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Title Gateway to Freedom The Hidden History of the Underground Railroad
Author Eric Foner
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2015-01-19
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780393244380
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom. More than any other scholar, Eric Foner has influenced our understanding of America's history. Now, making brilliant use of extraordinary evidence, the Pulitzer Prize–winning historian once again reconfigures the national saga of American slavery and freedom. A deeply entrenched institution, slavery lived on legally and commercially even in the northern states that had abolished it after the American Revolution. Slaves could be found in the streets of New York well after abolition, traveling with owners doing business with the city's major banks, merchants, and manufacturers. New York was also home to the North’s largest free black community, making it a magnet for fugitive slaves seeking refuge. Slave catchers and gangs of kidnappers roamed the city, seizing free blacks, often children, and sending them south to slavery. To protect fugitives and fight kidnappings, the city's free blacks worked with white abolitionists to organize the New York Vigilance Committee in 1835. In the 1840s vigilance committees proliferated throughout the North and began collaborating to dispatch fugitive slaves from the upper South, Washington, and Baltimore, through Philadelphia and New York, to Albany, Syracuse, and Canada. These networks of antislavery resistance, centered on New York City, became known as the underground railroad. Forced to operate in secrecy by hostile laws, courts, and politicians, the city’s underground-railroad agents helped more than 3,000 fugitive slaves reach freedom between 1830 and 1860. Until now, their stories have remained largely unknown, their significance little understood. Building on fresh evidence—including a detailed record of slave escapes secretly kept by Sydney Howard Gay, one of the key organizers in New York—Foner elevates the underground railroad from folklore to sweeping history. The story is inspiring—full of memorable characters making their first appearance on the historical stage—and significant—the controversy over fugitive slaves inflamed the sectional crisis of the 1850s. It eventually took a civil war to destroy American slavery, but here at last is the story of the courageous effort to fight slavery by "practical abolition," person by person, family by family.

Gateway To Freedom by Eric Foner

Title Gateway to Freedom
Author Eric Foner
Publisher W. W. Norton
Release Date 2015-01-19
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 0393244075
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the workings of the underground railroad in slave-dependent New York by three lesser-known heroes who coordinated with black dockworkers and counterparts in other states to help thousands of fugitive slaves between 1830 and 1860. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Fiery Trail.

Gateway To Freedom by DeWitt Professor of History Eric Foner

Title Gateway to Freedom
Author DeWitt Professor of History Eric Foner
Publisher W. W. Norton
Release Date 2016-01-18
Category
Total Pages 352
ISBN 0393352196
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The dramatic story of fugitive slaves and the antislavery activists who defied the law to help them reach freedom.

In Search Of Ancient Ireland by Carmel McCaffrey

Title In Search of Ancient Ireland
Author Carmel McCaffrey
Publisher Ivan R. Dee
Release Date 2003-06-11
Category History
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9781461655695
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This engaging book traces the history, archaeology, and legends of ancient Ireland from 9000 B.C., when nomadic hunter-gatherers appeared in Ireland at the end of the last Ice Age to 1167 A.D., when a Norman invasion brought the country under control of the English crown for the first time. So much of what people today accept as ancient Irish history—Celtic invaders from Euproe turning Ireland into a Celtic nation; St. Patrick driving the snakes from Ireland and converting its people to Christianity—is myth and legend with little basis in reality. The truth is more interesting. The Irish, as the authors show, are not even Celtic in an archaeological sense. And there were plenty of bishops in Ireland before a British missionary called Patrick arrived. But In Search of Ancient Ireland is not simply the story of events from long ago. Across Ireland today are festivals, places, and folk customs that provide a tangible link to events thousands of years past. The authors visit and describe many of these places and festivals, talking to a wide variety of historians, scholars, poets, and storytellers in the very settings where history happened. Thus the book is also a journey on the ground to uncover ten thousand years of Irish identity. In Search of Ancient Ireland is the official companion to the three-part PBS documentary series. With 14 black-and-white photos, 6 b&w illustrations, and 1 map.

Gateway To Freedom by Eric Foner

Title Gateway to Freedom
Author Eric Foner
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2015-02-26
Category Antislavery movements
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780198737902
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Eric Foner tells the story of how, between 1830 and 1860, three remarkable men from New York city - a journalist, a furniture polisher, and a black minister - led a secret network that helped no fewer than 3,000 fugitive slaves from the southern states of America to a new life of liberty in Canada.

Title Encyclopedia of the Underground Railroad
Author J. Blaine Hudson
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2015-01-09
Category History
Total Pages 316
ISBN 9781476602301
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Fugitive slaves were reported in the American colonies as early as the 1640s, and escapes escalated with the growth of slavery over the next 200 years. As the number of fugitives rose, the Southern states pressed for harsher legislation to prevent escapes. The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 criminalized any assistance, active or passive, to a runaway slave—yet it only encouraged the behavior it sought to prevent. Friends of the fugitive, whose previous assistance to runaways had been somewhat haphazard, increased their efforts at organization. By the onset of the Civil War in 1861, the Underground Railroad included members, defined stops, set escape routes and a code language. From the abolitionist movement to the Zionville Baptist Missionary Church, this encyclopedia focuses on the people, ideas, events and places associated with the interrelated histories of fugitive slaves, the African American struggle for equality and the American antislavery movement. Information is drawn from primary sources such as public records, document collections, slave autobiographies and antebellum newspapers.

Passages To Freedom by David Blight

Title Passages to Freedom
Author David Blight
Publisher Harper Paperbacks
Release Date 2006-01-24
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 006085118X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Few things have defined America as much as slavery. In the wake of emancipation the story of the Underground Railroad has become a seemingly irresistible part of American historical consciousness. This stirring drama is one Americans have needed to tell and retell and pass on to their children. But just how much of the Underground Railroad is real, how much legend and mythology, how much invention? Passages to Freedom sets out to answer this question and place it within the context of slavery, emancipation, and its aftermath. Published on the occasion of the opening of the National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, Passages to Freedom brings home the reality of slavery's destructiveness. This distinguished yet accessible volume offers a galvanizing look at how the brave journey out of slavery both haunts and inspires us today.

The Underground Railroad by William Still

Title The Underground Railroad
Author William Still
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1871
Category Antislavery movements
Total Pages 780
ISBN CHI:18174457
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in the Kentucky Borderland
Author J. Blaine Hudson
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2015-05-07
Category Social Science
Total Pages 215
ISBN 9781476604220
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Between 1783 and 1860, more than 100,000 enslaved African Americans escaped across the border between slave and free territory in search of freedom. Most of these escapes were unaided, but as the American anti-slavery movement became more militant after 1830, assisted escapes became more common. Help came from the Underground Railroad, which still stands as one of the most powerful and sustained multiracial human rights movements in world history. This work examines and interprets the available historical evidence about fugitive slaves and the Underground Railroad in Kentucky, the southernmost sections of the free states bordering Kentucky along the Ohio River, and, to a lesser extent, the slave states to the immediate south. Kentucky was central to the Underground Railroad because its northern boundary, the Ohio River, represented a three hundred mile boundary between slavery and nominal freedom. The book examines the landscape of Kentucky and the surrounding states; fugitive slaves before 1850, in the 1850s and during the Civil War; and their motivations and escape strategies and the risks involved with escape. The reasons why people broke law and social convention to befriend fugitive slaves, common escape routes, crossing points through Kentucky from Tennessee and points south, and specific individuals who provided assistance—all are topics covered.

South To Freedom by Alice L Baumgartner

Title South to Freedom
Author Alice L Baumgartner
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2020-11-10
Category History
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781541617773
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A brilliant and surprising account of the coming of the American Civil War, showing the crucial role of slaves who escaped to Mexico. The Underground Railroad to the North promised salvation to many American slaves before the Civil War. But thousands of people in the south-central United States escaped slavery not by heading north but by crossing the southern border into Mexico, where slavery was abolished in 1837. In South to Freedom, historianAlice L. Baumgartner tells the story of why Mexico abolished slavery and how its increasingly radical antislavery policies fueled the sectional crisis in the United States. Southerners hoped that annexing Texas and invading Mexico in the 1840s would stop runaways and secure slavery's future. Instead, the seizure of Alta California and Nuevo México upset the delicate political balance between free and slave states. This is a revelatory and essential new perspective on antebellum America and the causes of the Civil War.

Title The Underground Railroad and the Geography of Violence in Antebellum America
Author Robert H. Churchill
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2019-12-31
Category History
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781108489126
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A new interpretation of the Underground Railroad that places violence at the center of the story.

Armies Of Deliverance by Elizabeth R. Varon

Title Armies of Deliverance
Author Elizabeth R. Varon
Publisher Oxford University Press, USA
Release Date 2019
Category HISTORY
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9780190860608
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Loyal Americans marched off to war in 1861 not to conquer the South but to liberate it. In Armies of Deliverance, Elizabeth Varon offers both a sweeping narrative of the Civil War and a bold new interpretation of Union and Confederate war aims. Lincoln's Union coalition sought to deliver the South from slaveholder tyranny and deliver to it the blessings of modern civilization. Over the course of the war, supporters of black freedom built the case that slavery was the obstacle to national reunion and that emancipation would secure military victory and benefit Northern and Southern whites alike. To sustain their morale, Northerners played up evidence of white Southern Unionism, of antislavery progress in the slaveholding border states, and of disaffection among Confederates. But the Union's emphasis on Southern deliverance served, ironically, not only to galvanize loyal Amer icans but also to galvanize disloyal ones. Confederates, fighting to establish an independent slaveholding republic, scorned the Northern promise of liberation and argued that the emancipation of blacks was synonymous with the subjugation of the white South.

Making Freedom by R. J. M. Blackett

Title Making Freedom
Author R. J. M. Blackett
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2013-09-30
Category Social Science
Total Pages 136
ISBN 9781469608785
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, which mandated action to aid in the recovery of runaway slaves and denied fugitives legal rights if they were apprehended, quickly became a focal point in the debate over the future of slavery and the nature of the union. In Making Freedom, R. J. M. Blackett uses the experiences of escaped slaves and those who aided them to explore the inner workings of the Underground Railroad and the enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Law, while shedding light on the political effects of slave escape in southern states, border states, and the North. Blackett highlights the lives of those who escaped, the impact of the fugitive slave cases, and the extent to which slaves planning to escape were aided by free blacks, fellow slaves, and outsiders who went south to entice them to escape. Using these stories of particular individuals, moments, and communities, Blackett shows how slave flight shaped national politics as the South witnessed slavery beginning to collapse and the North experienced a threat to its freedom.

The Underground Railroad by Wilbur H. Siebert

Title The Underground Railroad
Author Wilbur H. Siebert
Publisher Antiquarius
Release Date 2020-10-24
Category
Total Pages 520
ISBN 1647983576
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Underground Railroad: From Slavery to Freedom is a comprehensive history of the subject. Professor Siebert's work discusses the origin and methods of the Railroad, its agents, maps, and the life of escapees in Canada. The text includes many illustrations, portraits, and maps

Force And Freedom by Kellie Carter Jackson

Title Force and Freedom
Author Kellie Carter Jackson
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020-08-12
Category
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780812224702
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In Force and Freedom, Kellie Carter Jackson provides the first historical analysis exclusively focused on the tactical use of violence among antebellum black activists. Through tactical violence, argues Carter Jackson, abolitionist leaders created the conditions that necessitated the Civil War.

Title Secret Lives of the Underground Railroad in New York City
Author Don Papson
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2015-01-28
Category History
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780786466658
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

During the fourteen years Sydney Howard Gay edited the American Anti-Slavery Society's National Anti-Slavery Standard in New York City, he worked with some of the most important Underground agents in the eastern United States, including Thomas Garrett, William Still and James Miller McKim. Gay's closest associate was Louis Napoleon, a free black man who played a major role in the James Kirk and Lemmon cases. For more than two years, Gay kept a record of the fugitives he and Napoleon aided. These never before published records are annotated in this book. Revealing how Gay was drawn into the bitter division between Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison, the work exposes the private opinions that divided abolitionists. It describes the network of black and white men and women who were vital links in the extensive Underground Railroad, conclusively confirming a daily reality.

Slavery S Exiles by Sylviane A. Diouf

Title Slavery s Exiles
Author Sylviane A. Diouf
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2016-03-01
Category History
Total Pages 403
ISBN 9780814760284
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Over more than two centuries men, women, and children escaped from slavery to make the Southern wilderness their home. They hid in the mountains of Virginia and the low swamps of South Carolina; they stayed in the neighborhood or paddled their way to secluded places; they buried themselves underground or built comfortable settlements. Known as maroons, they lived on their own or set up communities in swamps or other areas where they were not likely to be discovered. Although well-known, feared, celebrated or demonized at the time, the maroons whose stories are the subject of this book have been forgotten, overlooked by academic research that has focused on the Caribbean and Latin America. Who the American maroons were, what led them to choose this way of life over alternatives, what forms of marronage they created, what their individual and collective lives were like, how they organized themselves to survive, and how their particular story fits into the larger narrative of slave resistance are questions that this book seeks to answer. To survive, the American maroons reinvented themselves, defied slave society, enforced their own definition of freedom and dared create their own alternative to what the country had delineated as being black men and women’s proper place. Audacious, self-confident, autonomous, sometimes self-sufficient, always self-governing; their very existence was a repudiation of the basic tenets of slavery.

Slavery S Capitalism by Sven Beckert

Title Slavery s Capitalism
Author Sven Beckert
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2016-07-28
Category History
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780812293098
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

During the nineteenth century, the United States entered the ranks of the world's most advanced and dynamic economies. At the same time, the nation sustained an expansive and brutal system of human bondage. This was no mere coincidence. Slavery's Capitalism argues for slavery's centrality to the emergence of American capitalism in the decades between the Revolution and the Civil War. According to editors Sven Beckert and Seth Rockman, the issue is not whether slavery itself was or was not capitalist but, rather, the impossibility of understanding the nation's spectacular pattern of economic development without situating slavery front and center. American capitalism—renowned for its celebration of market competition, private property, and the self-made man—has its origins in an American slavery predicated on the abhorrent notion that human beings could be legally owned and compelled to work under force of violence. Drawing on the expertise of sixteen scholars who are at the forefront of rewriting the history of American economic development, Slavery's Capitalism identifies slavery as the primary force driving key innovations in entrepreneurship, finance, accounting, management, and political economy that are too often attributed to the so-called free market. Approaching the study of slavery as the originating catalyst for the Industrial Revolution and modern capitalism casts new light on American credit markets, practices of offshore investment, and understandings of human capital. Rather than seeing slavery as outside the institutional structures of capitalism, the essayists recover slavery's importance to the American economic past and prompt enduring questions about the relationship of market freedom to human freedom. Contributors: Edward E. Baptist, Sven Beckert, Daina Ramey Berry, Kathryn Boodry, Alfred L. Brophy, Stephen Chambers, Eric Kimball, John Majewski, Bonnie Martin, Seth Rockman, Daniel B. Rood, Caitlin Rosenthal, Joshua D. Rothman, Calvin Schermerhorn, Andrew Shankman, Craig Steven Wilder.

On Slavery S Border by Diane Mutti Burke

Title On Slavery s Border
Author Diane Mutti Burke
Publisher University of Georgia Press
Release Date 2010-12-01
Category History
Total Pages 368
ISBN 0820337366
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

On Slavery’s Border is a bottom-up examination of how slavery and slaveholding were influenced by both the geography and the scale of the slaveholding enterprise. Missouri’s strategic access to important waterways made it a key site at the periphery of the Atlantic world. By the time of statehood in 1821, people were moving there in large numbers, especially from the upper South, hoping to replicate the slave society they’d left behind. Diane Mutti Burke focuses on the Missouri counties located along the Mississippi and Missouri rivers to investigate small-scale slavery at the level of the household and neighborhood. She examines such topics as small slaveholders’ child-rearing and fiscal strategies, the economics of slavery, relations between slaves and owners, the challenges faced by slave families, sociability among enslaved and free Missourians within rural neighborhoods, and the disintegration of slavery during the Civil War. Mutti Burke argues that economic and social factors gave Missouri slavery an especially intimate quality. Owners directly oversaw their slaves and lived in close proximity with them, sometimes in the same building. White Missourians believed this made for a milder version of bondage. Some slaves, who expressed fear of being sold further south, seemed to agree. Mutti Burke reveals, however, that while small slaveholding created some advantages for slaves, it also made them more vulnerable to abuse and interference in their personal lives. In a region with easy access to the free states, the perception that slavery was threatened spawned white anxiety, which frequently led to violent reassertions of supremacy.

Title Slave Narratives of the Underground Railroad
Author Christine Rudisel
Publisher Courier Corporation
Release Date 2014-09-17
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780486780610
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Firsthand accounts of escapes from slavery in the American South include narratives by Frederick Douglass, Sojourner Truth, and Harriet Tubman as well as lesser-known travelers of the Underground Railroad.