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38 Nooses by Scott W. Berg

Title 38 Nooses
Author Scott W. Berg
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2013
Category History
Total Pages 363
ISBN 9780307389138
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Placed in the context of the Civil War, this account revisits the Dakota War of 1862, an uprising on the Minnesota frontier which resulted in the forced relocation of the Dakota and the hanging of thirty-eight Dakota warriors.

Columns Of Vengeance by Paul N. Beck

Title Columns of Vengeance
Author Paul N. Beck
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2014-10-22
Category History
Total Pages 328
ISBN 9780806147697
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In summer 1862, Minnesotans found themselves fighting interconnected wars—the first against the rebellious Southern states, and the second an internal war against the Sioux. While the Civil War was more important to the future of the United States, the Dakota War of 1862 proved far more destructive to the people of Minnesota—both whites and American Indians. It led to U.S. military action against the Sioux, divided the Dakotas over whether to fight or not, and left hundreds of white settlers dead. In Columns of Vengeance, historian Paul N. Beck offers a reappraisal of the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864, the U.S. Army’s response to the Dakota War of 1862. Whereas previous accounts have approached the Punitive Expeditions as a military campaign of the Indian Wars, Beck argues that the expeditions were also an extension of the Civil War. The strategy and tactics reflected those of the war in the East, and Civil War operations directly affected planning and logistics in the West. Beck also examines the devastating impact the expeditions had on the various bands and tribes of the Sioux. Whites viewed the expeditions as punishment—“columns of vengeance” sent against those Dakotas who had started the war in 1862—yet the majority of the Sioux the army encountered had little or nothing to do with the earlier uprising in Minnesota. Rather than relying only on the official records of the commanding officers involved, Beck presents a much fuller picture of the conflict by consulting the letters, diaries, and personal accounts of the common soldiers who took part in the expeditions, as well as rare personal narratives from the Dakotas. Drawing on a wealth of firsthand accounts and linking the Punitive Expeditions of 1863 and 1864 to the overall Civil War experience, Columns of Vengeance offers fresh insight into an important chapter in the development of U.S. military operations against the Sioux.

Lincoln And The Indians by David Allen Nichols

Title Lincoln and the Indians
Author David Allen Nichols
Publisher Minnesota Historical Society Press
Release Date 1978
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 223
ISBN 9780873518765
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Lincoln and the Indians is the only thorough treatment of Lincoln's Indian policy during the Civil War and the corrupt "Indian System" of government aid that mainly benefitted ambitious whites.

Chasing Phil by David Howard

Title Chasing Phil
Author David Howard
Publisher Crown
Release Date 2017-10-10
Category True Crime
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9781101907443
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A thrilling true crime caper, bursting with colorful characters and awash in ‘70s glamour, that spotlights the FBI's first white-collar undercover sting 1977, the Thunderbird Motel. J.J. Wedick and Jack Brennan—two fresh-faced, maverick FBI agents—were about to embark on one of their agency's first wire-wearing undercover missions. Their target? Charismatic, globetrotting con man Phil Kitzer, whom some called the world's greatest swindler. From the Thunderbird, the three men took off to Cleveland, to Miami, to Hawaii, to Frankfurt, to the Bahamas—meeting other members of Kitzer's crime syndicate and powerful politicians and businessmen he fooled at each stop. But as the young agents, playing the role of proteges and co-conspirators, became further entangled in Phil's outrageous schemes over their months on the road, they also grew to respect him—even care for him. Meanwhile, Phil began to think of Jack and J.J. as best friends, sharing hotel rooms and inside jokes with them and even competing with J.J. in picking up women. Phil Kitzer was at the center of dozens of scams in which he swindled millions of dollars, but the FBI was mired in a post-Watergate malaise and slow to pivot toward a new type of financial crime that is now all too familiar. Plunging into the field with no undercover training, the agents battled a creaky bureaucracy on their adventures with Phil, hoping the FBI would recognize the importance of their mission. Even as they grew closer to Phil, they recognized that their endgame—the swindler's arrest—was drawing near… Anchored by larger-than-life characters, framed by exotic locales and an irresistible era, Chasing Phil is high drama and propulsive reading, delivered by an effortless storyteller.

The Thirteenth Turn by Jack Shuler

Title The Thirteenth Turn
Author Jack Shuler
Publisher PublicAffairs
Release Date 2014-08-26
Category Social Science
Total Pages 368
ISBN 9781610391375
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The story of a rope, a symbol, and rough justice in America. The hangman's knot is a simple thing to tie, just a rope carefully coiled around itself up to thirteen times. But in those thirteen turns lie a powerful symbol, one that is all too deeply connected to America's past—and present. The last man to be hanged in the United States was Billy Bailey, who was executed in Delaware in 1996 for committing a double murder. Even today, hanging is still legal, in certain situations, in New Hampshire and Washington. And the noose remains a potent cultural symbol. An incident in Jena, Louisiana, in 2006, in which nooses were used to menace black students, made national news. Yet little has changed: according to author Jack Shuler, there have been nearly 100 “noose incidents” just in the last two years. The Thirteenth Turn unravels these stories, from Judas Iscariot, perhaps the most infamous hanged man, to the killing of Perry Smith and Richard Hickock, the murderers at the heart of Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, and beyond. In his travels across America, Shuler traces the evolution of this dark practice. As he investigates the death of John Brown, or the 1930 lynching that inspired the song “Strange Fruit,” he finds that the very places that perpetrated these acts now seek to forget them. Shuler's account is a kind of shadow history of America: a reminder that vigilantes and hangmen play a crucial role in our national story. The Thirteenth Turn is a courageous and searching book that reminds us where we come from, and what is lost if we forget.

Through Dakota Eyes by Gary Clayton Anderson

Title Through Dakota Eyes
Author Gary Clayton Anderson
Publisher Borealis Book
Release Date 1988
Category History
Total Pages 316
ISBN 0873512162
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A collection of personal accounts chronicling the experiences of the Native Americans and soldiers who fought in the Minnesota Indian War of 1862.

Over The Earth I Come by Duane Schultz

Title Over the Earth I Come
Author Duane Schultz
Publisher Ulverscroft Large Print
Release Date 1993
Category History
Total Pages 640
ISBN 0708929427
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

December 26, 1862. On the day after Christmas, in Mankato, Minnesota, thirty-eight Indians were hanged on the order of President Lincoln. This event stands today as the greatest mass execution in the history of the United States. In Over The Earth I Come, Duane Schultz brilliantly retells one of America's most violent and bloody events--the Great Sioux Uprising of 1862.

Grand Avenues by Scott W. Berg

Title Grand Avenues
Author Scott W. Berg
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2009-03-11
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 352
ISBN 9780307556486
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In 1791, shortly after the United States won its independence, George Washington personally asked Pierre Charles L’Enfant—a young French artisan turned American revolutionary soldier who gained many friends among the Founding Fathers—to design the new nation's capital. L’Enfant approached this task with unparalleled vigor and passion; however, his imperious and unyielding nature also made him many powerful enemies. After eleven months, Washington reluctantly dismissed L’Enfant from the project. Subsequently, the plan for the city was published under another name, and L’Enfant died long before it was rightfully attributed to him. Filled with incredible characters and passionate human drama, Scott W. Berg’s deft narrative account of this little-explored story in American history is a tribute to the genius of Pierre Charles L'Enfant and the enduring city that is his legacy.

Brigham Young by John G. Turner

Title Brigham Young
Author John G. Turner
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2012-09-25
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 490
ISBN 9780674067318
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Brigham Young was a rough-hewn New York craftsman whose impoverished life was electrified by the Mormon faith. Turner provides a fully realized portrait of this spiritual prophet, viewed by followers as a protector and by opponents as a heretic. His pioneering faith made a deep imprint on tens of thousands of lives in the American Mountain West.

Title American Fire Love Arson and Life in a Vanishing Land
Author Monica Hesse
Publisher Liveright Publishing
Release Date 2017-07-11
Category Social Science
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9781631490521
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A New York Times Notable Book of the Year A Washington Post Notable Book of the Year One of Amazon’s 20 Best Books of the Year Named one of the Best Books of the Year by Buzzfeed, Bustle, NPR, NYLON, and Thrillist Finalist for the Goodreads Book Award (Nonfiction) Finalist for the Edgar Award (Best Fact Crime) A Book of the Month Club Selection A New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice Selection “A brisk, captivating and expertly crafted reconstruction of a community living through a time of fear.... Masterful.” —Washington Post The arsons started on a cold November midnight and didn’t stop for months. Night after night, the people of Accomack County waited to see which building would burn down next, regarding each other at first with compassion, and later suspicion. Vigilante groups sprang up, patrolling the rural Virginia coast with cameras and camouflage. Volunteer firefighters slept at their stations. The arsonist seemed to target abandoned buildings, but local police were stretched too thin to surveil them all. Accomack was desolate—there were hundreds of abandoned buildings. And by the dozen they were burning. “One of the year’s best and most unusual true-crime books” (Christian Science Monitor), American Fire brings to vivid life the reeling county of Accomack. “Ace reporter” (Entertainment Weekly) Monica Hesse spent years investigating the story, emerging with breathtaking portraits of the arsonists—troubled addict Charlie Smith and his girlfriend, Tonya Bundick. Tracing the shift in their relationship from true love to crime spree, Hesse also conjures the once-thriving coastal community, decimated by a punishing economy and increasingly suspicious of their neighbors as the culprits remained at large. Weaving the story into the history of arson in the United States, the critically acclaimed American Fire re-creates the anguished nights this quiet county lit up in flames, evoking a microcosm of rural America—a land half-gutted before the fires began.

Joe Gould S Teeth by Jill Lepore

Title Joe Gould s Teeth
Author Jill Lepore
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2016
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 235
ISBN 9781101971796
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"A "New Yorker" staff writer and Harvard historian chronicles the discovery of Joe Gould's long-lost manuscript, "The Oral History of Our Time," and of the violence, betrayals, and madness that led to its concealment, "--NoveList.

The Sioux Uprising Of 1862 by Kenneth Carley

Title The Sioux Uprising of 1862
Author Kenneth Carley
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 1976
Category Dakota Indians
Total Pages 102
ISBN UOM:39015035336984
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

While the Civil War raged in the East and South, Dakota Indians in Minnesota erupted violently into action against white settlers, igniting the tragic Dakota War of 1862. Hemmed in on a narrow reservation along the upper Minnesota River, the Dakota (Sioux) were frustrated by broken treaties, angered by dishonest agents and traders, and near starvation because of crop failures and late annuity payments. Led by Little Crow, Dakota warriors attacked the Redwood and Yellow Medicine Indian agencies and all whites living on their former lands in south-western Minnesota. They killed more than 450 whites and took some 250 white and mixed-blood prisoners during the 38-day conflict. White civilians and military units commanded by Henry H. Sibley defended towns and forts, pursued warriors, and eventually forced the Indians to surrender or flee westward. The penalties imposed by vengeful whites were swift and devastating. The federal government hanged 38 Dakota men in the largest mass execution in US history, 300 were imprisoned, and the Dakota people were banished from the state. This is the most accessible and balanced account available which draws on a wealth of written and visual materials by white and Indian participants and observers to show the sources of the Dakotas' justified and bitter wrath -- and the terrible consequences of the conflict.--Amazon.com.

The Sea And Civilization by Lincoln Paine

Title The Sea and Civilization
Author Lincoln Paine
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2015
Category History
Total Pages 800
ISBN 9781101970355
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

A monumental, wholly accessible work of scholarship that retells human history through the story of mankind's relationship with the sea. An accomplishment of both great sweep and illuminating detail, The Sea and Civilization is a stunning work of history that reveals in breathtaking depth how people first came into contact with one another by ocean and river, and how goods, languages, religions, and entire cultures spread across and along the world's waterways. Lincoln Paine takes us back to the origins of long-distance migration by sea with our ancestors' first forays from Africa and Eurasia to Australia and the Americas. He demonstrates the critical role of maritime trade to the civilizations of ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia, and the Indus Valley. He reacquaints us with the great seafaring cultures of antiquity like those of the Phoenicians and Greeks, as well as those of India, Southeast and East Asia who parlayed their navigational skills, shipbuilding techniques, and commercial acumen to establish vibrant overseas colonies and trade routes in the centuries leading up to the age of European overseas expansion. His narrative traces subsequent developments in commercial and naval shipping through the post-Cold War era. Above all, Paine makes clear how the rise and fall of civilizations can be traced to the sea.

Title The North Carolina Historical Review
Author Anonim
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2013
Category North Carolina
Total Pages 86
ISBN UCSD:31822041194333
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Title The Infamous Dakota War Trials of 1862
Author John A. Haymond
Publisher McFarland
Release Date 2016-05-23
Category History
Total Pages 276
ISBN 9781476665108
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The U.S.-Dakota War, the bloodiest Indian war of the 19th century, erupted in southwestern Minnesota during the summer of 1862. In the war's aftermath, a hastily convened commission of five army officers conducted trials of 391 Indians charged with murder and massacre. In 36 days, 303 Dakota men were sentenced to death. In the largest simultaneous execution in American history, 38 were hanged on a single gallows on December 26, 1862--an incident now widely considered an act of revenge rather than judicial punishment. Providing fresh insight into this controversial event, this book examines the Dakota War trials from the perspective of 19th century military law. The author discusses the causes and far-reaching consequences of the war, the claims of widespread atrocities, the modern debate over the role of culture in lawful warfare and how the war has been depicted by historians.

Vanished In Hiawatha by Carla Joinson

Title Vanished in Hiawatha
Author Carla Joinson
Publisher Bison Books
Release Date 2020-11
Category History
Total Pages 426
ISBN 9781496223654
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Vanished in Hiawatha is a harrowing look into the mistreatment of Native Americans at the Canton (South Dakota) Asylum for Insane Indians from 1902 to 1934.

38 by John Steven Beckmann

Title 38
Author John Steven Beckmann
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2012-06-18
Category Dakota Indians
Total Pages 104
ISBN 0615615473
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Mankato, Minnesota - the day after Christmas 1862: thirty-eight Lakota Indians of the Santee band will be hanged for their participation in the Great Sioux Uprising. Shackled together, the condemned warriors are led onto a scaffold the size of a large house and fitted with nooses. The doomed men chant their death songs, voices muffled by hoods covering their faces. When the scaffold is dropped, the men plunge downward together, dying in the largest mass execution in United States history. This work of fiction restores voices to those made silent on that cold and dark December day. From the grave, these 38 warriors confess their crimes, justify their actions, plead innocence or admit guilt in this unique, imaginative portrayal of one of the most tragic episodes in our American past.

Lincoln S Bishop by Gustav Niebuhr

Title Lincoln s Bishop
Author Gustav Niebuhr
Publisher Harper Collins
Release Date 2014-05-27
Category History
Total Pages 224
ISBN 9780062110992
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In the tradition of Doris Kearns Goodwin's Team of Rivals comes Gustav Niebuhr's compelling history of Abraham Lincoln's decision in 1862 to spare the lives of 265 condemned Sioux men, and the Episcopal bishop who was his moral compass, helping guide the president's conscience. More than a century ago, during the formative years of the American nation, Protestant churches carried powerful moral authority, giving voice to values such as mercy and compassion, while boldly standing against injustice and immorality. Gustav Niebuhr travels back to this defining period, to explore Abraham Lincoln's decision to spare the lives of 265 Sioux men sentenced to die by a military tribunal in Minnesota for warfare against white settlers—while allowing the hanging of 38 others, the largest single execution on American soil. Popular opinion favored death or expulsion. Only one state leader championed the cause of the Native Americans, Episcopal bishop, Henry Benjamin Whipple. Though he'd never met an Indian until he was 37 years old, Whipple befriended them before the massacre and understood their plight at the hands of corrupt government officials and businessmen. After their trial, he pleaded with Lincoln to extend mercy and implement true justice. Bringing to life this little known event and this extraordinary man, Niebuhr pays tribute to the once amazing moral force of mainline Protestant churches and the practitioners who guarded America's conscience. Lincoln's Bishop is illustrated with 16 pages of black-and-white photos.

Death Of A Dream by Paul Lundborg

Title Death of a Dream
Author Paul Lundborg
Publisher Createspace Independent Pub
Release Date 2013-02-17
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 116
ISBN 1482578107
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This is a story of sacrifice and tragedy fueled by the long-held immigrant's dream for a new beginning in a new land. In 1861, a large extended family of Swedes settles on the far northwest edge of the new state of Minnesota. One year later, as the late-summer harvest is in, a group of Dakota warriors declares war on all the settlers. In a surprise attack, 13 members of this family are killed. Left behind are eight others who flee for refuge, joining hundreds of other terrified residents of the state. This is the story of my family--my great, great grandparents, their children, their cousins and their children. I write it to honor my ancestors and help my extended family know and understand it. I think others will appreciate this story as well, as it reveals the courage and persistence evoked in the face of a great tragedy in which at least 650 civilians were killed. The Dakota people also suffered deeply, but theirs is not my story to tell. I write in the hope that descendants of the Dakota and descendants of the White settlers will one day be able to share our stories with one another.

Massacre In Minnesota by Gary Clayton Anderson

Title Massacre in Minnesota
Author Gary Clayton Anderson
Publisher University of Oklahoma Press
Release Date 2019-10-17
Category History
Total Pages 384
ISBN 9780806166025
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In August 1862 the worst massacre in U.S. history unfolded on the Minnesota prairie, launching what has come to be known as the Dakota War, the most violent ethnic conflict ever to roil the nation. When it was over, between six and seven hundred white settlers had been murdered in their homes, and thirty to forty thousand had fled the frontier of Minnesota. But the devastation was not all on one side. More than five hundred Indians, many of them women and children, perished in the aftermath of the conflict; and thirty-eight Dakota warriors were executed on one gallows, the largest mass execution ever in North America. The horror of such wholesale violence has long obscured what really happened in Minnesota in 1862—from its complicated origins to the consequences that reverberate to this day. A sweeping work of narrative history, the result of forty years’ research, Massacre in Minnesota provides the most complete account of this dark moment in U.S. history. Focusing on key figures caught up in the conflict—Indian, American, and Franco- and Anglo-Dakota—Gary Clayton Anderson gives these long-ago events a striking immediacy, capturing the fears of the fleeing settlers, the animosity of newspaper editors and soldiers, the violent dedication of Dakota warriors, and the terrible struggles of seized women and children. Through rarely seen journal entries, newspaper accounts, and military records, integrated with biographical detail, Anderson documents the vast corruption within the Bureau of Indian Affairs, the crisis that arose as pioneers overran Indian lands, the failures of tribal leadership and institutions, and the systemic strains caused by the Civil War. Anderson also gives due attention to Indian cultural viewpoints, offering insight into the relationship between Native warfare, religion, and life after death—a nexus critical to understanding the conflict. Ultimately, what emerges most clearly from Anderson’s account is the outsize suffering of innocents on both sides of the Dakota War—and, identified unequivocally for the first time, the role of white duplicity in bringing about this unprecedented and needless calamity.