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A Traitor To His Species by Ernest Freeberg

Title A Traitor to His Species
Author Ernest Freeberg
Publisher Hachette UK
Release Date 2020-09-22
Category History
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9781541674165
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From an award-winning historian, the outlandish story of the man who gave rights to animals. In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and beast alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to grant rights to animals. A Traitor to His Species is revelatory social history, awash with colorful characters. Cheered on by thousands of men and women who joined his cause, Bergh fought with robber barons, Five Points gangs, and legendary impresario P.T. Barnum, as they pushed for new laws to protect trolley horses, livestock, stray dogs, and other animals. Raucous and entertaining, A Traitor to His Species tells the story of a remarkable man who gave voice to the voiceless and shaped our modern relationship with animals.

A Traitor To His Species by Ernest Freeberg

Title A Traitor to His Species
Author Ernest Freeberg
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2020-09-22
Category History
Total Pages 336
ISBN 9781541674165
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From an award-winning historian, the outlandish story of the man who gave rights to animals. In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and beast alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to grant rights to animals. A Traitor to His Species is revelatory social history, awash with colorful characters. Cheered on by thousands of men and women who joined his cause, Bergh fought with robber barons, Five Points gangs, and legendary impresario P.T. Barnum, as they pushed for new laws to protect trolley horses, livestock, stray dogs, and other animals. Raucous and entertaining, A Traitor to His Species tells the story of a remarkable man who gave voice to the voiceless and shaped our modern relationship with animals.

A Traitor To His Species by Ernest Freeberg

Title A Traitor to His Species
Author Ernest Freeberg
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020
Category BIOGRAPHY & AUTOBIOGRAPHY
Total Pages 322
ISBN 1541674154
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From an award-winning historian, the outlandish story of the man who gave rights to animals. In Gilded Age America, people and animals lived cheek-by-jowl in environments that were dirty and dangerous to man and beast alike. The industrial city brought suffering, but it also inspired a compassion for animals that fueled a controversial anti-cruelty movement. From the center of these debates, Henry Bergh launched a shocking campaign to grant rights to animals. A Traitor to His Species is revelatory social history, awash with colorful characters. Cheered on by thousands of men and women who joined his cause, Bergh fought with robber barons, Five Points gangs, and legendary impresario P.T. Barnum, as they pushed for new laws to protect trolley horses, livestock, stray dogs, and other animals. Raucous and entertaining, A Traitor to His Species tells the story of a remarkable man who gave voice to the voiceless and shaped our modern relationship with animals.

Species Traitor by Kate L Mary

Title Species Traitor
Author Kate L Mary
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2020-02-23
Category
Total Pages 374
ISBN 9798603508504
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

My name is Ava Mendoza, and I am a species traitor.They came hoping to find a new home after their own planet was destroyed, but Earth was dying as well, and most humans saw their arrival as an invasion. Now, two decades later, the Veilorians have been banished to the District, a fenced-in area on the outskirts of the last known livable land on Earth. Most people do their best to pretend they don't exist, but not everyone. There are humans, like my cousin, who see them for what they are. Despite the threat of disownment, she married a Veilorian, and now she, too, lives in the District. Even before I met Finn, I was determined to stand up for what was right, but from the moment I laid eyes on him, we had a connection I've never experienced before. But with the election of a new and radical mayor on the horizon, tensions are high, and people are calling for change. They want to make my cousin's marriage illegal and punish any human who goes into the District, but I refuse to back down from this fight. No matter the cost.

The Broken Heart Of America by Walter Johnson

Title The Broken Heart of America
Author Walter Johnson
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2020-04-14
Category History
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9781541646063
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A searing portrait of the racial dynamics that lie inescapably at the heart of our nation, told through the turbulent history of the city of St. Louis. From Lewis and Clark's 1804 expedition to the 2014 uprising in Ferguson, American history has been made in St. Louis. And as Walter Johnson shows in this searing book, the city exemplifies how imperialism, racism, and capitalism have persistently entwined to corrupt the nation's past. St. Louis was a staging post for Indian removal and imperial expansion, and its wealth grew on the backs of its poor black residents, from slavery through redlining and urban renewal. But it was once also America's most radical city, home to anti-capitalist immigrants, the Civil War's first general emancipation, and the nation's first general strike -- a legacy of resistance that endures. A blistering history of a city's rise and decline, The Broken Heart of America will forever change how we think about the United States.

Title The Impossible Presidency
Author Jeremi Suri
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2017-09-12
Category History
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9780465093908
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A bold new history of the American presidency, arguing that the successful presidents of the past created unrealistic expectations for every president since JFK, with enormously problematic implications for American politics In The Impossible Presidency, celebrated historian Jeremi Suri charts the rise and fall of the American presidency, from the limited role envisaged by the Founding Fathers to its current status as the most powerful job in the world. He argues that the presidency is a victim of its own success-the vastness of the job makes it almost impossible to fulfill the expectations placed upon it. As managers of the world's largest economy and military, contemporary presidents must react to a truly globalized world in a twenty-four-hour news cycle. There is little room left for bold vision. Suri traces America's disenchantment with our recent presidents to the inevitable mismatch between presidential promises and the structural limitations of the office. A masterful reassessment of presidential history, this book is essential reading for anyone trying to understand America's fraught political climate.

Title Fear of the Animal Planet
Author Jason Hribal
Publisher AK Press
Release Date 2011-01-11
Category Nature
Total Pages 280
ISBN 9781849350754
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Animals hate captivity; they tell us all the time. We just aren't listening.

The Gunning Of America by Pamela Haag

Title The Gunning of America
Author Pamela Haag
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2016-04-19
Category History
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9780465098569
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Americans have always loved guns. This special bond was forged during the American Revolution and sanctified by the Second Amendment. It is because of this exceptional relationship that American civilians are more heavily armed than the citizens of any other nation. Or so we’re told. In The Gunning of America, historian Pamela Haag overturns this conventional wisdom. American gun culture, she argues, developed not because the gun was exceptional, but precisely because it was not: guns proliferated in America because throughout most of the nation’s history, they were perceived as an unexceptional commodity, no different than buttons or typewriters. Focusing on the history of the Winchester Repeating Arms Company, one of the most iconic arms manufacturers in America, Haag challenges many basic assumptions of how and when America became a gun culture. Under the leadership of Oliver Winchester and his heirs, the company used aggressive, sometimes ingenious sales and marketing techniques to create new markets for their product. Guns have never “sold themselves”; rather, through advertising and innovative distribution campaigns, the gun industry did. Through the meticulous examination of gun industry archives, Haag challenges the myth of a primal bond between Americans and their firearms. Over the course of its 150 year history, the Winchester Repeating Arms Company sold over 8 million guns. But Oliver Winchester—a shirtmaker in his previous career—had no apparent qualms about a life spent arming America. His daughter-in-law Sarah Winchester was a different story. Legend holds that Sarah was haunted by what she considered a vast blood fortune, and became convinced that the ghosts of rifle victims were haunting her. She channeled much of her inheritance, and her conflicted conscience, into a monstrous estate now known as the Winchester Mystery House, where she sought refuge from this ever-expanding army of phantoms. In this provocative and deeply-researched work of narrative history, Haag fundamentally revises the history of arms in America, and in so doing explodes the clichés that have created and sustained our lethal gun culture.

Title America for Americans
Author Erika Lee
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2019-11-26
Category History
Total Pages 432
ISBN 9781541672598
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An award-winning historian reframes our continuing debate over immigration with a compelling history of xenophobia in the United States and its devastating impact The United States is known as a nation of immigrants. But it is also a nation of xenophobia. In America for Americans, Erika Lee shows that an irrational fear, hatred, and hostility toward immigrants has been a defining feature of our nation from the colonial era to the Trump era. Benjamin Franklin ridiculed Germans for their "strange and foreign ways." Americans' anxiety over Irish Catholics turned xenophobia into a national political movement. Chinese immigrants were excluded, Japanese incarcerated, and Mexicans deported. Today, Americans fear Muslims, Latinos, and the so-called browning of America. Forcing us to confront this history, America for Americans explains how xenophobia works, why it has endured, and how it threatens America. It is a necessary corrective and spur to action for any concerned citizen.

The Age Of Edison by Ernest Freeberg

Title The Age of Edison
Author Ernest Freeberg
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2013-02-21
Category Technology & Engineering
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9781101605479
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A sweeping history of the electric light revolution and the birth of modern America The late nineteenth century was a period of explosive technological creativity, but more than any other invention, Thomas Edison’s incandescent light bulb marked the arrival of modernity, transforming its inventor into a mythic figure and avatar of an era. In The Age of Edison, award-winning author and historian Ernest Freeberg weaves a narrative that reaches from Coney Island and Broadway to the tiniest towns of rural America, tracing the progress of electric light through the reactions of everyone who saw it and capturing the wonder Edison’s invention inspired. It is a quintessentially American story of ingenuity, ambition, and possibility in which the greater forces of progress and change are made by one of our most humble and ubiquitous objects.

They Didn T See Us Coming by Lisa Levenstein

Title They Didn t See Us Coming
Author Lisa Levenstein
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2020-07-14
Category History
Total Pages 304
ISBN 9780465095292
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

From an award-winning scholar, a vibrant portrait of a pivotal moment in the history of the feminist movement From the declaration of the "Year of the Woman" to the televising of Anita Hill's testimony, from Bitch magazine to SisterSong's demands for reproductive justice: the 90s saw the birth of some of the most lasting aspects of contemporary feminism. Historian Lisa Levenstein tracks this time of intense and international coalition building, one that centered on the growing influence of lesbians, women of color, and activists from the global South. Their work laid the foundation for the feminist energy seen in today's movements, including the 2017 Women's March and #MeToo campaigns. A revisionist history of the origins of contemporary feminism, They Didn't See Us Coming shows how women on the margins built a movement at the dawn of the Digital Age.

They Made America by Harold Evans

Title They Made America
Author Harold Evans
Publisher Back Bay Books
Release Date 2009-03-03
Category Technology & Engineering
Total Pages 496
ISBN 0316070343
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

An illustrated history of American innovators--some well known, some unknown, and all fascinating-- by the author of the bestselling The American Century.

No Man S Land by Wendy Moore

Title No Man s Land
Author Wendy Moore
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2020-04-28
Category History
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9781541672734
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Discover the true story of two pioneering suffragette doctors who transformed modern medicine, raised standards for patient care, and shattered social expectations for women in WWI-era London. A month after war broke out in 1914, doctors Flora Murray and Louisa Garrett Anderson set out for Paris, where they opened a hospital in a luxury hotel and treated hundreds of casualties plucked from France's battlefields. Although, prior to the war, female doctors were restricted to treating women and children, Flora and Louisa's work was so successful that the British Army asked them to set up a hospital in the heart of London. Nicknamed the Suffragettes' Hospital, Endell Street soon became known for its lifesaving treatments and lively atmosphere. In No Man's Land, Wendy Moore illuminates this turbulent moment when women were, for the first time, allowed to operate on men. Their fortitude and brilliance serve as powerful reminders of what women can achieve against all odds.

Title Quick and Easy Vegan Comfort Food
Author Alicia C. Simpson
Publisher The Experiment
Release Date 2009-10-06
Category Cooking
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9781615191093
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A born food-lover, raised in California on “the best Mexican food in the country” and her father’s “traditional Southern soul food,” Alicia C. Simpson couldn’t imagine giving up her favorite dishes to become vegan. Animal-free food might be healthier, but could it match the tastes of home—like fried chicken, macaroni and cheese, or a bowl of chili? Three years after Alicia took the vegan plunge, Quick and Easy Vegan Comfort Food answers that question with a resounding “yes!” Here is the essential cookbook for any of America’s more than 6 million vegans who miss the down-home tastes they remember (or want to try), or for vegetarians and even meat-eaters who want to add more plant-based foods to their diets, but don’t know where to start. Comfort-seeking cooks will find: Easy-to-prepare, animal-free versions of classics like Spicy Buffalo Bites, Ultimate Nachos, Baked Ziti and more 65 delicious combinations for breakfast, lunch, and dinner, with flavors from around the world, like “Chinese Take-In” or “Tijuana Torpedo” Everything you need to know to start your vegan pantry, and why being vegan is easier, less expensive, and more delicious than you might think. With spirit and style, Alicia shows just how easy—yes, and comforting—vegan food can be.

Title The Autobiography of a Traitor and a Half Savage
Author Alix E. Harrow
Publisher Tor Books
Release Date 2016-12-14
Category Fiction
Total Pages 32
ISBN 9780765392312
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Oona's blood is a river delta blending east and west, her hair red as Tennessee clay, her heart tangled as the wild lands she maps. By tracing rivers in ink on paper, Oona pins the land down to one reality and betrays her people. Can she escape the bonds of gold and blood and bone that tie her to the Imperial American River Company? At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Title The Heavens Might Crack
Author Jason Sokol
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2018-03-20
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9781541697393
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A vivid portrait of how Americans grappled with King's death and legacy in the days, weeks, and months after his assassination On April 4, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot as he stood on the balcony of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis. At the time of his murder, King was a polarizing figure--scorned by many white Americans, worshipped by some African Americans and liberal whites, and deemed irrelevant by many black youth. In The Heavens Might Crack, historian Jason Sokol traces the diverse responses, both in America and throughout the world, to King's death. Whether celebrating or mourning, most agreed that the final flicker of hope for a multiracial America had been extinguished. A deeply moving account of a country coming to terms with an act of shocking violence, The Heavens Might Crack is essential reading for anyone seeking to understand America's fraught racial past and present.

Monsters And Miracles by Gary Kaskel

Title Monsters and Miracles
Author Gary Kaskel
Publisher Infinity Pub
Release Date 2014-01-31
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 244
ISBN 0741477459
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Monsters and Miracles is the story of a complex and conflicted warrior for children and animals who changed the consciousness of a nation more than a century ago. As an animal advocate, I love the story of Henry Bergh, founder of the first animal protection society in America. It is simply a must-read for anyone interested in the humane movement and true American heroes. - Rory Freedman, author of Beg and co-author of Skinny Bitch. Henry Bergh is widely thought to have started the animal protection movement in America and now, thanks to Gary Kaskel's intelligent and compelling biography, we know how how this came to be. Kaskel paints a detailed and personal portrait of the man who taught us to respect animals. This is an important book that will be on the shelf for years to come-and it's a great read. - Elizabeth Hess, author of Nim Chimpsky: The Chimp Who would Be Human and Lost and Found. Kaskel has woven an urbane and atmospheric tale of New York and Europe in the mid-19th century and an aristocrat's passionate crusade not only to bring America forward on the subject of animal cruelty and children's rights but for meaning and purpose in his own life. - Andrew Gross, author of The Dark Tide and The Blue Zone

The Russian Revolution by Sean McMeekin

Title The Russian Revolution
Author Sean McMeekin
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2017-05-30
Category History
Total Pages 496
ISBN 9780465094974
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The definitive, single-volume history of the Russian Revolution, from an award-winning scholar In The Russian Revolution, acclaimed historian Sean McMeekin traces the events which ended Romanov rule, ushered the Bolsheviks into power, and introduced Communism to the world. Between 1917 and 1922, Russia underwent a complete and irreversible transformation. Taking advantage of the collapse of the Tsarist regime in the middle of World War I, the Bolsheviks staged a hostile takeover of the Russian Imperial Army, promoting mutinies and mass desertions of men in order to fulfill Lenin's program of turning the "imperialist war" into civil war. By the time the Bolsheviks had snuffed out the last resistance five years later, over 20 million people had died, and the Russian economy had collapsed so completely that Communism had to be temporarily abandoned. Still, Bolshevik rule was secure, owing to the new regime's monopoly on force, enabled by illicit arms deals signed with capitalist neighbors such as Germany and Sweden who sought to benefit-politically and economically-from the revolutionary chaos in Russia. Drawing on scores of previously untapped files from Russian archives and a range of other repositories in Europe, Turkey, and the United States, McMeekin delivers exciting, groundbreaking research about this turbulent era. The first comprehensive history of these momentous events in two decades, The Russian Revolution combines cutting-edge scholarship and a fast-paced narrative to shed new light on one of the most significant turning points of the twentieth century.

Title The Travels of Marco Polo the Venetian
Author Marco Polo
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1854
Category Asia
Total Pages 508
ISBN OXFORD:590797443
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The War Lovers by Evan Thomas

Title The War Lovers
Author Evan Thomas
Publisher Hachette+ORM
Release Date 2010-04-10
Category History
Total Pages 445
ISBN 9780316087988
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The national bestselling and “compulsively readable” history of late 19th century American war fever “is hard to forget and hard to put down” (The New York Times Book Review). On February 15, 1898, the American ship USS Maine mysteriously exploded in the Havana Harbor. Some in the United States greeted the event with more enthusiasm than alarm. Dismayed by the “closing” of the Western frontier, politicians Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge wanted to see their country exert its muscle overseas. The sinking of the Maine would provide the excuse they’d been waiting for, especially when newspaper mogul William Randolph Hearst falsely announced in the New York Journal that Spain’s “secret infernal machine” had destroyed the battleship. Meanwhile, the philosopher William James, Roosevelt’s former teacher, and Thomas Reed, the powerful Speaker of the House, stood against what would become the Spanish-American War. At stake was not only sending troops to fight Spain in Cuba and the Philippines, but the friendships between these men. Now, bestselling historian Evan Thomas examines this monumental turning point in American history. Epic in scope and revelatory in detail, The War Lovers takes us from Boston mansions to the halls of Congress to the beaches of Cuba and the jungles of the Philippines. It is landmark work with an unforgettable cast of characters—and provocative relevance today.