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Title Free Black Communities and the Underground Railroad
Author Cheryl Janifer LaRoche
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 2013-12-30
Category Social Science
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780252095894
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This enlightening study employs the tools of archaeology to uncover a new historical perspective on the Underground Railroad. Unlike previous histories of the Underground Railroad, which have focused on frightened fugitive slaves and their benevolent abolitionist accomplices, Cheryl LaRoche focuses instead on free African American communities, the crucial help they provided to individuals fleeing slavery, and the terrain where those flights to freedom occurred. This study foregrounds several small, rural hamlets on the treacherous southern edge of the free North in Illinois, Indiana, and Ohio. LaRoche demonstrates how landscape features such as waterways, iron forges, and caves played a key role in the conduct and effectiveness of the Underground Railroad. Rich in oral histories, maps, memoirs, and archaeological investigations, this examination of the "geography of resistance" tells the new powerful and inspiring story of African Americans ensuring their own liberation in the midst of oppression.

The Underground Rail Road by William Still

Title The Underground Rail Road
Author William Still
Publisher Philadelphia : Porter & Coates
Release Date 1872
Category HISTORY
Total Pages 780
ISBN KBNL:KBNL03000311682
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Enjoy learning the vast history of the Underground Railroad through many different eyes in this book by William Still, the black abolitionist who is often called the "Father of the Underground Railroad" for his remarkable role in organizing its operation, as well as the multitude of people he helped to find freedom. Discover the many individual stories of the journey to freedom in this remarkable book.

Making Freedom by R. J. M. Blackett

Title Making Freedom
Author R. J. M. Blackett
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2013-09-30
Category Social Science
Total Pages 136
ISBN 9781469608785
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The 1850 Fugitive Slave Law, which mandated action to aid in the recovery of runaway slaves and denied fugitives legal rights if they were apprehended, quickly became a focal point in the debate over the future of slavery and the nature of the union. In Making Freedom, R. J. M. Blackett uses the experiences of escaped slaves and those who aided them to explore the inner workings of the Underground Railroad and the enforcement of the Fugitive Slave Law, while shedding light on the political effects of slave escape in southern states, border states, and the North. Blackett highlights the lives of those who escaped, the impact of the fugitive slave cases, and the extent to which slaves planning to escape were aided by free blacks, fellow slaves, and outsiders who went south to entice them to escape. Using these stories of particular individuals, moments, and communities, Blackett shows how slave flight shaped national politics as the South witnessed slavery beginning to collapse and the North experienced a threat to its freedom.

Gateway To Freedom by Eric Foner

Title Gateway to Freedom
Author Eric Foner
Publisher W. W. Norton
Release Date 2015-01-19
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 0393244075
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the workings of the underground railroad in slave-dependent New York by three lesser-known heroes who coordinated with black dockworkers and counterparts in other states to help thousands of fugitive slaves between 1830 and 1860. By the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Fiery Trail.

The Underground Railroad by Colson Whitehead

Title The Underground Railroad
Author Colson Whitehead
Publisher Anchor
Release Date 2018-01-30
Category Fiction
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9780345804327
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Originally published: New York: Doubledday, 2016.

Front Line Of Freedom by Keith P. Griffler

Title Front Line of Freedom
Author Keith P. Griffler
Publisher University Press of Kentucky
Release Date 2004-03-12
Category History
Total Pages 169
ISBN 0813122988
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Uses letters, reminiscences, and oral histories to examine the interracial enterprise known as the Underground Railroad and to explore the risks taken by daring and courageous African Americans and whites in the Ohio River Valley.

Stolen by Richard Bell

Title Stolen
Author Richard Bell
Publisher 37 Ink
Release Date 2020-12-01
Category History
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9781501169441
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This “superbly researched and engaging” (The Wall Street Journal) true story about five boys who were kidnapped in the North and smuggled into slavery in the Deep South—and their daring attempt to escape and bring their captors to justice belongs “alongside the work of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Edward P. Jones, and Toni Morrison” (Jane Kamensky, Professor of American History at Harvard University). Philadelphia, 1825: five young, free black boys fall into the clutches of the most fearsome gang of kidnappers and slavers in the United States. Lured onto a small ship with the promise of food and pay, they are instead met with blindfolds, ropes, and knives. Over four long months, their kidnappers drive them overland into the Cotton Kingdom to be sold as slaves. Determined to resist, the boys form a tight brotherhood as they struggle to free themselves and find their way home. Their ordeal—an odyssey that takes them from the Philadelphia waterfront to the marshes of Mississippi and then onward still—shines a glaring spotlight on the Reverse Underground Railroad, a black market network of human traffickers and slave traders who stole away thousands of legally free African Americans from their families in order to fuel slavery’s rapid expansion in the decades before the Civil War. “Rigorously researched, heartfelt, and dramatically concise, Bell’s investigation illuminates the role slavery played in the systemic inequalities that still confront Black Americans” (Booklist).

Scenes In The Life Of Harriet Tubman by Sarah Hopkins Bradford

Title Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman
Author Sarah Hopkins Bradford
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1869
Category African American women
Total Pages 132
ISBN NYPL:33433082332978
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Scenes in the Life of Harriet Tubman by Sarah Hopkins Bradford, first published in 1869, is a rare manuscript, the original residing in one of the great libraries of the world. This book is a reproduction of that original, which has been scanned and cleaned by state-of-the-art publishing tools for better readability and enhanced appreciation. Restoration Editors' mission is to bring long out of print manuscripts back to life. Some smudges, annotations or unclear text may still exist, due to permanent damage to the original work. We believe the literary significance of the text justifies offering this reproduction, allowing a new generation to appreciate it.

Runaway Slaves by John Hope Franklin

Title Runaway Slaves
Author John Hope Franklin
Publisher OUP USA
Release Date 2000-07-20
Category History
Total Pages 455
ISBN 0195084519
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Presents details about plantation life before the Civil War when slaves frequently rebelled against their masters and escaped

On The Edge Of Freedom by David G. Smith

Title On the Edge of Freedom
Author David G. Smith
Publisher Fordham Univ Press
Release Date 2014-12-15
Category History
Total Pages 344
ISBN 9780823263967
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In On the Edge of Freedom, David G. Smith breaks new ground by illuminating the unique development of antislavery sentiment in south central Pennsylvania—a border region of a border state with a complicated history of slavery, antislavery activism, and unequal freedom. During the antebellum decades every single fugitive slave escaping by land east of the Appalachian Mountains had to pass through the region, where they faced both significant opportunities and substantial risks. While the hundreds of fugitives traveling through south central Pennsylvania (defined as Adams, Franklin, and Cumberland counties) during this period were aided by an effective Underground Railroad, they also faced slave catchers and informers. “Underground” work such as helping fugitive slaves appealed to border antislavery activists who shied away from agitating for immediate abolition in a region with social, economic, and kinship ties to the South. And, as early antislavery protests met fierce resistance, area activists adopted a less confrontational approach, employing the more traditional political tools of the petition and legal action. Smith traces the victories of antislavery activists in south central Pennsylvania, including the achievement of a strong personal liberty law and the aggressive prosecution of kidnappers who seized innocent African Americans as fugitives. He also documents how their success provoked Southern retaliation and the passage of a strengthened Fugitive Slave Law in 1850. The Civil War then intensified the debate over fugitive slaves, as hundreds of escaping slaves, called “contrabands,” sought safety in the area, and scores were recaptured by the Confederate army during the Gettysburg campaign. On the Edge of Freedom explores in captivating detail the fugitive slave issue through fifty years of sectional conflict, war, and reconstruction in south central Pennsylvania and provocatively questions what was gained by the activists’ pragmatic approach of emphasizing fugitive slaves over immediate abolition and full equality. Smith argues that after the war, social and demographic changes in southern Pennsylvania worked against African Americans’ achieving equal opportunity, and although local literature portrayed this area as a vanguard of the Underground Railroad, African Americans still lived “on the edge of freedom.” By the 1920s, the Ku Klux Klan was rallying near the Gettysburg battlefield, and south central Pennsylvania became, in some ways, as segregated as the Jim Crow South. The fugitive slave issue, by reinforcing images of dependency, may have actually worked against the achievement of lasting social change.

Title The Underground Railroad from Slavery to Freedom
Author Wilbur Henry Siebert
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1898
Category Fugitive slaves
Total Pages 478
ISBN MINN:31951D02545833G
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title The Underground Railroad A Reference Guide
Author Kerry Walters
Publisher ABC-CLIO
Release Date 2012-03-09
Category History
Total Pages 223
ISBN 9781598846485
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Full of true stories more dramatic than any fiction, The Underground Railroad: A Reference Guide offers a fresh, revealing look at the efforts of hundreds of dedicated persons—white and black, men and women, from all walks of life—to help slave fugitives find freedom in the decades leading up to the Civil War. • Original documents, from key legislation like The Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 to first-person narratives of escaping slaves • Biographical sketches of key figures involved in the Underground Railroad, including Levi Coffin, William Lloyd Garrison, Robert Purvis, and Mary Ann Shadd

Title INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL
Author Harriet Jacobs
Publisher e-artnow
Release Date 2017-10-06
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 231
ISBN 9788027221400
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" was one of the first books to address the struggle for freedom by female slaves; explore their struggles with sexual harassment and abuse; and their effort to protect their roles as women and mothers. After being overshadowed by the Civil War, the novel was rediscovered in the late 20th century and since then hasn't been out of print ever. It is one of the seminal books written on the theme of slavery from a woman's point of view and appreciated worldwide academically as well. Excerpt: "Reader be assured this narrative is no fiction. I am aware that some of my adventures may seem incredible; but they are, nevertheless, strictly true. I have not exaggerated the wrongs inflicted by Slavery; on the contrary, my descriptions fall far short of the facts. I have concealed the names of places, and given persons fictitious names. I had no motive for secrecy on my own account, but I deemed it kind and considerate towards others to pursue this course...." Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897) was an African-American writer who was formerly a fugitive slave. To save her family and her own identity from being found out, she used the pseudonym of Linda Brent and wrote secretly during the night.

Title The Underground Railroad and the Geography of Violence in Antebellum America
Author Robert H. Churchill
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2019-12-31
Category History
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9781108489126
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A new interpretation of the Underground Railroad that places violence at the center of the story.

Title Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad in the Kentucky Borderland
Author J. Blaine Hudson
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2015-05-07
Category Social Science
Total Pages 215
ISBN 9781476604220
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Between 1783 and 1860, more than 100,000 enslaved African Americans escaped across the border between slave and free territory in search of freedom. Most of these escapes were unaided, but as the American anti-slavery movement became more militant after 1830, assisted escapes became more common. Help came from the Underground Railroad, which still stands as one of the most powerful and sustained multiracial human rights movements in world history. This work examines and interprets the available historical evidence about fugitive slaves and the Underground Railroad in Kentucky, the southernmost sections of the free states bordering Kentucky along the Ohio River, and, to a lesser extent, the slave states to the immediate south. Kentucky was central to the Underground Railroad because its northern boundary, the Ohio River, represented a three hundred mile boundary between slavery and nominal freedom. The book examines the landscape of Kentucky and the surrounding states; fugitive slaves before 1850, in the 1850s and during the Civil War; and their motivations and escape strategies and the risks involved with escape. The reasons why people broke law and social convention to befriend fugitive slaves, common escape routes, crossing points through Kentucky from Tennessee and points south, and specific individuals who provided assistance—all are topics covered.

Title The Underground Railroad for Kids
Author Mary Kay Carson
Publisher Chicago Review Press
Release Date 2005-01-01
Category Education
Total Pages 164
ISBN 9781556525544
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An activity book portrays the heroic struggles of the thousands of slaves who sought freedom through the Underground Railroad, as well as the abolitionists, free blacks, and former slaves who helped them along the way.

The Liberty Line by Larry Gara

Title The Liberty Line
Author Larry Gara
Publisher University Press of Kentucky
Release Date 2013-03-25
Category History
Total Pages 216
ISBN 9780813143569
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

" The underground railroad -- with its mysterious signals, secret depots, abolitionist heroes, and slave-hunting villains -- has become part of American mythology. But legend has distorted much of this history. Larry Gara shows how pre-Civil War partisan propanda, postwar remininscences by fame-hungry abolitionists, and oral tradition helped foster the popular belief that a powerful secret organization spirited floods of slaves away from the South. In contrast to much popular belief, however, the slaves themselves had active roles in their own escape. They carried out their runs, receiving aid only after they had reached territory where they still faced return. The Liberty Line puts slaves in their rightful position: the center of their struggle for freedom.

Title The Underground Railroad in Floyd County Indiana
Author Pamela R. Peters
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2017-07-06
Category Social Science
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780786450626
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Floyd County, Indiana, and its county seat, New Albany, are located directly across the Ohio River from Louisville, Kentucky. Louisville was a major slave-trade center, and Indiana was a free state. Many slaves fled to Floyd County via the Underground Railroad, but their fight for freedom did not end once they reached Indiana. Sufficient information on slaves coming to and through this important area may be found in court records, newspaper stories, oral history accounts, and other materials that a full and fascinating history is possible, one detailing the struggles that runaway slaves faced in Floyd County, such as local, state, and federal laws working together to keep them from advancing socially, politically, and economically. This work also discusses the attitudes, people, and places that help in explaining the successes and heartaches of escaping slaves in Floyd County. Included are a number of freedom and manumission papers, which provided court certification of the freedom of former slaves.

A Fluid Frontier by Karolyn Smardz Frost

Title A Fluid Frontier
Author Karolyn Smardz Frost
Publisher Wayne State University Press
Release Date 2016-02-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 360
ISBN 9780814339602
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

As the major gateway into British North America for travelers on the Underground Railroad, the U.S./Canadian border along the Detroit River was a boundary that determined whether thousands of enslaved people of African descent could reach a place of freedom and opportunity. In A Fluid Frontier: Slavery, Resistance, and the Underground Railroad in the Detroit River Borderland, editors Karolyn Smardz Frost and Veta Smith Tucker explore the experiences of the area’s freedom-seekers and advocates, both black and white, against the backdrop of the social forces—legal, political, social, religious, and economic—that shaped the meaning of race and management of slavery on both sides of the river. In five parts, contributors trace the beginnings of and necessity for transnational abolitionist activism in this unique borderland, and the legal and political pressures, coupled with African Americans’ irrepressible quest for freedom, that led to the growth of the Underground Railroad. A Fluid Frontier details the founding of African Canadian settlements in the Detroit River region in the first decades of the nineteenth century with a focus on the strong and enduring bonds of family, faith, and resistance that formed between communities in Michigan and what is now Ontario. New scholarship offers unique insight into the early history of slavery and resistance in the region and describes individual journeys: the perilous crossing into Canada of sixteen-year-old Caroline Quarlls, who was enslaved by her own aunt and uncle; the escape of the Crosswhite family, who eluded slave catchers in Marshall, Michigan, with the help of others in the town; and the international crisis sparked by the escape of Lucie and Thornton Blackburn and others. With a foreword by David W. Blight, A Fluid Frontier is a truly bi-national collection, with contributors and editors evenly split between specialists in Canadian and American history, representing both community and academic historians. Scholars of the Underground Railroad as well as those in borderland studies will appreciate the interdisciplinary mix and unique contributions of this volume.

The Long Road Continues by Irene Moore Davis

Title The Long Road Continues
Author Irene Moore Davis
Publisher Biblioasis
Release Date 2019-07-16
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1771962631
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Windsor-Essex region, nestled directly across from Detroit, enjoys popular mythos on both sides of the border as a terminus of the Underground Railroad and a beacon of Canadian tolerance and freedom. But the truth is slavery was alive and well as late as the 19th century in Windsor, and the real-life narratives of enslaved peoples have been obscured by the myths. In this thought-provoking, page-turning history, historian Irene Moore Davis centers black voices to correct the previously imbalanced histories of this era, providing a complete and full telling of the black history of the region--from the first arrival of people of African descent up to the present day.