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Black Power Jewish Politics by Marc Dollinger

Title Black Power Jewish Politics
Author Marc Dollinger
Publisher Brandeis University Press
Release Date 2018-06-05
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781512602586
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Marc Dollinger charts the transformation of American Jewish political culture from the Cold War liberal consensus of the early postwar years to the rise and influence of Black Power-inspired ethnic nationalism. He shows how, in a period best known for the rise of black antisemitism and the breakdown of the black-Jewish alliance, black nationalists enabled Jewish activists to devise a new Judeo-centered political agenda - including the emancipation of Soviet Jews, the rise of Jewish day schools, the revitalization of worship services with gender-inclusive liturgy, and the birth of a new form of American Zionism. Undermining widely held beliefs about the black-Jewish alliance, Dollinger describes a new political consensus, based on identity politics, that drew blacks and Jews together and altered the course of American liberalism.

Black Power Jewish Politics by Marc Dollinger

Title Black Power Jewish Politics
Author Marc Dollinger
Publisher Brandeis Series in American Je
Release Date 2018
Category History
Total Pages 242
ISBN 1512602566
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Explores how American Jews leveraged the Black Power movement to strengthen American Jewish religious, ethnic, and cultural life"--Provided by the publisher.

Black Power Jewish Politics by Marc Dollinger

Title Black Power Jewish Politics
Author Marc Dollinger
Publisher Brandeis University Press
Release Date 2018
Category African Americans
Total Pages 242
ISBN 1512602574
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Explores how American Jews leveraged the Black Power movement to strengthen American Jewish religious, ethnic, and cultural life"--Provided by the publisher.

American Jewish History by Gary Phillip Zola

Title American Jewish History
Author Gary Phillip Zola
Publisher Brandeis University Press
Release Date 2014-11-04
Category Social Science
Total Pages 408
ISBN 9781611685107
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Presenting the American Jewish historical experience from its communal beginnings to the present through documents, photographs, and other illustrations, many of which have never before been published, this entirely new collection of source materials complements existing textbooks on American Jewish history with an organization and pedagogy that reflect the latest historiographical trends and the most creative teaching approaches. Ten chapters, organized chronologically, include source materials that highlight the major thematic questions of each era and tell many stories about what it was like to immigrate and acculturate to American life, practice different forms of Judaism, engage with the larger political, economic, and social cultures that surrounded American Jews, and offer assistance to Jews in need around the world. At the beginning of each chapter, the editors provide a brief historical overview highlighting some of the most important developments in both American and American Jewish history during that particular era. Source materials in the collection are preceded by short headnotes that orient readers to the documentsÕ historical context and significance.

What Went Wrong by Murray Friedman

Title What Went Wrong
Author Murray Friedman
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2007-09-11
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 424
ISBN 9781416576686
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From Selma to Crown Heights--what happened to the Black-Jewish civil rights alliance? Murray Friedman recounts for the first time the whole history of the Black-Jewish relationship in America, from colonial times to the present, and shows that this history is far more complex--and conflicted--than historians and revisionists admit.

Fight Against Fear by Clive Webb

Title Fight Against Fear
Author Clive Webb
Publisher University of Georgia Press
Release Date 2011-03-15
Category History
Total Pages 328
ISBN 9780820340098
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the uneasily shared history of Jews and blacks in America, the struggle for civil rights in the South may be the least understood episode. Fight against Fear is the first book to focus on Jews and African Americans in that remarkable place and time. Mindful of both communities' precarious and contradictory standings in the South, Clive Webb tells a complex story of resistance and complicity, conviction and apathy. Webb begins by ranging over the experiences of southern Jews up to the eve of the civil rights movement--from antebellum slaveowners to refugees who fled Hitler's Europe only to arrive in the Jim Crow South. He then shows how the historical burden of ambivalence between Jews and blacks weighed on such issues as school desegregation, the white massive resistance movement, and business boycotts and sit-ins. As many Jews grappled as never before with the ways they had become--and yet never could become--southerners, their empathy with African Americans translated into scattered, individual actions rather than any large-scale, organized alliance between the two groups. The reasons for this are clear, Webb says, once we get past the notion that the choices of the much larger, less conservative, and urban-centered Jewish populations of the North define those of all American Jews. To understand Jews in the South we must look at their particular circumstances: their small numbers and wide distribution, denominational rifts, and well-founded anxiety over defying racial and class customs set by the region's white Protestant majority. For better or worse, we continue to define the history of Jews and blacks in America by its flash points. By setting aside emotions and shallow perceptions, Fight against Fear takes a substantial step toward giving these two communities the more open and evenhanded consideration their shared experiences demand.

Title Blacks in the Jewish Mind
Author Seth Forman
Publisher NYU Press
Release Date 2000-10-01
Category History
Total Pages 284
ISBN 9780814726815
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"An excellent overview of the history of Jewish mysticism from its early beginnings to contemporary Hasidism...scholarly and complex." --Library Journal "An excellent work, clear and solidly documented by Joseph Dan on Gershom Scholem and on his work." --Notes Bibliographiques "An excellent guide to Scholem's work." --Christian Century

Black Power And Palestine by Michael R. Fischbach

Title Black Power and Palestine
Author Michael R. Fischbach
Publisher Stanford Studies in Comparative Race and Ethnicity
Release Date 2019
Category African American civil rights workers
Total Pages 278
ISBN 1503605450
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Black internationalism : Malcolm X and the rise of global solidarity -- The fire this time : SNCC, Jews, and the demise of the beloved community -- Reformers not revolutionaries : the NAACP, Bayard Rustin, and Israel -- Balanced and guarded : Martin Luther King, Jr. on the Arab-Israeli tightrope -- The power of words : the Black Arts movement and a new narrative -- Struggle and revolution : the Black Panthers and the guerrilla image -- Middle East symbiosis : Israelis, Arabs, and African-Americans -- Red, white, and black : communists, guerrillas, and the black mainstream -- A seat at the table : Andrew Young and black foreign policy -- Looking over Jordan : Joseph Lowery, Jesse Jackson, and Yasir Arafat

Troubling The Waters by Cheryl Lynn Greenberg

Title Troubling the Waters
Author Cheryl Lynn Greenberg
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2010-03-15
Category History
Total Pages 368
ISBN 1400827078
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Was there ever really a black-Jewish alliance in twentieth-century America? And if there was, what happened to it? In Troubling the Waters, Cheryl Greenberg answers these questions more definitively than they have ever been answered before, drawing the richest portrait yet of what was less an alliance than a tumultuous political engagement--but one that energized the civil rights revolution, shaped the agenda of liberalism, and affected the course of American politics as a whole. Drawing on extensive new research in the archives of organizations such as the NAACP and the Anti-Defamation League, Greenberg shows that a special black-Jewish political relationship did indeed exist, especially from the 1940s to the mid-1960s--its so-called "golden era"--and that this engagement galvanized and broadened the civil rights movement. But even during this heyday, she demonstrates, the black-Jewish relationship was anything but inevitable or untroubled. Rather, cooperation and conflict coexisted throughout, with tensions caused by economic clashes, ideological disagreements, Jewish racism, and black anti-Semitism, as well as differences in class and the intensity of discrimination faced by each group. These tensions make the rise of the relationship all the more surprising--and its decline easier to understand. Tracing the growth, peak, and deterioration of black-Jewish engagement over the course of the twentieth century, Greenberg shows that the history of this relationship is very much the history of American liberalism--neither as golden in its best years nor as absolute in its collapse as commonly thought.

Strangers In The Land by Eric J Sundquist

Title Strangers in the Land
Author Eric J Sundquist
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2009-06-30
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 672
ISBN 9780674044142
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The importance of blacks for Jews and Jews for blacks in conceiving of themselves as Americans, when both remained outsiders to the privileges of full citizenship, is a matter of voluminous but perplexing record. A monumental work of literary criticism and cultural history, Strangers in the Land draws upon politics, sociology, law, religion, and popular culture to illuminate a vital, highly conflicted interethnic partnership over the course of a century.

Title How Jews Became White Folks and what that Says about Race in America
Author Karen Brodkin
Publisher Rutgers University Press
Release Date 1998
Category History
Total Pages 243
ISBN 081352590X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Recounts how Jews assimilated into, and became accepted by, mainstream white society in the later twentieth century, as they lost their working-class orientation

Black Power by Charles V. Hamilton

Title Black Power
Author Charles V. Hamilton
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2011-06-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780307795274
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A revolutionary work since its publication, Black Power exposed the depths of systemic racism in this country and provided a radical political framework for reform: true and lasting social change would only be accomplished through unity among African-Americans and their independence from the preexisting order. An eloquent document of the civil rights movement that remains a work of profound social relevance 50 years after it was first published.

Title Struggles in the Promised Land
Author Jack Salzman
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 1997-03-20
Category History
Total Pages 448
ISBN 9780198024927
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Recent flashpoints in Black-Jewish relations--Louis Farrakhan's Million Man March, the violence in Crown Heights, Leonard Jeffries' polemical speeches, the O.J. Simpson verdict, and the contentious responses to these events--suggest just how wide the gap has become in the fragile coalition that was formed during the Civil Rights movement of the 1960s. Instead of critical dialogue and respectful exchange, we have witnessed battles that too often consist of vulgar name-calling and self-righteous finger-pointing. Absent from these exchanges are two vitally important and potentially healing elements: Comprehension of the actual history between Blacks and Jews, and level-headed discussion of the many issues that currently divide the two groups. In Struggles in the Promised Land, editors Jack Salzman and Cornel West bring together twenty-one illuminating essays that fill precisely this absence. As Salzman makes clear in his introduction, the purpose of this collection is not to offer quick fixes to the present crisis but to provide a clarifying historical framework from which lasting solutions may emerge. Where historical knowledge is lacking, rhetoric comes rushing in, and Salzman asserts that the true history of Black-Jewish relations remains largely untold. To communicate that history, the essays gathered here move from the common demonization of Blacks and Jews in the Middle Ages; to an accurate assessment of Jewish involvement of the slave trade; to the confluence of Black migration from the South and Jewish immigration from Europe into Northern cities between 1880 and 1935; to the meaningful alliance forged during the Civil Rights movement and the conflicts over Black Power and the struggle in the Middle East that effectively ended that alliance. The essays also provide reasoned discussion of such volatile issues as affirmative action, Zionism, Blacks and Jews in the American Left, educational relations between the two groups, and the real and perceived roles Hollywood has play in the current tensions. The book concludes with personal pieces by Patricia Williams, Letty Cottin Pogrebin, Michael Walzer, and Cornel West, who argues that the need to promote Black-Jewish alliances is, above all, a "moral endeavor that exemplifies ways in which the most hated group in European history and the most hated group in U.S. history can coalesce in the name of precious democratic ideals." At a time when accusations come more readily than careful consideration, Struggles in the Promised Land offers a much-needed voice of reason and historical understanding. Distinguished by the caliber of its contributors, the inclusiveness of its focus, and the thoughtfulness of its writing, Salzman and West's book lays the groundwork for future discussions and will be essential reading for anyone interested in contemporary American culture and race relations.

From Black Power To Hip Hop by Patricia Hill Collins

Title From Black Power to Hip Hop
Author Patricia Hill Collins
Publisher Temple University Press
Release Date 2006-01-19
Category Social Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 1592137903
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A provocative analysis of the new contours of black nationalism and feminism in America.

Quest For Inclusion by Marc Dollinger

Title Quest for Inclusion
Author Marc Dollinger
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2000-07-23
Category History
Total Pages 296
ISBN 0691005095
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Few Jewish leaders, for example, condemned the wartime internment of Japanese Americans, and most southern Jews refused to join their northern co-religionists in public civil rights protests. When liberals advocated race-based affirmative action programs and busing to desegregate public schools, most Jews dissented.

The Price Of Whiteness by Eric L. Goldstein

Title The Price of Whiteness
Author Eric L. Goldstein
Publisher Princeton University Press
Release Date 2019-12-31
Category History
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9780691207285
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

What has it meant to be Jewish in a nation preoccupied with the categories of black and white? The Price of Whiteness documents the uneasy place Jews have held in America's racial culture since the late nineteenth century. The book traces Jews' often tumultuous encounter with race from the 1870s through World War II, when they became vested as part of America's white mainstream and abandoned the practice of describing themselves in racial terms. American Jewish history is often told as a story of quick and successful adaptation, but Goldstein demonstrates how the process of identifying as white Americans was an ambivalent one, filled with hard choices and conflicting emotions for Jewish immigrants and their children. Jews enjoyed a much greater level of social inclusion than African Americans, but their membership in white America was frequently made contingent on their conformity to prevailing racial mores and on the eradication of their perceived racial distinctiveness. While Jews consistently sought acceptance as whites, their tendency to express their own group bonds through the language of "race" led to deep misgivings about what was required of them. Today, despite the great success Jews enjoy in the United States, they still struggle with the constraints of America's black-white dichotomy. The Price of Whiteness concludes that while Jews' status as white has opened many doors for them, it has also placed limits on their ability to assert themselves as a group apart.

Black Jewish And Interracial by Katya Gibel Azoulay

Title Black Jewish and Interracial
Author Katya Gibel Azoulay
Publisher Duke University Press
Release Date 1997-10-13
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 219
ISBN 0822319713
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

DIVA study on being Black and Jewish in the United States. Author discusses bi-racialism and how and why African-Americans of Jewish descent identify themselves with other groups who have had a history of legal, political and racial discrimination, such as/div

Title The Foundations of American Jewish Liberalism
Author Kenneth D. Wald
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Release Date 2019-01-17
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781108497893
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Shows how American Jews developed a liberal political culture that has influenced their political priorities from the founding to today.

Title Power Powerlessness in Jewish History
Author David Biale
Publisher Schocken
Release Date 2010-12-22
Category History
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780307772534
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

To shed light on the tensions he observed between Jewish perceptions of power versus political realitieswhich "are often the cause of misguided political decisions," like Israel's Lebanese WarBiale analyzes Jewish history from the point of view of politics and power. The author of Gershom Scholem: Kabbalah and Counter-History here challenges the conventions of what he terms the Jewish "mythical past": the anachronistic interpretation that the Diaspora, which occurred between the fall of an independent Jewish commonwealth in A.D. 70 and the rebirth of the State of Israel in 1948, was politically impotent, and, conversely, that the First and Second Temple periods were eras of full Jewish national sovereignty.

Shared Dreams by Marc Schneier

Title Shared Dreams
Author Marc Schneier
Publisher Jewish Lights Publishing
Release Date 2008-10-01
Category History
Total Pages 222
ISBN 9781580232739
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Examines Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s efforts in support of the Jewish community and looks at the relations between Jewish and African-American communities.