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Engaging Contradictions by Charles R. Hale

Title Engaging Contradictions
Author Charles R. Hale
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2008-05-07
Category Social Science
Total Pages 390
ISBN 9780520098619
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Scholars in many fields increasingly find themselves caught between the academy, with its demands for rigor and objectivity, and direct engagement in social activism. Some advocate on behalf of the communities they study; others incorporate the knowledge and leadership of their informants directly into the process of knowledge production. What ethical, political, and practical tensions arise in the course of such work? In this wide-ranging and multidisciplinary volume, leading scholar-activists map the terrain on which political engagement and academic rigor meet. Contributors: Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Edmund T. Gordon, Davydd Greenwood, Joy James, Peter Nien-chu Kiang, George Lipsitz, Samuel Martínez, Jennifer Bickham Mendez, Dani Nabudere, Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Jemima Pierre, Laura Pulido, Shannon Speed, Shirley Suet-ling Tang, João Vargas

Engaging Contradictions by Charles R. Hale

Title Engaging Contradictions
Author Charles R. Hale
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2008-05-07
Category Social Science
Total Pages 417
ISBN 9780520916173
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Scholars in many fields increasingly find themselves caught between the academy, with its demands for rigor and objectivity, and direct engagement in social activism. Some advocate on behalf of the communities they study; others incorporate the knowledge and leadership of their informants directly into the process of knowledge production. What ethical, political, and practical tensions arise in the course of such work? In this wide-ranging and multidisciplinary volume, leading scholar-activists map the terrain on which political engagement and academic rigor meet. Contributors: Ruth Wilson Gilmore, Edmund T. Gordon, Davydd Greenwood, Joy James, Peter Nien-chu Kiang, George Lipsitz, Samuel Martínez, Jennifer Bickham Mendez, Dani Nabudere, Jessica Gordon Nembhard, Jemima Pierre, Laura Pulido, Shannon Speed, Shirley Suet-ling Tang, João Vargas

Title Contradictions of Archaeological Theory
Author Sandra Wallace
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2012-01-30
Category Social Science
Total Pages 192
ISBN 9781136913082
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Is current archaeological theory stuck at an impasse? Sandra Wallace argues that archaeological theory has become mired as a result of logical and ontological contradictions. By showing that these contradictions are a result of common underlying philosophical assumptions and fallacies this book is able to show how a fresh approach to this discipline is necessary to resolve them, even if this requires re-examining some of the tenants of orthodox archaeology. This fresh approach is achieved by using Critical Realism as an "under labourer" to philosophically evaluate archaeological theory. Starting by assessing the historical impact of philosophy on the discipline and then looking at the current relationship between archaeology and the ontology of the material this book facilitates the construction of discipline specific theory by archaeologists. The result is an approach to archaeology that allows both students and practitioners to free themselves from endemic contradictions and re-discover their approach to archaeological theory.

Practicing Community Engagement by Victoria Ann Lowerson Bredow

Title Practicing Community Engagement
Author Victoria Ann Lowerson Bredow
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2015
Category
Total Pages 294
ISBN 1339528584
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This dissertation analyzes community engagement practices as a fundamental feature of democracy, planning, and policymaking processes. Multiple disciplines, including public policy, planning, and public health, understand community engagement as a mechanism to make planning, policymaking, and research processes and their outcomes more democratic, effective, and sustainable. Yet scholars, practitioners, and community residents continue to observe and experience difficulty collaborating in the design and implementation of policy. I investigated these conundrums of democracy, representation, governance, and collaboration through this dissertation, a four-year ethnographic study of community engagement in a foundation-funded neighborhood health initiative in Southern California.In this dissertation research, I inductively expand current understandings of exclusion and inclusion in planning and policymaking by enlisting practice theory as a theoretical and analytical lens. Practice theory entails both agency and structure; thus, it provides an alternative view to social phenomena, like community engagement, that are commonly studied using an agentic focus (e.g. practitioners need more training to be inclusive) or a structural analysis (e.g. practitioners have the decision-making power and thus exclusion persists). Using a practice lens, I define exclusion through a set of exclusionary practices, all of which prevent connections between different stakeholders, between their issues, and between current and preexisting advocacy and community organizing efforts. I also relate exclusion and inclusion to structural advantages and disadvantages, including the use and maintenance of common organizational and institutional practices in community settings. I describe structural advantages and disadvantages as practices that constitute community power dynamics. Specifically, I explain the relationship between power, defined as the ability to take action, and practices of exclusion and inclusion. I explore the rationale and implications of exclusionary and inclusionary practices by drawing from scholarship on institutional logics. I conclude that community engagement and planning and policymaking are ontologically nonlinear and emergent processes, and that empirical or practical approaches to community engagement must embrace nonlinearity and emergence in order to be inclusive.

The Contradictions by Sophie Yanow

Title The Contradictions
Author Sophie Yanow
Publisher Drawn & Quarterly
Release Date 2021-04-14
Category Comics & Graphic Novels
Total Pages 206
ISBN 9781770465114
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Eisner Award-winning story about a student figuring out radical politics in a messy world Sophie is young and queer and into feminist theory. She decides to study abroad, choosing Paris for no firm reason beyond liking French comics. Feeling a bit lonely and out of place, she’s desperate for community and a sense of belonging. She stumbles into what/who she’s looking for when she meets Zena. An anarchist student-activist committed to veganism and shoplifting, Zena offers Sophie a whole new political ideology that feels electric. Enamored—of Zena, of the idea of living more righteously—Sophie finds herself swept up in a whirlwind friendship that blows her even further from her rural California roots as they embark on a disastrous hitchhiking trip to Amsterdam and Berlin, full of couch surfing, drug tripping, and radical book fairs. Capturing that time in your life where you’re meeting new people and learning about the world—when everything feels vital and urgent—The Contradictions is Sophie Yanow’s fictionalized coming-of-age story. Sophie’s attempts at ideological purity are challenged time and again, putting into question the plausibility of a life of dogma in a world filled with contradictions. Keenly observed, frank, and very funny, The Contradictions speaks to a specific reality while also being incredibly relatable, reminding us that we are all imperfect people in an imperfect world.

Title Indigenous Studies and Engaged Anthropology
Author Professor Paul Sillitoe
Publisher Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.
Release Date 2015-01-28
Category Social Science
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781409445418
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Advancing the rising field of engaged or participatory anthropology that is emerging at the same time as increased opposition from Indigenous peoples to research, this book offers critical reflections on research approaches to-date. The engaged approach seeks to change the researcher-researched relationship fundamentally, to make methods more appropriate and beneficial to communities by involving them as participants in the entire process from choice of research topic onwards. The aim is not only to change power relationships, but also engage with non-academic audiences.

Both And by Ross Cunningham

Title Both And
Author Ross Cunningham
Publisher Christian Focus
Release Date 2021-01-08
Category Religion
Total Pages 168
ISBN 1527106373
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A visually engaging exploration of apparent contradictions within the Christian faith. One of the significant challenges in the Christian faith is the number of apparent contradictions the Bible presents. These paradoxes and mysteries can be difficult to understand. In Both-And Ross Cunningham takes 23 pairs of seemingly contradictory truths and concisely and clearly explains how they can co-exist. The book is divided into three main sections - apparent contradictions in the divine nature; apparent contradictions in the experience of salvation; and apparent contradiction in the characteristics of being in Christ. Ross Cunningham, who has a background in creative design, has introduced each chapter with an attractive graphic representation of the paradox in question.

Title Seeking the Beloved Community
Author Joy James
Publisher SUNY Press
Release Date 2013-05-09
Category Political Science
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781438446349
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Written over the course of 20 years, the essays in this volume highlight & analyse tensions confronted by writers, scholars, activists, politicians & political prisoners fighting racism & sexism.

Title The Contradictions of Pension Fund Capitalism
Author Kevin Skerrett
Publisher Lera Research Volume
Release Date 2018-01-15
Category Business & Economics
Total Pages 350
ISBN 0913447145
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

It is often hoped and assumed that union stewardship of pension investments will produce tangible and enduring benefits for workers and their communities while minimizing the negative effects of what are now global and intensely competitive capital markets. At the core of this book is a desire to question the proposition that workers and their organizations can exert meaningful control over pension funds in the context of current financial markets. The Contradictions of Pension Fund Capitalism is an engaging and readable text that will be of specific interest to members of the labor movement, pension activists, pension trustees, fund administrators, environmental activists, and employers/managers, as well as academics involved in pension or labor research. The contents and arguments of the book are applicable across the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, and Ireland, because these countries experience a similar macroeconomic context and face a similar pension landscape.

Title Feminist Theory in Practice and Process
Author Micheline R. Malson
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1989
Category Social Science
Total Pages 368
ISBN 0226502945
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A survey of recent major developments within feminist theory and analysis, this collection captures a period of transition in women's scholarship, from the examination of confining categories and constructs to the self-reflective development of feminist theory. The fourteen essays in this volume provide critical application of the practices of complicating gender, raising consciousness, engaging contradictions, transforming women's experiences, and naming the politics of theory.

A Grounded Identidad by Merida M. Rua

Title A Grounded Identidad
Author Merida M. Rua
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2015-08-01
Category History
Total Pages 264
ISBN 9780190257804
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Chicago is home to the third-largest concentration of Puerto Ricans in the United States, but scholarship on the city rarely accounts for their presence. This book is part of an effort to include Puerto Ricans in Chicago's history. Rúa traces Puerto Ricans' construction of identity in a narrative that begins in 1945, when a small group of University of Puerto Rico graduates earned scholarships to attend the University of Chicago and a private employment agency recruited Puerto Rican domestics and foundry workers. They arrived from an island colony where they had held U.S. citizenship and where most thought of themselves as "white." But in Chicago, Puerto Ricans were considered "colored" and their citizenship was second class. They seemed to share few of the rights other Chicagoans took for granted. In her analysis of the following six decades--during which Chicago witnessed urban renewal, loss of neighborhoods, emergence of multiracial coalitions, waves of protest movements, and everyday commemorations of death and life--Rúa explores the ways in which Puerto Ricans have negotiated their identity as Puerto Ricans, Latinos, and U.S. citizens. Through a variety of sources, including oral history interviews, ethnographic observation, archival research, and textual criticism, A Grounded Identidad attempts to redress this oversight of traditional scholarship on Chicago by presenting not only Puerto Ricans' reconstitution from colonial subjects to second-class citizens, but also by examining the implications of this political reality on the ways in which Puerto Ricans have been racially imagined and positioned in comparison to blacks, whites, and Mexicans over time.

Title Community based Archaeology
Author Sonya Atalay
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2012
Category Social Science
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780520273351
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Community Based Participatory Research in archaeology finally comes of age with Atalay's long-anticipated volume. She promotes a collaborative approach to knowledge gathering, interpretation, and use that benefits descendant communities and archaeological practitioners, contributing to a more relevant, rewarding, and responsible archaeology. This is essential reading for anyone who asks why we do archaeology, for whom, and how best can it be done." - George Nicholas, author of Being and Becoming Indigenous Archaeologists "Sonya Atalay shows archaeologists how the process of Community Based Participatory Research can move our efforts at collaboration with local communities beyond theory and good intentions to a sustainable practice. This is a game-changing book that every archaeologist must read." - Randall H. McGuire, author of Archaeology as Political Action

Transforming Archaeology by Sonya Atalay

Title Transforming Archaeology
Author Sonya Atalay
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2016-07-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 266
ISBN 9781315416519
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Archaeology for whom? The dozen well-known contributors to this innovative volume suggest nothing less than a transformation of the discipline into a service-oriented, community-based endeavor. They wish to replace the primacy of meeting academic demands with meeting the needs and values of those outside the field who may benefit most from our work. They insist that we employ both rigorous scientific methods and an equally rigorous critique of those practices to ensure that our work addresses real-world social, environmental, and political problems. A transformed archaeology requires both personal engagement and a new toolkit. Thus, in addition to the theoretical grounding and case materials from around the world, each contributor offers a personal statement of their goals and an outline of collaborative methods that can be adopted by other archaeologists.

Title Dialectic Rhetoric and Contrast The Infinite Middle of Meaning
Author Richard Boulton
Publisher Vernon Press
Release Date 2021-06-01
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9781648892653
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

By compiling an experimental method combining both dialectic and rhetoric, ‘Dialectic, Rhetoric and Contrast: The Infinite Middle of Meaning’ demonstrates how singular meanings can be rendered in a spectrum of 12 repeating concepts that are in a continuum, gradated and symmetrical. The ability to arrange meaning into this pattern opens enquiry into its ontology, and presents meaning as closer to the sensation of colours or musical notes than the bivalent oppositions depicted in classical logic. However, the experiment does not assert that this pattern suggests some sort of constant or absolute principle; instead, it theorises on the ways in which meaning can be considered to be recursive. To explain this, the book explores the concept of contrast itself. No exactitude on the precise existence of contrast can ever be struck because the answer varies infinitely depending upon the scale of measurement used to gauge the meeting point. This characteristic of contrast helps to define a whole new dimension from which sensation, meaning, cognition and consciousness can be analogised to the infinite forms between forms. At a time when the widest consensus in philosophy is the exhaustion of its central themes, the significance of such a hypothesis provides fresh impetus to revise some of the key meanings and concepts underpinning contemporary thought. To do this, the method explores the opposing themes of idealism and realism that run throughout western philosophy from Plato to the Speculative turn. This book will be of interest to professional academic audiences in the humanities and social sciences, from graduates to senior scholars. It will also be an interesting read to anyone wishing to keep abreast of developments in continental philosophy, epistemology, metaphysics, and the sociology of knowledge.

Title Southeast Asian Transformations
Author Sandra Kurfürst
Publisher transcript Verlag
Release Date 2020-07-31
Category Social Science
Total Pages 294
ISBN 9783839451717
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Southeast Asia is one of the most dynamic regions in the world. This volume offers a timely approach to Southeast Asian Studies, covering recent transitions in the realms of urbanism, rural development, politics, and media. While most of the contributions deal with the era of post-independence, some tackle the colonial period and the resulting developments. The volume also includes insights from Southern India. As a tribute to the interdisciplinary project of Southeast Asian Studies, this book brings together authors from disciplines as diverse as area studies, sociology, history, geography, and journalism.

Caring On The Clock by Mignon Duffy

Title Caring on the Clock
Author Mignon Duffy
Publisher Rutgers University Press
Release Date 2015-01-22
Category Social Science
Total Pages 350
ISBN 9780813572871
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A nurse inserts an I.V. A personal care attendant helps a quadriplegic bathe and get dressed. A nanny reads a bedtime story to soothe a child to sleep. Every day, workers like these provide critical support to some of the most vulnerable members of our society. Caring on the Clock provides a wealth of insight into these workers, who take care of our most fundamental needs, often at risk to their own economic and physical well-being. Caring on the Clock is the first book to bring together cutting-edge research on a wide range of paid care occupations, and to place the various fields within a comprehensive and comparative framework across occupational boundaries. The book includes twenty-two original essays by leading researchers across a range of disciplines—including sociology, psychology, social work, and public health. They examine the history of the paid care sector in America, reveal why paid-care work can be both personally fulfilling but also make workers vulnerable to burnout, emotional fatigue, physical injuries, and wage exploitation. Finally, the editors outline many innovative ideas for reform, including top-down and grassroots efforts to improve recognition, remuneration, and mobility for care workers. As America faces a series of challenges to providing care for its citizens, including the many aging baby boomers, this volume offers a wealth of information and insight for policymakers, scholars, advocates, and the general public.

Title The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology
Author Simon Coleman
Publisher Taylor & Francis
Release Date 2016-11-25
Category Social Science
Total Pages 530
ISBN 9781317590675
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology is an invaluable guide and major reference source for students and scholars alike, introducing its readers to key contemporary perspectives and approaches within the field. Written by an experienced international team of contributors, with an interdisciplinary range of essays, this collection provides a powerful overview of the transformations currently affecting anthropology. The volume both addresses the concerns of the discipline and comments on its construction through texts, classroom interactions, engagements with various publics, and changing relations with other academic subjects. Persuasively demonstrating that a number of key contemporary issues can be usefully analyzed through an anthropological lens, the contributors cover important topics such as globalization, law and politics, collaborative archaeology, economics, religion, citizenship and community, health, and the environment. The Routledge Companion to Contemporary Anthropology is a fascinating examination of this lively and constantly evolving discipline.

Kuxlejal Politics by Mariana Mora

Title Kuxlejal Politics
Author Mariana Mora
Publisher University of Texas Press
Release Date 2017-12-13
Category Social Science
Total Pages 296
ISBN 9781477314470
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Over the past two decades, Zapatista indigenous community members have asserted their autonomy and self-determination by using everyday practices as part of their struggle for lekil kuxlejal, a dignified collective life connected to a specific territory. This in-depth ethnography summarizes Mariana Mora's more than ten years of extended research and solidarity work in Chiapas, with Tseltal and Tojolabal community members helping to design and evaluate her fieldwork. The result of that collaboration—a work of activist anthropology—reveals how Zapatista kuxlejal (or life) politics unsettle key racialized effects of the Mexican neoliberal state. Through detailed narratives, thick descriptions, and testimonies, Kuxlejal Politics focuses on central spheres of Zapatista indigenous autonomy, particularly governing practices, agrarian reform, women's collective work, and the implementation of justice, as well as health and education projects. Mora situates the proposals, possibilities, and challenges associated with these decolonializing cultural politics in relation to the racialized restructuring that has characterized the Mexican state over the past twenty years. She demonstrates how, despite official multicultural policies designed to offset the historical exclusion of indigenous people, the Mexican state actually refueled racialized subordination through ostensibly color-blind policies, including neoliberal land reform and poverty alleviation programs. Mora's findings allow her to critically analyze the deeply complex and often contradictory ways in which the Zapatistas have reconceptualized the political and contested the ordering of Mexican society along lines of gender, race, ethnicity, and class.

Title The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South
Author Gautam Bhan
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2017-09-11
Category Architecture
Total Pages 396
ISBN 9781317392842
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The Routledge Companion to Planning in the Global South offers an edited collection on planning in parts of the world which, more often than not, are unrecognised or unmarked in mainstream planning texts. In doing so, its intention is not to fill a ‘gap’ that leaves this ‘mainstream’ unquestioned but to re-theorise planning from a deep understanding of ‘place’ as well as a commitment to recognise the diverse modes of practice that come within it. The chapters thus take the form not of generalised, ‘universal’ analyses and prescriptions, but instead are critical and located reflections in thinking about how to plan, act and intervene in highly complex city, regional and national contexts. Chapter authors in this Companion are not all planners, or are planners of very different kinds, and this diversity ensures a rich variety of insights, primarily based on cases, to emphasise the complexity of the world in which planning is expected to happen. The book is divided into a framing Introduction followed by five sections: planning and the state; economy and economic actors; new drivers of urban change; landscapes of citizenship; and planning pedagogy. This volume will be of interest to all those wanting to explore the complexities of planning practice and the need for new theories of knowledge from which to draw insight to face the challenges of the 21st century.

Making The Mexican Diabetic by Michael Montoya

Title Making the Mexican Diabetic
Author Michael Montoya
Publisher Univ of California Press
Release Date 2011-03-18
Category Social Science
Total Pages 282
ISBN 9780520949003
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This innovative ethnographic study animates the racial politics that underlie genomic research into type 2 diabetes, one of the most widespread chronic diseases and one that affects ethnic groups disproportionately. Michael J. Montoya follows blood donations from "Mexican-American" donors to laboratories that are searching out genetic contributions to diabetes. His analysis lays bare the politics and ethics of the research process, addressing the implicit contradiction of undertaking genetic research that reinscribes race’s importance even as it is being demonstrated to have little scientific validity. In placing DNA sampling, processing, data set sharing, and carefully crafted science into a broader social context, Making the Mexican Diabetic underscores the implications of geneticizing disease while illuminating the significance of type 2 diabetes research in American life.