic, reminiscent of Leon Uris’ Exodus; a moving story of triumph and tragedy, new love and historic hate, expertly told by a cast of unforgettable characters. Fletcher’s writing is superb and rises to the level of importance that this story demands and deserves. Historical novels don’t get much better than Promised Land." —Nelson DeMille, #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Cuban Affair Promised Land is the sweeping saga of two brothers and the woman they love, a devastating love triangle set against the tumultuous founding of Israel. The story begins when fourteen-year-old Peter is sent west to America to escape the growing horror of Nazi Germany. But his younger brother Arie and their entire family are sent east to the death camps. Only Arie survives. The brothers reunite in the nascent Jewish state, where Arie becomes a businessman and one of the richest men in Israel while Peter becomes a top Mossad agent heading some of Israel’s most vital espionage operations. One brother builds Israel, the other protects it. But they also fall in love with the same woman, Tamara, a lonely Jewish refugee from Cairo. And over the next two decades, as their new homeland faces extraordinary obstacles that could destroy it, the brothers’ intrigues and jealousies threaten to tear their new lives apart. Promised Land is at once the gripping tale of a struggling family and an epic about a struggling nation.

The Promised Land by Nicholas Lemann

Title The Promised Land
Author Nicholas Lemann
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2011-08-24
Category History
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780307764874
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A New York Times bestseller, the groundbreaking authoritative history of the migration of African-Americans from the rural South to the urban North. A definitive book on American history, The Promised Land is also essential reading for educators and policymakers at both national and local levels.

Title Migrants from the Promised Land
Author Zvi Sobel
Publisher Transaction Publishers
Release Date 2021
Category History
Total Pages 245
ISBN 1412828619
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In December 1983, Israeli radio and television blitzed the nation with programming on "yerida "--emigration from Israel. So much attention has been given to emigration that the casual observer might think it is the central threat to Israeli society. Demographics show that it is not, but emotions continue to run high on the subject. In "Migrants from the Promised Land, "Zvi Sobel explores the reasons for emigration from contemporary Israel within the context of a far-ranging critical assessment of Israeli society and the Zionist enterprise. He asks why, in light of near devastating challenges to the survival of Israel, does emigration assume such overwhelming importance among both elites and masses. His analysis is based on intensive interviews with hundreds of people preparing to leave Israel and a thorough examination of all relevant demographics.

My Promised Land by Ari Shavit

Title My Promised Land
Author Ari Shavit
Publisher Random House
Release Date 2013-11-19
Category History
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9780812984644
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW AND THE ECONOMIST Winner of the Natan Book Award, the National Jewish Book Award, and the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award An authoritative and deeply personal narrative history of the State of Israel, by one of the most influential journalists writing about the Middle East today Not since Thomas L. Friedman’s groundbreaking From Beirut to Jerusalem has a book captured the essence and the beating heart of the Middle East as keenly and dynamically as My Promised Land. Facing unprecedented internal and external pressures, Israel today is at a moment of existential crisis. Ari Shavit draws on interviews, historical documents, private diaries, and letters, as well as his own family’s story, illuminating the pivotal moments of the Zionist century to tell a riveting narrative that is larger than the sum of its parts: both personal and national, both deeply human and of profound historical dimension. We meet Shavit’s great-grandfather, a British Zionist who in 1897 visited the Holy Land on a Thomas Cook tour and understood that it was the way of the future for his people; the idealist young farmer who bought land from his Arab neighbor in the 1920s to grow the Jaffa oranges that would create Palestine’s booming economy; the visionary youth group leader who, in the 1940s, transformed Masada from the neglected ruins of an extremist sect into a powerful symbol for Zionism; the Palestinian who as a young man in 1948 was driven with his family from his home during the expulsion from Lydda; the immigrant orphans of Europe’s Holocaust, who took on menial work and focused on raising their children to become the leaders of the new state; the pragmatic engineer who was instrumental in developing Israel’s nuclear program in the 1960s, in the only interview he ever gave; the zealous religious Zionists who started the settler movement in the 1970s; the dot-com entrepreneurs and young men and women behind Tel-Aviv’s booming club scene; and today’s architects of Israel’s foreign policy with Iran, whose nuclear threat looms ominously over the tiny country. As it examines the complexities and contradictions of the Israeli condition, My Promised Land asks difficult but important questions: Why did Israel come to be? How did it come to be? Can Israel survive? Culminating with an analysis of the issues and threats that Israel is currently facing, My Promised Land uses the defining events of the past to shed new light on the present. The result is a landmark portrait of a small, vibrant country living on the edge, whose identity and presence play a crucial role in today’s global political landscape. Praise for My Promised Land “This book will sweep you up in its narrative force and not let go of you until it is done. [Shavit’s] accomplishment is so unlikely, so total . . . that it makes you believe anything is possible, even, God help us, peace in the Middle East.”—Simon Schama, Financial Times “[A] must-read book.”—Thomas L. Friedman, The New York Times “Important and powerful . . . the least tendentious book about Israel I have ever read.”—Leon Wieseltier, The New York Times Book Review “Spellbinding . . . Shavit’s prophetic voice carries lessons that all sides need to hear.”—The Economist “One of the most nuanced and challenging books written on Israel in years.”—The Wall Street Journal

Promised Land by Jay Parini

Title Promised Land
Author Jay Parini
Publisher Anchor
Release Date 2010
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 385
ISBN 9780307386182
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Looks at thirteen literary works that had a profound influence on American history, culture, and character, including "The Federalist Papers," "Uncle Tom's Cabin," "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," and "The Souls of Black Folk."

Farewell Promised Land by Robert Dawson

Title Farewell Promised Land
Author Robert Dawson
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 1999-01-01
Category History
Total Pages 233
ISBN 0520211235
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Don't mistake the message of this sad and powerful book. After 150 years of pillage and pollution, it is time to fight like hell for California."--Mike Davis, author of City of Quartz "A heart rendingly splendid book for all who love California. It combines stunning photographic documentation of the trashing of the state with an eloquent, melancholy text that still offers guarded hopes for a green future."--Ernest Callenbach, author of Ecotopia

Promised Land by Robert Whitlow

Title Promised Land
Author Robert Whitlow
Publisher Thomas Nelson
Release Date 2020-01-14
Category Fiction
Total Pages 400
ISBN 9780718084233
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

With historical mysteries, religious intrigue, and political danger, Promised Land asks one momentous question: What if your calling puts you—and your family—in the crosshairs? Despite their Israeli citizenship, Hana and Daud cannot safely return to their homeland because a dangerous terrorist ring is threatening Daud. Hana is perfectly fine remaining in the United States, working for a law firm in Atlanta, especially when she learns she’s pregnant. But Daud can’t shake the draw to return home to Israel, even if it makes him a walking target. Hana is helping her boss plan a huge Middle East summit in Atlanta when Jakob Brodsky, her old friend and former co-litigator, asks for her help with a case. His client is attempting to recover ancient artifacts stolen from his Jewish great-grandfather by a Soviet colonel at the end of World War II. Because the case crosses several national borders, he needs Hana’s knowledge and skill to get to the bottom of what happened to these precious artifacts. Meanwhile, Daud is called in to help a US intelligence agency extract a Ukrainian doctor from a dangerous situation in Egypt. While overseas, he can’t resist the call of Jerusalem and thus sets off a series of events that puts thousands of people in danger, including his wife and unborn child. Bestselling author Robert Whitlow explores the meaning of family and home—and how faith forms the identity of both—in this breathtaking sequel to Chosen People. Praise for Promised Land: “Promised Land is a book about coming home. Of becoming settled in your spirit and your relationships. With layers of intensity, thanks to international intrigue, moments of legal wrangling, and pages of sweet relationships, this book is rich and complex. A wonderful read.” —Cara Putman, author of Flight Risk

Their Promised Land by Ian Buruma

Title Their Promised Land
Author Ian Buruma
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2016-01-19
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780698410183
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A family history of surpassing beauty and power: Ian Buruma’s account of his grandparents’ enduring love through the terror and separation of two world wars During the almost six years England was at war with Nazi Germany, Winifred and Bernard Schlesinger, Ian Buruma’s grandparents, and the film director John Schlesinger's parents, were, like so many others, thoroughly sundered from each other. Their only recourse was to write letters back and forth. And write they did, often every day. In a way they were just picking up where they left off in 1918, at the end of their first long separation because of the Great War that swept Bernard away to some of Europe’s bloodiest battlefields. The thousands of letters between them were part of an inheritance that ultimately came into the hands of their grandson, Ian Buruma. Now, in a labor of love that is also a powerful act of artistic creation, Ian Buruma has woven his own voice in with theirs to provide the context and counterpoint necessary to bring to life, not just a remarkable marriage, but a class, and an age. Winifred and Bernard inherited the high European cultural ideals and attitudes that came of being born into prosperous German-Jewish émigré families. To young Ian, who would visit from Holland every Christmas, they seemed the very essence of England, their spacious Berkshire estate the model of genteel English country life at its most pleasant and refined. It wasn’t until years later that he discovered how much more there was to the story. At its heart, Their Promised Land is the story of cultural assimilation. The Schlesingers were very British in the way their relatives in Germany were very German, until Hitler destroyed that option. The problems of being Jewish and facing anti-Semitism even in the country they loved were met with a kind of stoic discretion. But they showed solidarity when it mattered most. As the shadows of war lengthened again, the Schlesingers mounted a remarkable effort, which Ian Buruma describes movingly, to rescue twelve Jewish children from the Nazis and see to their upkeep in England. Many are the books that do bad marriages justice; precious few books take readers inside a good marriage. In Their Promised Land, Buruma has done just that; introducing us to a couple whose love was sustaining through the darkest hours of the century. Look for Ian's new book, A Tokyo Romance, in March, 2018.

Yordim by Micha Lev

Title Yordim
Author Micha Lev
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1986
Category Fiction
Total Pages 366
ISBN UCAL:B4351504
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Peasants In The Promised Land by Jaroslav Petryshyn

Title Peasants in the Promised Land
Author Jaroslav Petryshyn
Publisher James Lorimer & Company
Release Date 1985
Category History
Total Pages 265
ISBN 0888629257
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

For many years following Confederation, Canada remained an absurd country: with its vast West still free of agricultural settlers, John A. Macdonald's vision of a great nation bound together by a transcontinental railway and a nationalist economic policy remained an unfulfilled dream. On the other side of the Atlantic, the present-day Ukraine was vastly overpopulated with "redundant" peasants. Their increasingly precarious existence triggered emigration: more than 170 000 of them sailed for Canada. Life in the promised land was hard. Many Canadians seemed to think that the only good immigrants were British; some went so far as to suggest that the Ukrainian newcomers were less than human. But on the harsh and remote prairies, the Ukrainians triumphed over the toil and isolation of homesteading, putting down roots and prospering. Peasants in the Promised Land is the first book to focus on the formative period of Ukrainian settlement in Canada. Drawing on his exhaustive research, including Ukrainian-language archival sources, Jaroslav Petryshyn brings history to life with extracts from memoirs, letters and newspapers of the period. His text is illustrated with maps and historical photographs.

Barren In The Promised Land by Elaine Tyler May

Title Barren in the Promised Land
Author Elaine Tyler May
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 1997
Category Social Science
Total Pages 318
ISBN 0674061829
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Chronicling astonishing shifts in public attitudes toward reproduction, May reveals the intersection between public life and the most private part of our lives--sexuality, procreation, and family.

Title Promised Land on the Solomon
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1986
Category African American architecture
Total Pages 133
ISBN MINN:31951002941473Y
Language English, Spanish, and French
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The Promised Land by Rawls Howard

Title The Promised Land
Author Rawls Howard
Publisher Copernicus Publishing
Release Date 2018-10-15
Category
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780578209166
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Discovering the Kingdom of God in Eastern North Carolina. A small-town boy's adventures in the Land of Milk and Honey.

Title Gone from the Promised Land
Author John R. Hall
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2004
Category Jonestown Mass Suicide, Jonestown, Guyana, 1978
Total Pages 381
ISBN 076580588X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Too Often Promised Land by Richard H. Curtiss

Title Too Often Promised Land
Author Richard H. Curtiss
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1980
Category Arab-Israeli conflict
Total Pages 74
ISBN UOM:39015012934025
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Competition In The Promised Land by Leah Platt Boustan

Title Competition in the Promised Land
Author Leah Platt Boustan
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2020-06-09
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 216
ISBN 9780691202495
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From 1940 to 1970, nearly four million black migrants left the American rural South to settle in the industrial cities of the North and West. Competition in the Promised Land provides a comprehensive account of the long-lasting effects of the influx of black workers on labor markets and urban space in receiving areas. Traditionally, the Great Black Migration has been lauded as a path to general black economic progress. Leah Boustan challenges this view, arguing instead that the migration produced winners and losers within the black community. Boustan shows that migrants themselves gained tremendously, more than doubling their earnings by moving North. But these new arrivals competed with existing black workers, limiting black–white wage convergence in Northern labor markets and slowing black economic growth. Furthermore, many white households responded to the black migration by relocating to the suburbs. White flight was motivated not only by neighborhood racial change but also by the desire on the part of white residents to avoid participating in the local public services and fiscal obligations of increasingly diverse cities. Employing historical census data and state-of-the-art econometric methods, Competition in the Promised Land revises our understanding of the Great Black Migration and its role in the transformation of American society.