Download Black Ohio And The Color Line 1860 1915 Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online Black Ohio And The Color Line 1860 1915 full books anytime and anywhere. Click download or read online button and get unlimited access by create free account.

Title Black Ohio and the Color Line 1860 1915
Author David A. Gerber
Publisher Urbana : University of Illinois Press
Release Date 1976
Category African Americans
Total Pages 500
ISBN UOM:39015003474429
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Title African Americans and the Color Line in Ohio 1915 1930
Author William Wayne Giffin
Publisher Ohio State University Press
Release Date 2005
Category History
Total Pages 312
ISBN 9780814210031
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Writing in true social history tradition, William W. Giffin presents a magisterial study of African Americans focusing on times that saw the culmination of trends that were fundamentally important in shaping the twentieth century. While many scholars have examined African Americans in the south and such large cities as New York and Chicago during this time, other important urban areas have been ignored. Ohio, with its large but very different urban centers-notably, Cleveland, Columbus, and Cincinnati-provides Giffin with the wealth of statistical data and qualitative material that he uses to argue that the "color line" in Ohio hardened during this time period as the Great Migration gained force. His data shows, too, that the color line varied according to urban area-it hardened progressively as one traveled South in the state. In addition, whereas previous studies have concentrated on activism at the national level through such groups as the NAACP, Giffin shows how African American men and women in Ohio constantly negotiated the color line on a local level, through both resistance and accommodation on a daily and very interpersonal level with whites, other blacks, and people of different ethnic, class, and racial backgrounds. This early grassroots resistance provided the groundwork for the Civil Rights movement that would gain momentum some twenty years later.

Title Richard L Davis and the Color Line in Ohio Coal
Author Frans H. Doppen
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2016-10-13
Category History
Total Pages 192
ISBN 9781476626673
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Born in Roanoke County, Virginia, on the eve of the Emancipation Proclamation, Richard L. Davis was an early mine labor organizer in Rendville, Ohio. One year after the 1884 Great Hocking Valley Coal Strike, which lasted nine months, Davis wrote the first of many letters to the National Labor Tribune and the United Mine Workers Journal. One of two African Americans at the founding convention of United Mine Workers of America in 1890, he served as a member of the National Executive Board in 1886–97. Davis called upon white and black miners to unite against wage slavery. This biography provides a detailed portrait of one of America’s more influential labor organizers.

Cutting Along The Color Line by Quincy T. Mills

Title Cutting Along the Color Line
Author Quincy T. Mills
Publisher University of Pennsylvania Press
Release Date 2013-10-24
Category History
Total Pages 319
ISBN 9780812245417
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Examines the history of black-owned barber shops in the United States, from pre-Civil War Era through today.

Title We Will Be Satisfied With Nothing Less
Author Hugh Davis
Publisher Cornell University Press
Release Date 2011-08-15
Category History
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9780801463648
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Historians have focused almost entirely on the attempt by southern African Americans to attain equal rights during Reconstruction. However, the northern states also witnessed a significant period of struggle during these years. Northern blacks vigorously protested laws establishing inequality in education, public accommodations, and political life and challenged the Republican Party to live up to its stated ideals. In "We Will Be Satisfied With Nothing Less," Hugh Davis concentrates on the two issues that African Americans in the North considered most essential: black male suffrage rights and equal access to the public schools. Davis connects the local and the national; he joins the specifics of campaigns in places such as Cincinnati, Detroit, and San Francisco with the work of the National Equal Rights League and its successor, the National Executive Committee of Colored Persons. The narrative moves forward from their launching of the equal rights movement in 1864 to the "end" of Reconstruction in the North two decades later. The struggle to gain male suffrage rights was the centerpiece of the movement’s agenda in the 1860s, while the school issue remained a major objective throughout the period. Following the ratification of the Fifteenth Amendment in 1870, northern blacks devoted considerable attention to assessing their place within the Republican Party and determining how they could most effectively employ the franchise to protect the rights of all citizens.

Title Through the Lens of Allen E Cole
Author Samuel W. Black
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2012
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 132
ISBN MINN:31951D035012059
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Chronicles the life and career of Allen E. Cole, an African American photographer from Cleveland, Ohio using his photographs of African Americans throughout Cleveland.

Title The Black Urban Community
Author G. Tate
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2019-06-12
Category History
Total Pages 486
ISBN 9781349735723
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book explores the many facets of black urban life from its genesis in the 18th century to the present time. With some historical background, the volume is primarily a contemporary critique, focusing on the major themes which have arisen and the challenges the confront African Americans as they create communities: political economy, religion and spirituality, health care, education, protest, and popular culture. The essays all examine the interplay between culture and politics, and the ways in which forms of cultural expression and political participation have changed over the past century to serve the needs of the black urban community. The collection closes with analysis of current struggles these communities face - joblessness, political discontent, frustrations with health care and urban schools - and the ways in which communities are responding to these challenges.

From Slavery To Freedom by John Hope Franklin

Title From Slavery to Freedom
Author John Hope Franklin
Publisher Alfred A. Knopf
Release Date 1988
Category African Americans
Total Pages 581
ISBN STANFORD:36105004478942
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The pre-eminent history of African-Americans is now available in two volumes. From slavery to Freedom charts the journey of African-Americans from their origins in the civilisations of Africa, through slavery in the Western Hemisphere, to their struggle for freedom in the West Indies, Latin America and the United States. Still featuring numerous primary and secondary source boxes, and even more richly illustrated than in previous editions, From Slavery to Freedom, 7/e maintains its status as one of the most important college textbooks in print.

Title Black Property Owners in the South 1790 1915
Author Loren Schweninger
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 1990
Category Social Science
Total Pages 426
ISBN 0252066340
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Property ownership has been a traditional means for African Americans to gain recognition and enter the mainstream of American life. This landmark study documents this significant, but often overlooked, aspect of the black experience from the late eighteenth century to World War I.

Black Judas by John David Smith

Title Black Judas
Author John David Smith
Publisher University of Georgia Press
Release Date 2019-11-15
Category History
Total Pages 436
ISBN 9780820356266
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

William Hannibal Thomas (1843-1935) served with distinction in the U.S. Colored Troops in the Civil War (in which he lost an arm) and was a preacher, teacher, lawyer, state legislator, and journalist following Appomattox. In many publications up through the 1890s, Thomas espoused a critical though optimistic black nationalist ideology. After his mid-twenties, however, Thomas began exhibiting a self-destructive personality, one that kept him in constant trouble with authorities and always on the run. His book The American Negro (1901) was his final self-destructive act. Attacking African Americans in gross and insulting language in this utterly pessimistic book, Thomas blamed them for the contemporary "Negro problem" and argued that the race required radical redemption based on improved "character," not changed "color." Vague in his recommendations, Thomas implied that blacks should model themselves after certain mulattoes, most notably William Hannibal Thomas. Black Judas is a biography of Thomas, a publishing history of The American Negro, and an analysis of that book's significance to American racial thought. The book is based on fifteen years of research, including research in postamputation trauma and psychoanalytic theory on selfhatred, to assess Thomas's metamorphosis from a constructive race critic to a black Negrophobe. John David Smith argues that his radical shift resulted from key emotional and physical traumas that mirrored Thomas's life history of exposure to white racism and intense physical pain.

The Black Laws by Stephen Middleton

Title The Black Laws
Author Stephen Middleton
Publisher Ohio University Press
Release Date 2005
Category Law
Total Pages 363
ISBN 9780821416235
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Beginning in 1803, and continuing for several decades, the Ohio legislature enacted what came to be known as the Black Laws. These laws instituted barriers to blacks entering the state and placed limits on black testimony against whites. Stephen Middleton tells the story of this racial oppression in Ohio and provides chilling episodes of how blacks asserted their freedom from the enactment of the Black Laws until the adoption of the Fourteenth Amendment. The fastest-growing state in antebellum America and the destination of whites from the north and the south, Ohio also became the destination for thousands of southern blacks, free and fugitive. Thus, nineteenth-century Ohio became a legal battleground for two powerful and far-reaching impulses in the history of race and law in America. One was the use of state power to further racial discrimination and the other was the thirst of African Americans, and their white allies, for equality under the law for all Americans. The state could never stop the steady stream of blacks crossing the Ohio River to freedom. In time, black and white leaders arose to challenge the laws and by 1849 the firewall built to separate the races began to collapse. The last vestiges of Ohio's Black Laws were repealed in a bill written by a black legislator in 1886. Written in a clear and compelling style, this path-breaking study of Ohio's early racial experience will be required reading for a broad audience of historians, legal scholars, students, and those interested in the struggle for civil rights in America.Stephen Middleton is a member of the history department at North Carolina State University. He is the author of Ohio and the Antislavery Activities of Salmon P. Chase, The Black Laws in the Old Northwest: A Documentary History, and Black Congressmen During Reconstruction: A Documentary Sourcebook.

Title Genealogical Research in Ohio
Author Kip Sperry
Publisher Genealogical Publishing Com
Release Date 2003
Category Reference
Total Pages 366
ISBN 0806317132
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

"This research guide describes Ohio sources for family history and genealogical research. It also includes extensive footnotes and bibliographies, addresses of repositories that house Ohio historical and genealogical records and oral histories, and addresses of chapters of the Ohio Genealogical Society. Valuable Ohio maps conclude this work ... This new edition describes many Ohio sources on the Internet and compact discs, as well as additional genealogical and historical sources and bibliographies of Ohio sources"--Preface.

Title Cultural Capital and Black Education
Author V.P. Franklin
Publisher IAP
Release Date 2004-12-01
Category Education
Total Pages 209
ISBN 9781607528425
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

A discussion of the contributions made by African Americans to public and private black schools in the USA in the 19th and 20th centuries. It suggests that cultural capital from African American communities may be important for closing the gap in the funding of black schools in the 21st century.

Arc Of Justice by Kevin Boyle

Title Arc of Justice
Author Kevin Boyle
Publisher Henry Holt and Company
Release Date 2007-04-01
Category History
Total Pages 432
ISBN 1429900164
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

An electrifying story of the sensational murder trial that divided a city and ignited the civil rights struggle In 1925, Detroit was a smoky swirl of jazz and speakeasies, assembly lines and fistfights. The advent of automobiles had brought workers from around the globe to compete for manufacturing jobs, and tensions often flared with the KKK in ascendance and violence rising. Ossian Sweet, a proud Negro doctor-grandson of a slave-had made the long climb from the ghetto to a home of his own in a previously all-white neighborhood. Yet just after his arrival, a mob gathered outside his house; suddenly, shots rang out: Sweet, or one of his defenders, had accidentally killed one of the whites threatening their lives and homes. And so it began-a chain of events that brought America's greatest attorney, Clarence Darrow, into the fray and transformed Sweet into a controversial symbol of equality. Historian Kevin Boyle weaves the police investigation and courtroom drama of Sweet's murder trial into an unforgettable tapestry of narrative history that documents the volatile America of the 1920s and movingly re-creates the Sweet family's journey from slavery through the Great Migration to the middle class. Ossian Sweet's story, so richly and poignantly captured here, is an epic tale of one man trapped by the battles of his era's changing times. Arc of Justice is the winner of the 2004 National Book Award for Nonfiction.

History News by Anonim

Title History News
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1978
Category United States
Total Pages 86
ISBN UOM:39015074916803
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

The Harvard Guide To African American History by Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham

Title The Harvard Guide to African American History
Author Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2001
Category Social Science
Total Pages 923
ISBN 0674002768
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Compiles information and interpretations on the past 500 years of African American history, containing essays on historical research aids, bibliographies, resources for womens' issues, and an accompanying CD-ROM providing bibliographical entries.

Title Religion and the Radical Republican Movement 1860 1870
Author Victor B. Howard
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1990
Category Religion
Total Pages 297
ISBN UOM:39015017960736
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

Title America s First Black Socialist
Author Nikki M. Taylor
Publisher University Press of Kentucky
Release Date 2012-12-01
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780813140780
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

In pursuit of his foremost goal, full and equal citizenship for African Americans, Peter Humphries Clark (1829--1925) defied easy classification. He was, at various times, the country's first black socialist, a loyal supporter of the Republican Party, and an advocate for the Democrats. A pioneer educational activist, Clark led the fight for African Americans' access to Ohio's public schools and became the first black principal in the state. He supported all-black schools and staunchly defended them even after the tide turned toward desegregation. As a politician, intellectual, educator, and activist, Clark was complex and enigmatic. Though Clark influenced a generation of abolitionists and civil rights activists, he is virtually forgotten today. America's First Black Socialist draws upon speeches, correspondence, and outside commentary to provide a balanced account of this neglected and misunderstood figure. Charting Clark's changing allegiances and ideologies from the antebellum era through the 1920s, this comprehensive biography illuminates the life and legacy of an important activist while also highlighting the black radical tradition that helped democratize America.

Title Before Obama A Reappraisal of Black Reconstruction Era Politicians 2 volumes
Author Matthew Lynch
Publisher ABC-CLIO
Release Date 2012-10-22
Category History
Total Pages 558
ISBN 9780313397929
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

This book introduces America to the Black Reconstruction politicians who fought valiantly for the civil rights of all people—important individuals who have been ignored by modern historians as well as their contemporaries.

Title A Survey of Cincinnati s Black Press Its Editors 1844 2010
Author Mae Najiyyah Duncan
Publisher Xlibris Corporation
Release Date 2011-03-16
Category Social Science
Total Pages 137
ISBN 1456844377
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK

Book Summary:

There is probably no better way to catch the flavor of a time period or of a people than by perusing the pages of contemporary periodicals. The problem is that very often newspapers, newsletters, and magazines are not saved and preserved as the precious historical record that they represent. This is doubly true of the ephemera of African-Americans in by-gone eras for a number of reasons. First of all, periodicals are intended at their inception to be for immediate consumption and not for posterity. Their own creators, the many editors and publishers referenced here, were probably too busy to worry about preserving their publications. Unlike artifacts or material goods, paper products are likely to disintegrate if not properly stored. And institutions, such as archives and libraries, where they might have been collected, tend to be white-dominated and not to value information pertaining to African-Americans until fairly recently. With the passage of time, the precious record of African-American life that is recorded in African-American publications is too often lost to later generations. Not only are the newspapers themselves often lost, but the memories of their impact disappear with each death of a community elder who remembers the personalities and issues involved. That is why Najiyyah Duncan’s work in researching the history of Cincinnati’s African-American newspapers is so important. Not only did Ms. Duncan scour local and national collections to determine where old Cincinnati newspapers were archived, but she also located individuals who had retained some precious copies privately. If she saw a citation for a Cincinnati newspaper in one of the few books published on the topic of African-American newspapers, she did everything within her power to try to locate extant copies. Then she scrutinized what was in the papers, recording information about founders, editors, dates of publication, mastheads, news stories, and typical contents, including businesses that advertised in the papers. By interviewing people who still remembered some of the earlier publications and the personalities behind them, Ms. Duncan supplements what she found in print. Although her main focus is on African-American newspapers published in Cincinnati, she also shares here what she found in the way of other types of local African-American publications as well as newspapers published elsewhere but circulated in Cincinnati. All of this is very important to anyone interested in how we got to where we are today in matters of culture and race. I know from personal experience while researching the life of Maurice McCrackin, a white minister who lived among African-Americans in Cincinnati’s West End and worked tirelessly to end racism and war, how important it is to have a balanced historical record to draw on. Such a record, however, is useful to far more than writers and historians. Anyone inspired to address today’s complex social inequities needs to know what has gone before. Furthermore, the record of any group should be articulated by members of that group rather than filtered and interpreted by the majority or dominant group. One of the first African-Americans to articulate the importance of this idea was John Brown Russwurm. In the first edition of the first African-American newspaper published in the United States, Freedom’s Journal in 1827, Russwurm wrote: “We wish to plead our own cause. Too long have others spoken for us. To long has the public been deceived by misrepresentations, in things which concern us dearly” (Quoted by Mary Sagarin in John Brown Russwurm: The Story of Freedom’s Journal, Freedom’s Journey. NY: Lothrop, Lee & Shepart, 1970, 57). Najiyyah Duncan has paid homage to Russwurm’s vision and a long history of self-articulation among African-American journalists by her efforts here in describing Cincinnati’s heritage o