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Title Commonwealth and the English Reformation
Author Ben Lowe
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2017-03-02
Category History
Total Pages 332
ISBN 9781351950381
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Whilst much recent research has dealt with the popular response to the religious change ushered in during the mid-Tudor period, this book focuses not just on the response to broad liturgical and doctrinal change, but also looks at how theological and reform messages could be utilized among local leaders and civic elites. It is this cohort that has often been neglected in previous efforts to ascertain the often elusive position of the common woman or man. Using the Vale of Gloucester as a case study, the book refocuses attention onto the concept of "commonwealth" and links it to a gradual, but long-standing dissatisfaction with local religious houses. It shows how monasteries, endowed initially out of the charitable impulses of elites, increasingly came to depend on lay stewards to remain viable. During the economic downturn of the mid-Tudor period, when urban and landed elites refocused their attention on restoring the commonwealth which they believed had broken down, they increasingly viewed the charity offered by religious houses as insufficient to meet the local needs. In such a climate the Protestant social gospel seemed to provide a valid alternative to which many people gravitated. Holding to scrutiny the revisionist revolution of the past twenty years, the book reopens debate and challenges conventional thinking about the ways the traditional church lost influence in the late middle ages, positing the idea that the problems with the religious houses were not just the creation of the reformers but had rather a long history. In so doing it offers a more complete picture of reform that goes beyond head-counting by looking at the political relationships and how they were affected by religious ideas to bring about change.

Title Reformation of the Commonwealth
Author Brian L. Hanson
Publisher Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht
Release Date 2019-09-16
Category Religion
Total Pages 250
ISBN 9783647554549
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This study considers sixteenth century evangelicals’ vision of a ›godly‹ commonwealth within the broader context of political, religious, social, and intellectual changes in Tudor England. Using the clergyman and bestselling author, Thomas Becon (1512–1567), as a case study, Brian L. Hanson argues that evangelical views of the commonwealth were situation-dependent rather than uniform, fluctuating from individual to individual. His study examines the ways commonwealth rhetoric was used by evangelicals and how that rhetoric developed and changed. While this study draws from English Reformation historiography by acknowledging the chronology of reform, it engages with interdisciplinary texts on poverty, gender, and the economy in order to demonstrate the intersection of commonwealth rhetoric with Renaissance humanism. Furthermore, the experience of exile and the languages of prophecy and companionship directly influenced commonwealth rhetoric and dictated the priorities, vocabulary, and political expression of the evangelicals. As sixteenth-century England vacillated in its religious direction and priorities, the evangelicals were faced with a political conundrum and the tension between obedience and ›lawful‹ disobedience. There was ultimately a fundamental disagreement on the nature and criteria of obedience. Hanson’s study makes a further contribution to the emerging conversation about English commonwealth politics by examining the important issues of obedience and disobedience within the evangelical community. A correct assessment of the issues surrounding the relationship between evangelicals and the commonwealth government will lead to a rediscovery of both the complexities of evangelical commonwealth rhetoric and the tension between the biblical command to submit to civil authorities and the injunction to ›obey God rather than man‹.

The English Confessors by Thomas Coleman

Title The English Confessors
Author Thomas Coleman
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1862
Category Dissenters, Religious
Total Pages 376
ISBN BCUL:VD2171351
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Richard Hooker and the English Reformation
Author W.J. Kirby
Publisher Springer Science & Business Media
Release Date 2013-03-14
Category Religion
Total Pages 339
ISBN 9789401703192
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This collection addresses the substance of Richard Hooker's achievement as a theologian and philosopher in the context of principal themes of English Reformation thought. Five principal loci of Reformation discourse are addressed: the relation between the "orders" of Grace and Nature; the doctrines of Providence and Predestination; the Church and the liturgy; sacramental theology; and the polemical cut-and-thrust of the late-Elizabethan context. It is of interest to scholars, seminarians, and students.

Title Church and Politics During the English Reformation
Author Jaretha Joy Jimena-Palmer
Publisher WestBow Press
Release Date 2017-11-29
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1973603446
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is a literary study of the seventeenth-century pamphlets and sermons delivered to the Long Parliament by Stephen Marshall, a leading English Puritan. Marshall was known as preacher to the Long Parliament and for his participation in the further reformation of the English Church in the 1640s. His understanding of the role of civil magistracy was deeply rooted in his concept of the ?English Reformation.? He was convinced that the constitutional changes during the sixteenth-century English Reformation defined the role of civil magistrates. The King became the ?Supreme Head of the English Church, ? and the civil magistracy consisting of ?King-or-Queen-in Parliament? had the responsibility to spearhead the reformation of the English Church. He also insisted that restoring godly preaching and teaching in every local church would eventually complete the English Reformation. Marshall also argued that the Henrician schism paved the way for England to become a ?Christian Commonwealth where the Church is lodged, ? whose characteristic was the unity among the people of God. This implied that in England, Presbyterians, Independents, and Erastians all belonged to one body of Jesus Christ, the ?Head of the Church.? In a Christian Commonwealth, civil magistracy was a divine institution and had the highest power of ordering and governing the church, according to Marshall. It was the civil magistracy's responsibility to protect and to take care of God's people in all godliness. And in order to do so, magistrates should be rightly informed from the Word of God. Though Marshall showed his opposition to King Charles I's political innovation that precipitated an unfortunate war in 1642, his vision of a Christian Commonwealth where English magistracy consisting of the ?King-or-Queen-in-Parliament? did not change. If the king could be persuaded to agree with the ecclesiastical reform Puritans proposed through Parliament, he would still be an instrument of reform.

Title English reformation to the fall of Poland
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1897
Category World history
Total Pages 86
ISBN WISC:89094631058
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Literature and Politics in the English Reformation
Author Tom Betteridge
Publisher Manchester University Press
Release Date 2004
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 253
ISBN 0719064600
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Literature and politics in the English Reformation is a study of the English Reformation as a political and literary event. Focusing on an eclectic group of texts, unified by their articulation of the key elements of the cultural history of the period 1510-80, the book unravels the political, poetic and religious themes of the era. --book jacket.

The Beginnings Of English Protestantism by Professor of the History of Christianity Alec Ryrie

Title The Beginnings of English Protestantism
Author Professor of the History of Christianity Alec Ryrie
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2002-05-30
Category History
Total Pages 242
ISBN 0521003245
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Table of contents

Title Studies on the English Reformation
Author John Williams
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1881
Category Reformation
Total Pages 227
ISBN UCAL:$B245524
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title The Dawn of the English Reformation
Author Henry Worsley
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1890
Category England
Total Pages 380
ISBN WISC:89097240451
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Title Utopia Carnival and Commonwealth in Renaissance England
Author Christopher Kendrick
Publisher University of Toronto Press
Release Date 2004-01-01
Category History
Total Pages 382
ISBN 0802089364
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

With the emergence of utopia as a cultural genre in the sixteenth century, a dual understanding of alternative societies, as either political or literary, took shape. In Utopia, Carnival, and Commonwealth in Renaissance England, Christopher Kendrick argues that the chief cultural-discursive conditions of this development are to be found in the practice of carnivalesque satire and in the attempt to construct a valid commonwealth ideology. Meanwhile, the enabling social-political condition of the new utopian writing is the existence of a social class of smallholders whose unevenly developed character prevents it from attaining political power equivalent to its social weight. In a detailed reading of Thomas More's Utopia, Kendrick argues that the uncanny dislocations, the incongruities and blank spots often remarked upon in Book II's description of Utopian society, amount to a way of discovering uneven development, and that the appeal of Utopian communism stems from its answering the desire of the smallholding class (in which are to be numbered European humanists) for unity and power. Subsequent chapters on Rabelais, Nashe, Marlowe, Bacon, Shakespeare, and others show how the utopian form engages with its two chief discursive preconditions, carnival and commonwealth ideologies, while reflecting the history of uneven development and the smallholding class. Utopia, Carnival, and Commonwealth in Renaissance England makes a novel case for the social and cultural significance of Renaissance utopian writing, and of the modern utopia in general.

Title Thomas Starkey and the Commonwealth
Author Thomas Mayer
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2002-08-22
Category History
Total Pages 328
ISBN 0521521289
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Thomas Starkey (c. 1495-1538) was the most Italianate Englishman of his generation. This book places Starkey into new and more appropriate contexts, both biographical and intellectual, taking him out of others in which he does not belong, from displaced Roundhead to follower of Marsilio of Padua. Beginning with his native Cheshire, it traces his career through Oxford, Padua, Paris, Avignon, Padua again, and finally England, where he spent the last four years of his life trying to fulfil his ambition to serve the commonweal. Most of Starkey's career revolved around his patron Reginald Pole, scion of the highest nobility, but Starkey (and many other Englishmen) managed to balance loyalty to Pole with allegiance to Henry VIII. Out of favour with the king's secretary after the middle of 1536, Starkey turned increasingly to religion, continuing to cling to his conciliarist and Italian Evangelical opinions until his death.

Title The Men and Women of the English Reformation
Author S.H. Burke
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1871
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN ONB:+Z226943805
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Covenant And Commonwealth by Daniel Judah Elazar

Title Covenant and Commonwealth
Author Daniel Judah Elazar
Publisher Transaction Publishers
Release Date 2020
Category Political Science
Total Pages 389
ISBN 1412820529
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The struggle in Europe to produce a Christian covenantal commonwealth, that climaxed in the Reformed Protestantism of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is the focus of this volume. It also examines Islam and other premodern polities that shape our present. "[W]ould make a rewarding text for a course on the history of European political thought." --George M. Gross, Review of Politics

Title Reader s Guide to Literature in English
Author Mark Hawkins-Dady
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2012-12-06
Category Reference
Total Pages 1010
ISBN 9781135314170
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Reader's Guide Literature in English provides expert guidance to, and critical analysis of, the vast number of books available within the subject of English literature, from Anglo-Saxon times to the current American, British and Commonwealth scene. It is designed to help students, teachers and librarians choose the most appropriate books for research and study.

Title A Brief History of the English Reformation
Author Derek Wilson
Publisher Robinson
Release Date 2012-06-21
Category History
Total Pages 160
ISBN 9781849018258
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Religion, politics and fear: how England was transformed by the Tudors. The English Reformation was a unique turning point in English history. Derek Wilson retells the story of how the Tudor monarchs transformed English religion and why it still matters today. Recent scholarly research has undermined the traditional view of the Reformation as an event that occurred solely amongst the elite. Wilson now shows that, although the transformation was political and had a huge impact on English identity, on England's relationships with its European neighbours and on the foundations of its empire, it was essentially a revolution from the ground up. By 1600, in just eighty years, England had become a radically different nation in which family, work and politics, as well as religion, were dramatically altered. Praise for Derek Wilson: 'Stimulating and authoritative.' John Guy. 'Masterly. [Wilson] has a deep understanding of . . . characters, reaching out across the centuries.' Sunday Times.

The English Reformation by Arthur Geoffrey Dickens

Title The English Reformation
Author Arthur Geoffrey Dickens
Publisher Penn State Press
Release Date 1991
Category Religion
Total Pages 461
ISBN 0271007982
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This book presents a new edition of the classic study of the religious changes that transformed England in the sixteenth century. Henry VIII officially brought the Protestant Reformation to England in the 1530s when he severed the English Church from the Papacy. But the seeds of the movement, according to A.G.Dickens, were planted much earlier. The English Reformation, first published in 1964, follows the movement from its late medieval origins through the settlement of Elizabeth I in 1559 and the rise of Puritanism.

Title Documents of the English Reformation 1526 1701
Author Gerald Lewis Bray
Publisher James Clarke & Co.
Release Date 2004
Category History
Total Pages 675
ISBN 0227172396
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The influence of the Book of Common Prayer and the King James version of the Bible created the modern English language, but there has been no collection of contemporary documents available to show how the momentous social and political changes took place. Gerald Bray's comprehensive collection covers the period from 1526 to 1700. The book contains many texts previously relatively inaccessible, along with others more widely known. The book also provides informative appendixes, including comparative tables of the different articles and confessions, showing their mutual relationships and dependence. Containing fifty-eight documents covering all the main Statutes, Injunctions and Orders, Prefaces to prayer books, Biblical translations and other relevant texts, Documents of the English Reformation is an invaluable resource for students, and a useful aide memoire for scholars in Theology, the English Church, and late medieval and early modern English history.