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Black Indians by William Loren Katz

Title Black Indians
Author William Loren Katz
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2021
Category Juvenile Fiction
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9781439115435
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A Simon & Schuster eBook. Simon & Schuster has a great book for every reader.

Black Slaves Indian Masters by Barbara Krauthamer

Title Black Slaves Indian Masters
Author Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2013
Category Social Science
Total Pages 211
ISBN 9781469607108
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Black Slaves, Indian Masters: Slavery, Emancipation, and Citizenship in the Native American South

Black Indian by Shonda Buchanan

Title Black Indian
Author Shonda Buchanan
Publisher Wayne State University Press
Release Date 2019-08-26
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9780814345818
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A moving memoir exploring one family’s legacy of African Americans with American Indian roots.

Title Africans and Native Americans
Author Jack D. Forbes
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 1993-03
Category Social Science
Total Pages 344
ISBN 025206321X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This volume will revise the way we look at the modern populations of Latin America and North America by providing a totally new view of the history of Native American and African American peoples throughout the hemisphere. Africans and Native Americans explores key issues relating to the evolution of racial terminology and European colonialists' perceptions of color, analyzing the development of color classification systems and the specific evolution of key terms such as black, mulatto, and mestizo, which no longer carry their original meanings. Jack Forbes presents strong evidence that Native American and African contacts began in Europe, Africa, and the Caribbean and that Native Americans may have crossed the Atlantic long before Columbus.

Title Who s Afraid of Black Indians
Author Shonda Buchanan
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2012-09-01
Category African Americans
Total Pages 35
ISBN 0983641080
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Uncommon Defense by John W. Hall

Title Uncommon Defense
Author John W. Hall
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2010-01-30
Category History
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9780674053953
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the spring of 1832, when the Indian warrior Black Hawk and a thousand followers marched into Illinois to reoccupy lands earlier ceded to American settlers, the U.S. Army turned to rival tribes for military support. In order to grasp Indian motives, John Hall explores their alliances in earlier wars with colonial powers as well as in intertribal antagonisms and conflicts. Providing a rare view of Indian attitudes and strategies in war and peace, Hall deepens our understanding of Native Americans and the complex roles they played in the nation's history.

Title Untangling a Red White and Black Heritage
Author Darnella Davis
Publisher University of New Mexico Press
Release Date 2018-11-01
Category History
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9780826359803
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Examining the legacy of racial mixing in Indian Territory through the land and lives of two families, one of Cherokee Freedman descent and one of Muscogee Creek heritage, Darnella Davis’s memoir writes a new chapter in the history of racial mixing on the frontier. It is the only book-length account of the intersections between the three races in Indian Territory and Oklahoma written from the perspective of a tribal person and a freedman. The histories of these families, along with the starkly different federal policies that molded their destinies, offer a powerful corrective to the historical narrative. From the Allotment Period to the present, their claims of racial identity and land in Oklahoma reveal inequalities that still fester more than one hundred years later. Davis offers a provocative opportunity to unpack our current racial discourse and ask ourselves, “Who are ‘we’ really?”

West Indian Immigrants by Suzanne Model

Title West Indian Immigrants
Author Suzanne Model
Publisher Russell Sage Foundation
Release Date 2008-06-12
Category Social Science
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9781610444002
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

West Indian immigrants to the United States fare better than native-born African Americans on a wide array of economic measures, including labor force participation, earnings, and occupational prestige. Some researchers argue that the root of this difference lies in differing cultural attitudes toward work, while others maintain that white Americans favor West Indian blacks over African Americans, giving them an edge in the workforce. Still others hold that West Indians who emigrate to this country are more ambitious and talented than those they left behind. In West Indian Immigrants, sociologist Suzanne Model subjects these theories to close historical and empirical scrutiny to unravel the mystery of West Indian success. West Indian Immigrants draws on four decades of national census data, surveys of Caribbean emigrants around the world, and historical records dating back to the emergence of the slave trade. Model debunks the notion that growing up in an all-black society is an advantage by showing that immigrants from racially homogeneous and racially heterogeneous areas have identical economic outcomes. Weighing the evidence for white American favoritism, Model compares West Indian immigrants in New York, Toronto, London, and Amsterdam, and finds that, despite variation in the labor markets and ethnic composition of these cities, Caribbean immigrants in these four cities attain similar levels of economic success. Model also looks at "movers" and "stayers" from Barbados, Jamaica, Trinidad, and Guyana, and finds that emigrants leaving all four countries have more education and hold higher status jobs than those who remain. In this sense, West Indians immigrants are not so different from successful native-born African Americans who have moved within the U.S. to further their careers. Both West Indian immigrants and native-born African-American movers are the "best and the brightest"—they are more literate and hold better jobs than those who stay put. While political debates about the nature of black disadvantage in America have long fixated on West Indians' relatively favorable economic position, this crucial finding reveals a fundamental flaw in the argument that West Indian success is proof of native-born blacks' behavioral shortcomings. Proponents of this viewpoint have overlooked the critical role of immigrant self-selection. West Indian Immigrants is a sweeping historical narrative and definitive empirical analysis that promises to change the way we think about what it means to be a black American. Ultimately, Model shows that West Indians aren't a black success story at all—rather, they are an immigrant success story.

Caste by Isabel Wilkerson

Title Caste
Author Isabel Wilkerson
Publisher Penguin Random House
Release Date 2020
Category Social Science
Total Pages 496
ISBN 9780593230251
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - OPRAH'S BOOK CLUB PICK - The Pulitzer Prize-winning, bestselling author of The Warmth of Other Suns examines the unspoken caste system that has shaped America and shows how our lives today are still defined by a hierarchy of human divisions. "An instant American classic."--Dwight Garner, The New York Times "As we go about our daily lives, caste is the wordless usher in a darkened theater, flashlight cast down in the aisles, guiding us to our assigned seats for a performance. The hierarchy of caste is not about feelings or morality. It is about power--which groups have it and which do not." In this brilliant book, Isabel Wilkerson gives us a masterful portrait of an unseen phenomenon in America as she explores, through an immersive, deeply researched narrative and stories about real people, how America today and throughout its history has been shaped by a hidden caste system, a rigid hierarchy of human rankings. Beyond race, class, or other factors, there is a powerful caste system that influences people's lives and behavior and the nation's fate. Linking the caste systems of America, India, and Nazi Germany, Wilkerson explores eight pillars that underlie caste systems across civilizations, including divine will, bloodlines, stigma, and more. Using riveting stories about people--including Martin Luther King, Jr., baseball's Satchel Paige, a single father and his toddler son, Wilkerson herself, and many others--she shows the ways that the insidious undertow of caste is experienced every day. She documents how the Nazis studied the racial systems in America to plan their out-cast of the Jews; she discusses why the cruel logic of caste requires that there be a bottom rung for those in the middle to measure themselves against; she writes about the surprising health costs of caste, in depression and life expectancy, and the effects of this hierarchy on our culture and politics. Finally, she points forward to ways America can move beyond the artificial and destructive separations of human divisions, toward hope in our common humanity. Beautifully written, original, and revealing, Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents is an eye-opening story of people and history, and a reexamination of what lies under the surface of ordinary lives and of American life today.

Black Indians by Anonim

Title Black Indians
Author Anonim
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2012
Category History
Total Pages 208
ISBN 0689311966
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the history of relations between blacks and American Indians, and the existence of black Indians, from the earliest foreign landings through pioneer days.

Black Indians by William Loren Katz

Title Black Indians
Author William Loren Katz
Publisher Simon and Schuster
Release Date 2012-01-03
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 254
ISBN 9781442446373
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the history of relations between blacks and American Indians, and the existence of black Indians, from the earliest foreign landings through pioneer days.

Title The Black Indian in American Literature
Author K. Byars-Nichols
Publisher Springer
Release Date 2013-11-29
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 129
ISBN 9781137389183
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The first book-length study of the figure of the black Indian in American Literature, this project explores themes of nation, culture, and performativity. Moving from the Post-Independence period to the Contemporary era, Byars-Nichols re-centers a marginalized group challenges stereotypes and conventional ways of thinking about race and culture.

Black Slaves Indian Masters by Barbara Krauthamer

Title Black Slaves Indian Masters
Author Barbara Krauthamer
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2013-08-01
Category Social Science
Total Pages 232
ISBN 9781469607115
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From the late eighteenth century through the end of the Civil War, Choctaw and Chickasaw Indians bought, sold, and owned Africans and African Americans as slaves, a fact that persisted after the tribes' removal from the Deep South to Indian Territory. The tribes formulated racial and gender ideologies that justified this practice and marginalized free black people in the Indian nations well after the Civil War and slavery had ended. Through the end of the nineteenth century, ongoing conflicts among Choctaw, Chickasaw, and U.S. lawmakers left untold numbers of former slaves and their descendants in the two Indian nations without citizenship in either the Indian nations or the United States. In this groundbreaking study, Barbara Krauthamer rewrites the history of southern slavery, emancipation, race, and citizenship to reveal the centrality of Native American slaveholders and the black people they enslaved. Krauthamer's examination of slavery and emancipation highlights the ways Indian women's gender roles changed with the arrival of slavery and changed again after emancipation and reveals complex dynamics of race that shaped the lives of black people and Indians both before and after removal.

Title The House on Diamond Hill
Author Tiya Miles
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date 2010
Category History
Total Pages 315
ISBN 9780807834183
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Displaying pitch-perfect sensibility that weaves profound human empathy with piercing scholarly critique, Tiya Miles lays open the suffering: of all those who found themselves enmeshed in the world of Diamond Hill. At once monument and memorial, the Vann House is Cherokee, African, and American slavery writ large."--- I AMi: s F. brooks, author of Captives and Cousins: Shivery, kinship, and Community in the Southwest Borderlands "This is one of the most thoughtful, beautifully written works of history on any topic that I have read in a long while. Miles has taken a complex set of issues that have been long obscured by a desire for a romantic and guilt-free past, and with grace and sensitivity, has completely re-written history."--- Leslie M. Harris. Emory University A James Vann, a Cherokee and entrepreneur, established Diamond Hill, the most famous plantation in the southeastern Cherokee Nation. Tiya Miles tells the story of this plantations founding, its flourishing, its takeover by white land-lottery winners on the eve of the Cherokee Removal, its decay, and ultimately its renovation in the 1950s. Indeed, this is the first full-length study to reconstruct the history of the Diamond Hill plantation, a cosmopolitan hub of activity where more than one hundred slaves of African descent lived and labored, contributing significandy to the Vann family's famed wealth. This moving multiracial history sheds light on the various cultural communities that interacted within the plantation boundaries---from elite Cherokee slaveholders to Cherokee subsistence farmers, from black slaves of various ethnic backgrounds to free blacks from the North and South, from German-speaking Moravian missionaries to white southern skilled laborers. Moreover, the book paints rich portraits of the women of these various communities, including Peggy Scott Vann, mistress of Diamond Hill; Pleasant, an enslaved black woman owned by the Moravian Church; and Anna Rosina Gambold, a Moravian missionary diarist. Vividly written and extensively researched, this history illuminates gender, class, and cross-racial relationships on the southern frontier of present-day Georgia.

Title The Absolutely True Diary of a Part Time Indian
Author Sherman Alexie
Publisher Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Release Date 2012-01-10
Category Young Adult Fiction
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780316219303
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author's own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by Ellen Forney that reflect the character's art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live. With a forward by Markus Zusak, interviews with Sherman Alexie and Ellen Forney, and four-color interior art throughout, this edition is perfect for fans and collectors alike.

Black Indians by William Loren Katz

Title Black Indians
Author William Loren Katz
Publisher Turtleback
Release Date 1997-01-01
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 86
ISBN 0613015002
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Traces the history of relations between blacks and American Indians, and the existence of black Indians, from the earliest foreign landings through pioneer days.

Seeing Red by Mark Cronlund Anderson

Title Seeing Red
Author Mark Cronlund Anderson
Publisher Univ. of Manitoba Press
Release Date 2011-09-02
Category Social Science
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9780887554063
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The first book to examine the role of Canada’s newspapers in perpetuating the myth of Native inferiority. Seeing Red is a groundbreaking study of how Canadian English-language newspapers have portrayed Aboriginal peoples from 1869 to the present day. It assesses a wide range of publications on topics that include the sale of Rupert’s Land, the signing of Treaty 3, the North-West Rebellion and Louis Riel, the death of Pauline Johnson, the outing of Grey Owl, the discussions surrounding Bill C-31, the “Bended Elbow” standoff at Kenora, Ontario, and the Oka Crisis. The authors uncover overwhelming evidence that the colonial imaginary not only thrives, but dominates depictions of Aboriginal peoples in mainstream newspapers. The colonial constructs ingrained in the news media perpetuate an imagined Native inferiority that contributes significantly to the marginalization of Indigenous people in Canada. That such imagery persists to this day suggests strongly that our country lives in denial, failing to live up to its cultural mosaic boosterism.

Bind Us Apart by Nicholas Guyatt

Title Bind Us Apart
Author Nicholas Guyatt
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2016-04-26
Category History
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780465065615
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Why did the Founding Fathers fail to include blacks and Indians in their cherished proposition that “all men are created equal”? Racism is the usual answer. Yet Nicholas Guyatt argues in Bind Us Apart that white liberals from the founding to the Civil War were not confident racists, but tortured reformers conscious of the damage that racism would do to the nation. Many tried to build a multiracial America in the early nineteenth century, but ultimately adopted the belief that non-whites should create their own republics elsewhere: in an Indian state in the West, or a colony for free blacks in Liberia. Herein lie the origins of “separate but equal.” Essential reading for anyone hoping to understand today's racial tensions, Bind Us Apart reveals why racial justice in the United States continues to be an elusive goal: despite our best efforts, we have never been able to imagine a fully inclusive, multiracial society.

Black Indian Genealogy Research by Angela Y. Walton-Raji

Title Black Indian Genealogy Research
Author Angela Y. Walton-Raji
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2007
Category African Americans
Total Pages 248
ISBN 0788444735
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1907, the Indian Territory became the State of Oklahoma. To qualify for the payments and land allotments set aside for the Five Civilized Tribes, the former slaves of these nations had to apply for official enrollment, thus producing testimonies of imm

Title 100 Amazing Facts About the Negro with Complete Proof
Author J. A. Rogers
Publisher Wesleyan University Press
Release Date 2014-09-15
Category Social Science
Total Pages 72
ISBN 9780819575494
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

First published in 1934 and revised in 1962, this book gathers journalist and historian Joel Augustus Rogers’ columns from the syndicated newspaper feature titled Your History. Patterned after the look of Ripley’s popular Believe It or Not the multiple vignettes in each episode recount short items from Rogers’s research. The feature began in the Pittsburgh Courier in November 1934 and ran through the 1960s.