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Gold Mining Boomtown by Roberta Key Haldane

Title Gold Mining Boomtown
Author Roberta Key Haldane
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2013-08-15
Category History
Total Pages 344
ISBN 9780806150673
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The town of White Oaks, New Mexico Territory, was born in 1879 when prospectors discovered gold at nearby Baxter Mountain. In Gold-Mining Boomtown, Roberta Key Haldane offers an intimate portrait of the southeastern New Mexico community by profiling more than forty families and individuals who made their homes there during its heyday. Today, fewer than a hundred people live in White Oaks. Its frontier incarnation, located a scant twenty-eight miles from the notorious Lincoln, is remembered largely because of its association with famous westerners. Billy the Kid and his gang were familiar visitors to the town. When a popular deputy was gunned down in 1880, the citizens resolved to rid their community of outlaws. Pat Garrett, running for sheriff of Lincoln County, was soon campaigning in White Oaks. But there was more to the town than gold mining and frontier violence. In addition to outlaws, lawmen, and miners, Haldane introduces readers to ranchers, doctors, saloonkeepers, and stagecoach owners. José Aguayo, a lawyer from an old Spanish family, defended Billy the Kid, survived the Lincoln County War, and moved to the White Oaks vicinity in 1890, where his family became famous for the goat cheese they sold to the town’s elite. Readers also meet a New England sea captain and his wife (a Samoan princess, no less), a black entrepreneur, Chinese miners, the “Cattle Queen of New Mexico,” and an undertaker with an international criminal past. The White Oaks that Haldane uncovers—and depicts with lively prose and more than 250 photographs—is a microcosm of the Old West in its diversity and evolution from mining camp to thriving burg to the near–ghost town it is today. Anyone interested in the history of the Southwest will enjoy this richly detailed account.

The Ebb Flow Of A Boom Town by George J. Dellar

Title The Ebb flow of a Boom Town
Author George J. Dellar
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1966
Category Bullfinch (W.A.)
Total Pages 188
ISBN OCLC:221163564
Language English, Spanish, and French
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A Rough And Tumble Country by Chris Allan (Historian)

Title A Rough and Tumble Country
Author Chris Allan (Historian)
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020
Category
Total Pages 26
ISBN OCLC:1227048868
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Gold Mining Boomtown by Roberta Key Haldane

Title Gold Mining Boomtown
Author Roberta Key Haldane
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2013-08-15
Category History
Total Pages 344
ISBN 9780806188300
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The town of White Oaks, New Mexico Territory, was born in 1879 when prospectors discovered gold at nearby Baxter Mountain. In Gold-Mining Boomtown, Roberta Key Haldane offers an intimate portrait of the southeastern New Mexico community by profiling more than forty families and individuals who made their homes there during its heyday. Today, fewer than a hundred people live in White Oaks. Its frontier incarnation, located a scant twenty-eight miles from the notorious Lincoln, is remembered largely because of its association with famous westerners. Billy the Kid and his gang were familiar visitors to the town. When a popular deputy was gunned down in 1880, the citizens resolved to rid their community of outlaws. Pat Garrett, running for sheriff of Lincoln County, was soon campaigning in White Oaks. But there was more to the town than gold mining and frontier violence. In addition to outlaws, lawmen, and miners, Haldane introduces readers to ranchers, doctors, saloonkeepers, and stagecoach owners. José Aguayo, a lawyer from an old Spanish family, defended Billy the Kid, survived the Lincoln County War, and moved to the White Oaks vicinity in 1890, where his family became famous for the goat cheese they sold to the town’s elite. Readers also meet a New England sea captain and his wife (a Samoan princess, no less), a black entrepreneur, Chinese miners, the “Cattle Queen of New Mexico,” and an undertaker with an international criminal past. The White Oaks that Haldane uncovers—and depicts with lively prose and more than 250 photographs—is a microcosm of the Old West in its diversity and evolution from mining camp to thriving burg to the near–ghost town it is today. Anyone interested in the history of the Southwest will enjoy this richly detailed account.

Hand Turned Tales by Jude Knight

Title Hand Turned Tales
Author Jude Knight
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2016-05-02
Category
Total Pages 156
ISBN 047334176X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A lady smuggler, an escaped slave, a maiden in a gold-mining boom town and a gothic story of a forced marriage and wicked relatives Hand-Turned Tales is designed so that readers can try Jude's story-telling before they buy her other books. Or, if you already like her books, enter her fictional world again in four different situations. In The Raven's Lady, Felix returns home in disguise after 13 years. He plans to catch a smuggler then take up his viscountcy. He does not expect the smuggler to be Joselyn, his childhood sweetheart. (Short story: 5,500 words) In Kidnapped to Freedom, Phoebe is stolen away from her plantation by a handsome masked pirate. (Short story: 5,100 words) All that Glisters is set in New Zealand in the 1860s, a time when gold miners poured into the fledgling settlement of Dunedin. Rose is unhappy in the household of her fanatical uncle. Thomas, a young merchant from Canada, offers a glimpse of another possible life. If she is brave enough to reach for it. (Short story: 13,000 words) The Prisoners of Wyvern Castle is a gothic historical romance set in the world of my novels and novella. Rupert has been imprisoned by his wicked sister, and forced to wed. His new wife, Madeline, has likewise been threatened into saying her vows. Forced into marriage, they find love, but can they find freedom before it is too late? The Prisoners of Wyvern Castle is a prequel to Revealed in Mist. (Novella: 23,500 words)

Title Porcupine Goldfields Ontario 1920 1935
Author Karen Bachmann
Publisher St. Catharines, ON : Looking Back Press
Release Date 2004
Category Gold mines and mining
Total Pages 128
ISBN 1550689363
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Paint Your Wagon by Clint Eastwood

Title Paint Your Wagon
Author Clint Eastwood
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2021
Category
Total Pages 10
ISBN OCLC:505323594
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The story of a gold mining boomtown full of brawny men centres on the work and play partnership of Ben and Pardner and the delicate wife they share.

Boom Town To Ghost Town by Richard Perske

Title Boom Town to Ghost Town
Author Richard Perske
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2015-05-01
Category Brush Creek (Colo.)
Total Pages 145
ISBN 069239382X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

GOLD! The one-word headline in the July 3, 1893 edition of the Fulford Signal newspaper summed up the very reason for the existence of this mining boom camp in the rugged mountains southeast of Eagle, Colorado. Although Fulford's booms were early and short-lived, interest in the one-time mining camp has continued for decades. Over the years, the stories of adventure and tragedy (including a tale of a lost gold mine) kept people intrigued. Author Richard Perske is the first writer to spend countless hours researching old newspapers and historical files to present the true story of Fulford.

Title Story of the California Gold Rush Coloring Book
Author Peter F. Copeland
Publisher Courier Corporation
Release Date 1988-12-01
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 48
ISBN 9780486258140
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Forty scenes: Sutter's Mill, mining camps and boomtowns, prospectors panning for gold, old San Francisco, more. Informative captions.

The California Gold Rush And The Klondike Gold Rush by Charles River Charles River Editors

Title The California Gold Rush and the Klondike Gold Rush
Author Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release Date 2018-02-05
Category
Total Pages 162
ISBN 198503008X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the gold rushes written by participants *Includes bibliographies for further reading *Includes a table of contents One of the most important and memorable events of the United States' westward push across the frontier came with the discovery of gold in the lands that became California in January 1848. Located thousands of miles away from the country's power centers on the east coast at the time, the announcement came a month before the Mexican-American War had ended, and among the very few Americans that were near the region at the time, many of them were Army soldiers who were participating in the war and garrisoned there. San Francisco was still best known for being a Spanish military and missionary outpost during the colonial era, and only a few hundred called it home. Mexico's independence, and its possession of those lands, had come only a generation earlier. Everything changed almost literally overnight. While the Mexican-American War technically concluded with a treaty in February 1848, the announcement brought an influx of an estimated 90,000 "Forty-Niners" to the region in 1849, hailing from other parts of America and even as far away as Asia. All told, an estimated 300,000 people would come to California over the next few years, as men dangerously trekked thousands of miles in hopes of making a fortune, and in a span of months, San Francisco's population exploded, making it one of the first mining boomtowns to truly spring up in the West. This was a pattern that would repeat itself across the West anytime a mineral discovery was made, from the Southwest and Tombstone to the Dakotas and Deadwood. Of course, that was made possible by the collective memory of the original California gold rush. Despite the mythology and the romantic portrayals that helped make the California Gold Rush, most of the individuals who came to make a fortune struck out instead. The gold rush was a boon to business interests, which ensured important infrastructure developments like the railroad and the construction of westward paths, but ultimately, it also meant that big business reaped most of the profits associated with mining the gold. While the Forty-Niners are often remembered for panning gold out of mountain streams, it required advanced mining technology for most to make a fortune. As historian H.W. Brands said of the impact the gold rush had on Americans at the time, "The old American Dream ... was the dream of the Puritans, of Benjamin Franklin's 'Poor Richard'... of men and women content to accumulate their modest fortunes a little at a time, year by year by year. The new dream was the dream of instant wealth, won in a twinkling by audacity and good luck... [it] became a prominent part of the American psyche only after Sutter's Mill." While the gold rush may not have made every Forty-Niner rich, the events still continue to influence the country's collective mentality. When gold was discovered in the Yukon and Alaska almost 50 years after the rush in California, it drew tens of thousands of prospectors despite the unforgiving climate. Mineral resources had gone a long way in the United States acquiring Alaska a generation earlier, but the lack of transportation kept all but the most dedicated from venturing into the Yukon and Alaska until the announcement of the gold rush. For a few years, the attention turned to the Northwest, and thanks to vivid descriptions by writers like Jack London, the nation became intrigued with the idea of miners toughing out the winter conditions to find hidden gold. Of course, despite the mythology and the romantic portrayals that helped make the Klondike Gold Rush, most of the individuals who came to make a fortune struck out instead.

Title The Gold Rush in California
Author Elaine Landau
Publisher Enslow Publishing, LLC
Release Date 2014-12-15
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 48
ISBN 9780766063013
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

YOU are a New Englander with a bad case of gold fever. Gold has been discovered in California, and you want to go claim some for yourself. Will you strike it rich? On January 24, 1848, a man working near Sutter’s Mill in California spotted a few small gold nuggets in the American River. This discovery led thousands of people to move to the west. However, looking for gold proved to be dangerous work. Author Elaine Landau poses many other exciting questions to the reader in this engaging narrative.

Title Historical Archaeology of the Big Five Gold Mine
Author Michael S. Burney
Publisher LAP Lambert Academic Publishing
Release Date 2014-04
Category Archaeology
Total Pages 220
ISBN 3659513237
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

As early as 1866, a gold rush high in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of northern New Mexico lured men, and a few women, to seek their fortunes in a remote landscape as rugged as it was breathtakingly beautiful. This northern territory of New Spain had long ago been gifted to a chosen few through Spanish and Mexican land grants encompassing vast portions of northern New Mexico. Predominantly inhabited by Jicarilla Apaches, Utes, Pueblo Indians, and Hispanic settlers, the high-mountain valleys around the small Anglo community of Red River north of Taos would evolve into a Wild West mining boomtown of the American Southwest. Bitter Creek was one of the narrow, heavily forested valleys above Red River in the Red River gold-mining district. The "Big Five" was one of several mines. Thought to have yielded a rich bounty of gold as early as 1858, the Big Five was prospected in 1890 with poor results. In 1921, however, it became a working gold mine employing a waterwheel power plant. The miners, mining technology, crude living conditions, and domestic and industrial artifacts are resurrected through historical written records and archaeological excavations undertaken above 10,000 feet.

Bodie Boom Town Gold Town by Douglas McDonald

Title Bodie Boom Town Gold Town
Author Douglas McDonald
Publisher Gem Guides Book Company
Release Date 1988
Category History
Total Pages 47
ISBN 0913814881
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Story of the last of California's old-time mining camps, now a state historic park. Includes visitor info. and many historic photos.

Beautiful Mine by Chris Enss

Title Beautiful Mine
Author Chris Enss
Publisher Rowman & Littlefield
Release Date 2008-07-17
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 160
ISBN 9781461746812
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

During the gold rush, women worked alongside men panning and digging for gold and silver in the mountains of Colorado, California, and all the way up to Alaska. While many books have been written about the frontier women who ran brothels and boarding houses in mining towns, none have told the true stories of ladies who labored as hard as men out in the mines. A wonderful collection of true Americana, this book includes archival photographs of lady miners as well as the mines and boomtowns.

Fort Steele by Naomi Miller

Title Fort Steele
Author Naomi Miller
Publisher Heritage House Publishing Co
Release Date 2002
Category History
Total Pages 240
ISBN 1894384385
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Fort Steele began in 1864 as the site of John Galbraith's ferry, which transported eager gold seekers across the Kootenay River to nearby Wild Horse Creek. Major Sam Steele's "D" Division of the North West Mounted Police built Kootenay Post here in 1887 and helped alleviate tensions between white settlers and the Native Ktunaxa people. With all disputes settled peacefully and Steele recalled to Alberta to take on a new challenge, the appreciative residents renamed the town in 1888 to honour the highly regarded Mountie. As more settlers came, trails became roads. In summer, riverboats ran north and south to link with railways. Government offices made Fort Steele the administrative centre for East Kootenay. A bustling business community developed, and a newspaper was born. A school, three churches, an Opera House, and a hospital soon followed. Fort Steele boomed until the BC Southern Railway bypassed it. Naomi Miller, a local resident and interpreter at Fort Steele Heritage Town, provides many insights into the lives of the citizens of the town and district.

Title From Boom to Ghost Town
Author Thomas Cook
Publisher Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release Date 2018-06-27
Category
Total Pages 128
ISBN 1721229884
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Ghosts, miners, prostitutes, Chinese, Basques, outlaws, politicians, and yet more ghosts - the Wallowa Mountains gold-mining boomtown of Cornucopia in Oregon's wild northeast corner saw it all. Thomas Cook told the story of 'Copia's' gold mine in his first book, The Cornucopia. Now he describes the wide-open frontier town that the mine created, and the historic ruins that cry out for preservation." - William L. Sullivan, author of Hiking Oregon's History and over twenty other books.

Mammoth Gold by Gary Caldwell

Title Mammoth Gold
Author Gary Caldwell
Publisher Spellbinder Books
Release Date 1990
Category History
Total Pages 174
ISBN 0931378125
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Gold high on the eastern slope of the Sierra Nevada brought hundreds of miners racing to California's Lake Mining District & the boom town of Mammoth City. MAMMOTH GOLD describes four tumultuous years, when hopes leaped sky-high upon The Mammoth Mine's discovery in 1877, then fell abruptly when the 40-stamp mill shut down barely two years after it was built. Not content with merely chronicling events, Caldwell points out the significant differences between the 1850's placer-mining camps & later years' hard-rock camps & addresses two major questions. First, who were the gutsy men & women that cast their lot with this harsh, isolated mining camp? Where did they come from? How did they manage? Did they strike it rich? Second, why did The Mammoth Mining Company fail? Was it just bad luck? Or mismanagement? Highgrading? A stock scam? Exploring for answers, Caldwell combines a historian's obsession with accuracy with his love for the people who worked & died in Lake District. MAMMOTH GOLD continues Genny Smith Books' tradition of quality books - with lively writing, exceptional illustrations, solid research & handsome design.

Boom Town by Sonia Levitin

Title Boom Town
Author Sonia Levitin
Publisher Paw Prints
Release Date 2009-06-03
Category
Total Pages 40
ISBN 1442059400
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

After her family moves to California where her father goes to work in the gold fields, Amanda decides to make her own fortune baking pies and she encourages others to provide the necessary services--from a general store to a school--that enables her town to prosper.After her family moves to California where her father goes to work in the gold fields, Amanda decides to make her own fortune baking pies and she encourages others to provide the necessary services--from a general store to a school--that enables her townto prosper.

The Klondike Gold Rush by Charles River Charles River Editors

Title The Klondike Gold Rush
Author Charles River Charles River Editors
Publisher Createspace Independent Publishing Platform
Release Date 2017-01-11
Category
Total Pages 58
ISBN 1542467314
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

*Includes pictures *Includes accounts of the gold rush written by participants *Includes a bibliography for further reading *Includes a table of contents "Alaska is the land of the Nineteenth Century Argonauts; and the Golden Fleece hidden away among its snowcapped and glacier-clad mountains is not the pretty creation of mythological fame, but yellow nuggets which may be transformed into the coin of the realm. The vast territory into which these hardy soldiers of fortune penetrate is no less replete with wonders than the fabled land into which Jason is said to have led his band of adventurers. There is this difference, however, between the frozen land of the North and the fabled land of mythology. There is nothing conjectural about Alaska or its golden treasure. Jason led his band into an unknown country without the certain knowledge that the treasure he was seeking was there." - A.C. Harris, author of Alaska and the Klondike Gold Mines (1897) One of the most important and memorable events of the United States' westward push across the frontier came with the discovery of gold in the lands that became California in January 1848. Located thousands of miles away from the country's power centers on the East Coast at the time, the announcement came a month before the Mexican-American War had ended, but it brought an influx of an estimated 90,000 "Forty-Niners" to the region in 1849, hailing from other parts of America and even as far away as Asia. All told, an estimated 300,000 people would come to California over the next few years, as men dangerously trekked thousands of miles in hopes of making a fortune, and in a span of months, San Francisco's population exploded, making it one of the first mining boomtowns to truly spring up in the West. This was a pattern that would repeat itself across the West anytime a mineral discovery was made, from the Southwest and Tombstone to the Dakotas and Deadwood. Of course, it was all made possible by the collective memory of the original California gold rush; when gold was discovered in the Yukon and Alaska almost 50 years after the rush in California, it drew tens of thousands of prospectors despite the unforgiving climate. Mineral resources had gone a long way in the United States acquiring Alaska a generation earlier, but the lack of transportation kept all but the most dedicated from venturing into the Yukon and Alaska until the announcement of the gold rush. For a few years, the attention turned to the Northwest, and thanks to vivid descriptions by writers like Jack London, the nation became intrigued with the idea of miners toughing out the winter conditions to find hidden gold. Of course, despite the mythology and the romantic portrayals that helped make the Klondike Gold Rush, most of the individuals who came to make a fortune struck out instead. The gold rush was a boon to business interests, which ensured important infrastructure developments like the railroad and the construction of westward paths, but ultimately, it also meant that big business reaped most of the profits associated with mining the gold. While the miners are often remembered for panning gold out of mountain streams, it required advanced mining technology for most to make a fortune. Nevertheless, the Klondike Gold Rush and other gold rushes were emblematic of the American Dream and the notion that Americans could obtain untold fortunes regardless of their previous social status. As historian H.W. Brands put it, "The old American Dream ... was the dream of the Puritans, of Benjamin Franklin's 'Poor Richard'... of men and women content to accumulate their modest fortunes a little at a time, year by year by year. The new dream was the dream of instant wealth, won in a twinkling by audacity and good luck...." While the gold rush may not have made every miner rich, the events still continue to influence the country's collective mentality.

Oil Gas And Crime by Rick Ruddell

Title Oil Gas and Crime
Author Rick Ruddell
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2017-07-22
Category Social Science
Total Pages 276
ISBN 9781137587145
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book addresses the causes of rising crime rates resulting from the rapid population growth and industrialization associated with natural resource extraction in rural communities. Ruddell describes the social problems emerging in these boomtowns, including increases in antisocial behavior, as well as property-related and violent crime, industrial mishaps and traffic collisions. Many of the victims of these crimes are already members of vulnerable or marginalized groups, including rural women, Indigenous populations, and young people. The quality of life in boomtowns also decreases due to environmental impacts, including air, water and noise pollution. Law enforcement agencies, courts, and correction facilities in boomtowns are often overwhelmed by the growing demand as these places are seldom able to manage the population growth. The key questions addressed here are: who should pay the costs of managing these booms, and how can we prepare communities to mitigate the worst effects of this growth and development and, ultimately, increase the quality of life for boomtown residents. An in-depth and timely study, this original work will be of great interest to scholars of violent crime, criminal justice, and corporate harm.