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Title The Music in African American Fiction
Author Robert H. Cataliotti
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2019-09-16
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781317945260
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is the first comprehensive historical analysis of how black music and musicians have been represented in the fiction of African American writers. It also examines how music and musicians in fiction have exemplified the sensibilities of African Americans and provided paradigms for an African American literary tradition. The fictional representation of African American music by black authors is traced from the nineteenth century (William Wells Brown, Martin Delany, Pauline E. Hopkins, Paul Laurence Dunbar) through the early twentieth century and the Harlem Renaissance (James Weldon Johnson, Langston Hughes, Claude McKay, Zora Neale Hurston) to the 1940s and 50s (Richard Wright, Ann Petry, James Baldwin, Ralph Ellison) and the 1960s and the Black Arts Movement (Margaret Walker, William Melvin Kelley, Leroi Jones/Amiri Baraka, Henry Dumas). In the century between Brown and Baraka, the representation of music in black fiction went through a dramatic metamorphosis. Music occupied a representative role in African American culture from which writers drew ideas and inspiration. The music provided a way out of a limited situation by offering a viable option to the strictures of racism. Individuals who overcome these limitations then become role models in the struggle toward equality. African American musical forms-for both artist and audience-also offerd a way of looking at the world, survival, and resistance. The black musician became a ritual leader. This study delineates how black writers have captured the spirit of the music that played such a pivotal role in African American culture. (Ph.D. dissertation, State University of New York at Stony Brook, 1993; revised with new preface and index)

Title The Apocalypse in African American Fiction
Author Maxine Lavon Montgomery
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1996
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 115
ISBN 0813013895
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this exploration of the relationship between biblical apocalypse and black fiction, Maxine Montgomery argues that American writers see apocalyptic events in an intermediate and secular sense, as a tenable response to racial oppression. This work analyzes the characters, plots, and themes of seven novels that rely on the apocalyptic trope.

Black Like Us by Devon W. Carbado

Title Black Like Us
Author Devon W. Carbado
Publisher Cleis Press
Release Date 2011-10-01
Category Fiction
Total Pages 555
ISBN 9781573447140
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Chronicles one hundred years of African-American homosexual literature, from the turn-of-the-century writings of Alice Dunbar Nelson, to the Harlem Renaissance of Langston Hughes, to the emerging sexual liberation movements of the later postwar era as reflected by James Baldwin. Original.

Black Fiction by Roger Rosenblatt

Title Black Fiction
Author Roger Rosenblatt
Publisher Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press
Release Date 1974
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 211
ISBN UOM:39015002291014
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Identifies the cyclical patterns that constitute a unifying element in novels dealing with the black experience in America.

Title Remembering the Past in Contemporary African American Fiction
Author Keith Byerman
Publisher Univ of North Carolina Press
Release Date 2006-05-18
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 240
ISBN 080787678X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

With close readings of more than twenty novels by writers including Ernest Gaines, Toni Morrison, Charles Johnson, Gloria Naylor, and John Edgar Wideman, Keith Byerman examines the trend among African American novelists of the late twentieth century to write about black history rather than about their own present. Employing cultural criticism and trauma theory, Byerman frames these works as survivor narratives that rewrite the grand American narrative of individual achievement and the march of democracy. The choice to write historical narratives, he says, must be understood historically. These writers earned widespread recognition for their writing in the 1980s, a period of African American commercial success, as well as the economic decline of the black working class and an increase in black-on-black crime. Byerman contends that a shared experience of suffering joins African American individuals in a group identity, and writing about the past serves as an act of resistance against essentialist ideas of black experience shaping the cultural discourse of the present. Byerman demonstrates that these novels disrupt the temptation in American society to engage history only to limit its significance or to crown successful individuals while forgetting the victims.

Title The City in African American Literature
Author Yoshinobu Hakutani
Publisher Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
Release Date 1995
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 265
ISBN 0838635652
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

While one of the central drives in classic American letters has been a reflexive desire to move away from the complexity and supposed corruption of cities toward such idealized nonurban settings as Cooper's prairies, Thoreau's woods, Melville's seas, Whitman's open road, and Twain's river, nearly the opposite has been true in African-American letters. Indeed the main tradition of African-American literature has been, for the most part, strikingly positive in its vision of the city. Although never hesitant to criticize the negative aspects of city life, classic African-American writers have only rarely suggested that pastoral alternatives exist for African-Americans and have therefore celebrated in a great variety of ways the possibilities of urban living. For Frederick Douglass, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, James Baldwin, and Ralph Ellison, the city, despite its many problems, has been a place of deliverance and renewal. In the words of Alain Locke, the city provided "a new vision of opportunity" for African-Americans that could enable them to move from an enslaving "medieval" world to a modern world containing the possibility of liberation. More recent African-American literature has also been noteworthy for its largely affirmative vision of urban life. Amiri Baraka's 1981 essay "Black Literature and the Afro-American Nation: The Urban Voice" argues that, from the Harlem Renaissance onward, African-American literature has been "urban shaped," producing a uniquely "black urban consciousness." And Toni Morrison, although stressing that the American city in general has often induced a sense of alienation in many African-American writers, nevertheless adds that modern African-American literature is suffused with an "affection" for "the village within" the city. Gwendolyn Brook's poetry and Gloria Naylor's fiction, likewise, celebrate this sense of cultural unity in the black city. In addition to these writers, the sixteen new essays in this collection discuss the works of Claude McKay, William Attaway, Willard Motley, Ann Petry, John A. Williams, Charles Johnson, Samuel R. Delany, Ed Bullins, Adrienne Kennedy, and Lorraine Hansberry. The authors of these essays range from critics in America to those abroad, as well as from specialists in African-American literature to those in other fields.

Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston

Title Their Eyes Were Watching God
Author Zora Neale Hurston
Publisher Prabhat Prakashan
Release Date 2020-05-30
Category Reference
Total Pages 192
ISBN 9203456XXXX
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Their Eyes Were Watching God is a 1937 novel by African-American writer Zora Neale Hurston. It is considered a classic of the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s, and it is likely Hurston's best known work.

Telling The Tale by Angela Benson

Title Telling the Tale
Author Angela Benson
Publisher Berkley Publishing Group
Release Date 2000
Category Language Arts & Disciplines
Total Pages 212
ISBN 0425170543
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Through exercises and example stories, discusses how African-Americans can develop skills as fiction writers by researching and integrating personal experiences, and provides tips on the process.

Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson

Title Brown Girl Dreaming
Author Jacqueline Woodson
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2014-08-28
Category Juvenile Nonfiction
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9780698195707
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Jacqueline Woodson is the 2018-2019 National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature A New York Times Bestseller and National Book Award Winner Jacqueline Woodson, the acclaimed author of Another Brooklyn, tells the moving story of her childhood in mesmerizing verse. Raised in South Carolina and New York, Woodson always felt halfway home in each place. In vivid poems, she shares what it was like to grow up as an African American in the 1960s and 1970s, living with the remnants of Jim Crow and her growing awareness of the Civil Rights movement. Touching and powerful, each poem is both accessible and emotionally charged, each line a glimpse into a child’s soul as she searches for her place in the world. Woodson’s eloquent poetry also reflects the joy of finding her voice through writing stories, despite the fact that she struggled with reading as a child. Her love of stories inspired her and stayed with her, creating the first sparks of the gifted writer she was to become. A National Book Award Winner A Newbery Honor Book A Coretta Scott King Award Winner Praise for Jacqueline Woodson: Ms. Woodson writes with a sure understanding of the thoughts of young people, offering a poetic, eloquent narrative that is not simply a story . . . but a mature exploration of grown-up issues and self-discovery.”—The New York Times Book Review

African American Classics by Langston Hughes

Title African American Classics
Author Langston Hughes
Publisher Eureka Productions
Release Date 2011
Category Comics & Graphic Novels
Total Pages 144
ISBN 0982563043
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Twenty-three stories and poems by African-American authors are retold in graphic novel format.

Title I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings
Author Maya Angelou
Publisher Random House
Release Date 2010-07-21
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 288
ISBN 9780307477729
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Here is a book as joyous and painful, as mysterious and memorable, as childhood itself. I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings captures the longing of lonely children, the brute insult of bigotry, and the wonder of words that can make the world right. Maya Angelou’s debut memoir is a modern American classic beloved worldwide. Sent by their mother to live with their devout, self-sufficient grandmother in a small Southern town, Maya and her brother, Bailey, endure the ache of abandonment and the prejudice of the local “powhitetrash.” At eight years old and back at her mother’s side in St. Louis, Maya is attacked by a man many times her age—and has to live with the consequences for a lifetime. Years later, in San Francisco, Maya learns that love for herself, the kindness of others, her own strong spirit, and the ideas of great authors (“I met and fell in love with William Shakespeare”) will allow her to be free instead of imprisoned. Poetic and powerful, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings will touch hearts and change minds for as long as people read. “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings liberates the reader into life simply because Maya Angelou confronts her own life with such a moving wonder, such a luminous dignity.”—James Baldwin From the Paperback edition.

Title Contemporary Black American Fiction Writers
Author Harold Bloom
Publisher Chelsea House
Release Date 1995
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 184
ISBN STANFORD:36105010534787
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Gives critical, bibliographical, and biographical information on 12 esteemed black American fiction writers.

Black Boy by Richard Wright

Title Black Boy
Author Richard Wright
Publisher almohreraladbi
Release Date 2021
Category Antiques & Collectibles
Total Pages 86
ISBN 9782123522034
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Breaking Ice by Terry McMillan

Title Breaking Ice
Author Terry McMillan
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1992
Category African Americans
Total Pages 418
ISBN 0099876507
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An anthology of African-American writing, edited by the author of Mama and Disappearing Acts. The collection includes works by both established and emerging authors, including Alice Walker, Gloria Naylor, John Edgar Wideman and J.California Cooper.

Title The Columbia Guide to Contemporary African American Fiction
Author Darryl Dickson-Carr
Publisher Columbia University Press
Release Date 2005-12-06
Category Literary Criticism
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9780231124720
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In both the literal and metaphorical senses, it seemed as if 1970s America was running out of gas. The decade not only witnessed long lines at gas stations but a citizenry that had grown weary and disillusioned. High unemployment, runaway inflation, and the energy crisis, caused in part by U.S. dependence on Arab oil, characterized an increasingly bleak economic situation. As Edward D. Berkowitz demonstrates, the end of the postwar economic boom, Watergate, and defeat in Vietnam led to an unraveling of the national consensus. During the decade, ideas about the United States, how it should be governed, and how its economy should be managed changed dramatically. Berkowitz argues that the postwar faith in sweeping social programs and a global U.S. mission was replaced by a more skeptical attitude about government's ability to positively affect society. From Woody Allen to Watergate, from the decline of the steel industry to the rise of Bill Gates, and from Saturday Night Fever to the Sunday morning fervor of evangelical preachers, Berkowitz captures the history, tone, and spirit of the seventies. He explores the decade's major political events and movements, including the rise and fall of détente, congressional reform, changes in healthcare policies, and the hostage crisis in Iran. The seventies also gave birth to several social movements and the "rights revolution," in which women, gays and lesbians, and people with disabilities all successfully fought for greater legal and social recognition. At the same time, reaction to these social movements as well as the issue of abortion introduced a new facet into American political life-the rise of powerful, politically conservative religious organizations and activists. Berkowitz also considers important shifts in American popular culture, recounting the creative renaissance in American film as well as the birth of the Hollywood blockbuster. He discusses how television programs such as All in the Family and Charlie's Angels offered Americans both a reflection of and an escape from the problems gripping the country.

The Old Drift by Namwali Serpell

Title The Old Drift
Author Namwali Serpell
Publisher Hogarth
Release Date 2019-03-26
Category Fiction
Total Pages 576
ISBN 9781101907160
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

“A dazzling debut, establishing Namwali Serpell as a writer on the world stage.”—Salman Rushdie, The New York Times Book Review NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Dwight Garner, The New York Times • The New York Times Book Review • Time • NPR • The Atlantic • BuzzFeed • Tordotcom • Kirkus Reviews • BookPage Winner of the Los Angeles Times Art Seidenbaum Award • Winner of the Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Fiction • Winner of the Windham-Campbell Prizes for Fiction 1904. On the banks of the Zambezi River, a few miles from the majestic Victoria Falls, there is a colonial settlement called The Old Drift. In a smoky room at the hotel across the river, an Old Drifter named Percy M. Clark, foggy with fever, makes a mistake that entangles the fates of an Italian hotelier and an African busboy. This sets off a cycle of unwitting retribution between three Zambian families (black, white, brown) as they collide and converge over the course of the century, into the present and beyond. As the generations pass, their lives—their triumphs, errors, losses and hopes—emerge through a panorama of history, fairytale, romance and science fiction. From a woman covered with hair and another plagued with endless tears, to forbidden love affairs and fiery political ones, to homegrown technological marvels like Afronauts, microdrones and viral vaccines, this gripping, unforgettable novel is a testament to our yearning to create and cross borders, and a meditation on the slow, grand passage of time. Finalist for the Los Angeles Times Ray Bradbury Prize • Longlisted for the Center for Fiction First Novel Prize “An intimate, brainy, gleaming epic . . . This is a dazzling book, as ambitious as any first novel published this decade.”—Dwight Garner, The New York Times “A founding epic in the vein of Virgil’s Aeneid . . . though in its sprawling size, its flavor of picaresque comedy and its fusion of family lore with national politics it more resembles Salman Rushdie’s Midnight’s Children.”—The Wall Street Journal “A story that intertwines strangers into families, which we'll follow for a century, magic into everyday moments, and the story of a nation, Zambia.”—NPR

Black Leopard Red Wolf by Marlon James

Title Black Leopard Red Wolf
Author Marlon James
Publisher Bond Street Books
Release Date 2019-02-05
Category Fiction
Total Pages 440
ISBN 9780385690331
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The epic new novel from Marlon James, the Man Booker Prize-winning author of A Brief History of Seven Killings: an African Game of Thrones. In the first novel in Marlon James' Dark Star trilogy, African myth, fantasy and history come together in the story of a band of mercenaries hired to find a missing child. Tracker is known far and wide for his skills as a hunter: "He has a nose," people say. Engaged by a mysterious slave trader to track down a boy who disappeared three years earlier, Tracker breaks his own rule of always working alone when he finds himself part of a group that comes together to find the boy. The band is a hodge-podge, full of unusual characters with secrets of their own, including a shape-shifting man-animal known as Leopard. As Tracker follows the boy's scent--from one ancient city to the next, through dense forests and across deep rivers--the band is set upon by creatures intent on destroying Tracker and his cohorts. As he struggles to survive, Tracker starts to wonder: Who, really, is this boy? Why has he been missing for so long? Why do so many people want to keep Tracker from finding him? And perhaps the most important question of all: who is telling the truth and who is lying? Combining African history and mythology and his own rich imagination, Marlon James has written an immersive saga of breathtaking adventure that's also a deeply involving novel. Black Leopard, Red Wolf is both an addictive page-turner and a genre-defying epic. Bold, ambitious and captivating, it's a literary event that's great fun to read.

Title Passing and the Rise of the African American Novel
Author Maria Giulia Fabi
Publisher University of Illinois Press
Release Date 2001
Category Fiction
Total Pages 187
ISBN 0252026675
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Passing and the Rise of the African American Novel restores to its rightful place a body of American literature that has long been overlooked, dismissed, or misjudged. This insightful reconsideration of nineteenth-century African-American fiction uncovers the literary artistry and ideological complexity of a body of work that laid the foundation for the Harlem Renaissance and changed the course of American letters. Focusing on the trope of passing -- black characters lightskinned enough to pass for white -- M. Giulia Fabi shows how early African-American authors such as William Wells Brown, Frank J. Webb, Charles W. Chesnutt, Sutton E. Griggs, James Weldon Johnson, Frances E. W. Harper, and Edward A. Johnson transformed traditional representations of blackness and moved beyond the tragic mulatto motif. Celebrating a distinctive, African-American history, culture, and worldview, these authors used passing to challenge the myths of racial purity and the color line. Fabi examines how early black writers adapted existing literary forms, including the sentimental romance, the domestic novel, and the utopian novel, to express their convictions and concerns about slavery, segregation, and racism. She also gives a historical overview of the canon-making enterprises of African-American critics from the 1850s to the 1990s and considers how their concerns about crafting a particular image for African-American literature affected their perceptions of nineteenth-century black fiction.

Title The Columbia Guide to Contemporary African American Fiction
Author Darryl Dickson-Carr
Publisher Columbia University Press
Release Date 2005-10-14
Category Literary Collections
Total Pages 280
ISBN 0231510691
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From Ishmael Reed and Toni Morrison to Colson Whitehead and Terry McMillan, Darryl Dickson-Carr offers a definitive guide to contemporary African American literature. This volume-the only reference work devoted exclusively to African American fiction of the last thirty-five years-presents a wealth of factual and interpretive information about the major authors, texts, movements, and ideas that have shaped contemporary African American fiction. In more than 160 concise entries, arranged alphabetically, Dickson-Carr discusses the careers, works, and critical receptions of Alice Walker, Gloria Naylor, Jamaica Kincaid, Charles Johnson, John Edgar Wideman, Leon Forrest, as well as other prominent and lesser-known authors. Each entry presents ways of reading the author's works, identifies key themes and influences, assesses the writer's overarching significance, and includes sources for further research. Dickson-Carr addresses the influence of a variety of literary movements, critical theories, and publishers of African American work. Topics discussed include the Black Arts Movement, African American postmodernism, feminism, and the influence of hip-hop, the blues, and jazz on African American novelists. In tracing these developments, Dickson-Carr examines the multitude of ways authors have portrayed the diverse experiences of African Americans. The Columbia Guide to Contemporary African American Fiction situates African American fiction in the social, political, and cultural contexts of post-Civil Rights era America: the drug epidemics of the 1980s and 1990s and the concomitant "war on drugs," the legacy of the Civil Rights Movement, the struggle for gay rights, feminism, the rise of HIV/AIDS, and racism's continuing effects on African American communities. Dickson-Carr also discusses the debates and controversies regarding the role of literature in African American life. The volume concludes with an extensive annotated bibliography of African American fiction and criticism.

Black And More Than Black by Cameron Leader-Picone

Title Black and More Than Black
Author Cameron Leader-Picone
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2019
Category American literature
Total Pages 86
ISBN 1496824555
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An impressive reading of recent writers who question the meaning of blackness while also embracing an elective racial identity