How to Make a Slave and Other Essays

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How to Make a Slave and Other Essays
Title How to Make a Slave and Other Essays
Author
Publisher Mad Creek Books
Release DateOctober 30, 2020
Category Biographies & Memoirs
Total Pages 164 pages
ISBN 081425599X
Book Rating 4.7 out of 5 from 4 reviews
Language EN, ES, BE, DA ,DE , NL and FR
Book Review & Summary:

Finalist for the 2020 National Book Award in Nonfiction “The essays in this collection are restless, brilliant and short.…The brevity suits not just Walker’s style but his worldview, too.…Keeping things quick gives him the freedom to move; he can alight on a truth without pinning it into place.” —Jennifer Szalai, the New York Times For the black community, Jerald Walker asserts in How to Make a Slave, “anger is often a prelude to a joke, as there is broad understanding that the triumph over this destructive emotion lay in finding its punchline.” It is on the knife’s edge between fury and farce that the essays in this exquisite collection balance. Whether confronting the medical profession’s racial biases, considering the complicated legacy of Michael Jackson, paying homage to his writing mentor James Alan McPherson, or attempting to break free of personal and societal stereotypes, Walker elegantly blends personal revelation and cultural critique. The result is a bracing and often humorous examination by one of America’s most acclaimed essayists of what it is to grow, parent, write, and exist as a black American male. Walker refuses to lull his readers; instead his missives urge them to do better as they consider, through his eyes, how to be a good citizen, how to be a good father, how to live, and how to love.

Similar books related to " How to Make a Slave and Other Essays " from our database.
Title How to Make a Slave and Other Essays
Author Jerald Walker
Publisher Mad Creek Books
Release Date 2020
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 152
ISBN 081425599X
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Personal essays exploring identity, work, family, and community through the prism of race and black culture.

Thick by Tressie McMillan Cottom

Title Thick
Author Tressie McMillan Cottom
Publisher The New Press
Release Date 2018-01-08
Category Social Science
Total Pages 248
ISBN 9781620974377
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

One of Book Riot's “The Best Books We Read in October 2018” “To say this collection is transgressive, provocative, and brilliant is simply to tell you the truth.” —Roxane Gay, author of Hunger and Bad Feminist Smart, humorous, and strikingly original essays by one of “America’s most bracing thinkers on race, gender, and capitalism of our time” (Rebecca Traister) In these eight piercing explorations on beauty, media, money, and more, Tressie McMillan Cottom—award-winning professor and acclaimed author of Lower Ed—embraces her venerated role as a purveyor of wit, wisdom, and Black Twitter snark about all that is right and much that is wrong with this thing we call society. Ideas and identity fuse effortlessly in this vibrant collection that on bookshelves is just as at home alongside Rebecca Solnit and bell hooks as it is beside Jeff Chang and Janet Mock. It also fills an important void on those very shelves: a modern black American feminist voice waxing poetic on self and society, serving up a healthy portion of clever prose and southern aphorisms as she covers everything from Saturday Night Live, LinkedIn, and BBQ Becky to sexual violence, infant mortality, and Trump rallies. Thick speaks fearlessly to a range of topics and is far more genre-bending than a typical compendium of personal essays. An intrepid intellectual force hailed by the likes of Trevor Noah, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Oprah, Tressie McMillan Cottom is “among America’s most bracing thinkers on race, gender, and capitalism of our time” (Rebecca Traister). This stunning debut collection—in all its intersectional glory—mines for meaning in places many of us miss, and reveals precisely how the political, the social, and the personal are almost always one and the same.

Title Extending the Frontiers
Author David Eltis
Publisher Yale University Press
Release Date 2008-10-07
Category History
Total Pages 394
ISBN 9780300151749
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"The essays in this book provide statistical analysis of the transatlantic slave trade, focusing especially on Brazil and Portugal, from the 17th through the 19th century. It contains the most up-to-date and comprehensive research on slave ship voyages, origins, destinations, numbers of slaves per port, country, year, and period. In 1999 the same authors published The Transatlantic Slave Trade Dataset (Cambridge, book and CD), but it did not include data on Brazil and Central America, which this book fills in"--Provided by the publisher.

Title Black Rednecks and White Liberals
Author Thomas Sowell
Publisher ReadHowYouWant.com
Release Date 2010-09-17
Category
Total Pages 580
ISBN 9781459602212
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This explosive new book challenges many of the long-prevailing assumptions about blacks, about Jews, about Germans, about slavery, and about education. Plainly written, powerfully reasoned, and backed with a startling array of documented facts, Black Rednecks and White Liberals takes on not only the trendy intellectuals of our times but also such historic interpreters of American life as Alexis de Tocqueville and Frederick Law Olmsted. In a series of long essays, this book presents an in-depth look at key beliefs behind many mistaken and dangerous actions, policies, and trends. It presents eye-opening insights into the historical development of the ghetto culture that is today wrongly seen as a unique black identity - a culture cheered on toward self-destruction by white liberals who consider themselves ''friends'' of blacks. An essay titled ''the Real History of Slavery'' presents a jolting re-examination of that tragic institution and the narrow and distorted way it is too often seen today. The reasons for the venomous hatred of Jews, and of other groups like them in countries around the world, are explored in an essay that asks, ''Are Jews Generic?'' Misconceptions of German history in general, and of the Nazi era in particular, are also re-examined. So too are the inspiring achievements and painful tragedies of black education in the United States. Black Rednecks and White Liberals is the capstone of decades of outstanding research and writing on racial and cultural issues by Thomas Sowell.

Title Twelve Years A Slave Illustrated
Author Solomon Northup
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2014-08-22
Category History
Total Pages 300
ISBN 9782765903192
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Twelve Years a Slave (1853) is a memoir and slave narrative by Solomon Northup, as told to and edited by David Wilson. Northup, a black man who was born free in New York, details his kidnapping in Washington, D.C. and subsequent sale into slavery. After having been kept in bondage for 12 years in Louisiana by various masters, Northup was able to write to friends and family in New York, who were in turn able to secure his release. Northup's account provides extensive details on the slave markets in Washington, D.C. and New Orleans and describes at length cotton and sugar cultivation on major plantations in Louisiana.

Title The Art of Slave Narrative
Author John Sekora
Publisher Western Illinois Univ
Release Date 1982
Category African Americans
Total Pages 149
ISBN UOM:39015032446331
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Street Shadows by Jerald Walker

Title Street Shadows
Author Jerald Walker
Publisher Bantam
Release Date 2010-01-26
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 256
ISBN 9780553906332
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Masterfully told, marked by irony and humor as well as outrage and a barely contained sadness, Jerald Walker’s Street Shadows is the story of a young man’s descent into the “thug life” and the wake-up call that led to his finding himself again. Walker was born in a Chicago housing project and raised, along with his six brothers and sisters, by blind parents of modest means but middle-class aspirations. A boy of great promise whose parents and teachers saw success in his future, he seemed destined to fulfill their hopes. But by age fourteen, like so many of his friends, he found himself drawn to the streets. By age seventeen he was a school dropout, a drug addict, and a gangbanger, his life spiraling toward the violent and premature end all too familiar to African American males. And then came the blast of gunfire that changed everything: His coke-dealing friend Greg was shot to death—less than an hour after Walker scored a gram from him. “Twenty-five years later, tossing the drug out the window is still the second most difficult thing I’ve ever done. The most difficult thing is still that I didn’t follow it.” So begins the story, told in alternating time frames, of the journey that Walker took to become the man he is today—a husband, father, teacher, and writer. But his struggle to escape the long shadows of the streets was not easy. There were racial stereotypes to overcome—his own as well as those of the very white world he found himself in—and a hard grappling with the meaning of race that came to an unexpected climax on a trip to Africa. An eloquent account of how the past shadows but need not determine the present, Street Shadows is the opposite of a victim narrative. Walker casts no blame (except upon himself), sheds no tears (except for those who have not shared his good fortune), and refuses the temptations of self-pity and self-exoneration. In the end, what Jerald Walker has written is a stirring portrait of two Americas—one hopeless, the other inspirational—embodied within one man.

Politics by Aristotle

Title Politics
Author Aristotle
Publisher Sheba Blake Publishing
Release Date 2017-04-28
Category Political Science
Total Pages 187
ISBN 9783961895441
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Politics is a work of political philosophy by Aristotle, a 4th-century BC Greek philosopher. The end of the Nicomachean Ethics declared that the inquiry into ethics necessarily follows into politics, and the two works are frequently considered to be parts of a larger treatise, or perhaps connected lectures, dealing with the "philosophy of human affairs." The title of the Politics literally means "the things concerning the polis." Aristotle's Politics is divided into eight books which are each further divided into chapters. Citations of this work, as with the rest of the works of Aristotle, are often made by referring to the Bekker section numbers. Politics spans the Bekker sections 1252a to 1342b. After studying a number of real and theoretical city-states' constitutions, Aristotle classified them according to various criteria. On one side stand the true (or good) constitutions, which are considered such because they aim for the common good, and on the other side the perverted (or deviant) ones, considered such because they aim for the well being of only a part of the city. The constitutions are then sorted according to the "number" of those who participate to the magistracies: one, a few, or many. Aristotle's sixfold classification is slightly different from the one found in The Statesman by Plato. The diagram above illustrates Aristotle's classification. The literary character of the Politics is subject to some dispute, growing out of the textual difficulties that attended the loss of Aristotle's works. Book III ends with a sentence that is repeated almost verbatim at the start of Book VII, while the intervening Books IV–VI seem to have a very different flavor from the rest; Book IV seems to refer several times back to the discussion of the best regime contained in Books VII–VIII. Some editors have therefore inserted Books VII–VIII after Book III.

The World In Flames by Jerald Walker

Title The World in Flames
Author Jerald Walker
Publisher Beacon Press
Release Date 2017-08-31
Category
Total Pages 208
ISBN 9780807036082
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Presents a memoir of growing up with blind, African American parents, who were members of Herbert W. Armstrong's cult, the Worldwide Church of God, which believed that their members were divinely chosen and all others would soon perish in rivers of flame. The substantial membership was ruled by fear, intimidation, and threats. Anyone who dared leave would endure hardship for the remainder of this life and eternal suffering in the next, which would arrive in 1975, three years after the start of the Great Tribulation. With more than a hundred thousand members and more than $80 million (the equivalent of $265 million in today's highest) at its height, the failure of the prophecy to materialize led the then-elementary-aged author to question his faith and imagine the possibility of choosing a destiny of his own.

Title INCIDENTS IN THE LIFE OF A SLAVE GIRL
Author Harriet Jacobs
Publisher e-artnow
Release Date 2017-10-06
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 231
ISBN 9788027221400
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

"Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl" was one of the first books to address the struggle for freedom by female slaves; explore their struggles with sexual harassment and abuse; and their effort to protect their roles as women and mothers. After being overshadowed by the Civil War, the novel was rediscovered in the late 20th century and since then hasn't been out of print ever. It is one of the seminal books written on the theme of slavery from a woman's point of view and appreciated worldwide academically as well. Excerpt: "Reader be assured this narrative is no fiction. I am aware that some of my adventures may seem incredible; but they are, nevertheless, strictly true. I have not exaggerated the wrongs inflicted by Slavery; on the contrary, my descriptions fall far short of the facts. I have concealed the names of places, and given persons fictitious names. I had no motive for secrecy on my own account, but I deemed it kind and considerate towards others to pursue this course...." Harriet Jacobs (1813–1897) was an African-American writer who was formerly a fugitive slave. To save her family and her own identity from being found out, she used the pseudonym of Linda Brent and wrote secretly during the night.

Title The Philadelawareans and Other Essays Relating to Delaware
Author John Andrew Munroe
Publisher University of Delaware Press
Release Date 2004
Category History
Total Pages 305
ISBN 0874138728
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This volume presents a varied sampling of the author's writings from the past sixty years, along with some previously unpublished materials. It begins with a long prologue that the author calls a literary autobiography, and this story is continued and amplified in introductory notes that accompany each of the following items. the relationship between Delaware and the city of Philadelphia. This theme reappears in many guises in the background of other items as, for example, in a summary of New Castle's history, in an investigation of an experiment in nonresident representation in Congress, and in explanation of the unique importance of an early Wilmington collector of customs. In the last essay, previously unpublished, the relationship is personalized in a reminiscence contributing to the autobiographical theme with which the book began. at the University of Delaware.

Politics Of Memory by Ana Lucia Araujo

Title Politics of Memory
Author Ana Lucia Araujo
Publisher Routledge
Release Date 2013-05-07
Category History
Total Pages 308
ISBN 9781136313158
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The public memory of slavery and the Atlantic slave trade, which some years ago could be observed especially in North America, has slowly emerged into a transnational phenomenon now encompassing Europe, Africa, and Latin America, and even Asia – allowing the populations of African descent, organized groups, governments, non-governmental organizations and societies in these different regions to individually and collectively update and reconstruct the slave past. This edited volume examines the recent transnational emergence of the public memory of slavery, shedding light on the work of memory produced by groups of individuals who are descendants of slaves. The chapters in this book explore how the memory of the enslaved and slavers is shaped and displayed in the public space not only in the former slave societies but also in the regions that provided captives to the former American colonies and European metropoles. Through the analysis of exhibitions, museums, monuments, accounts, and public performances, the volume makes sense of the political stakes involved in the phenomenon of memorialization of slavery and the slave trade in the public sphere.

Once More To The Ghetto by Jerald Walker

Title Once More to the Ghetto
Author Jerald Walker
Publisher Unknown
Release Date 2019-06
Category
Total Pages 86
ISBN 1944853634
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Once More to the Ghetto and Other Essays is a collection of linked explorations of race, identity, family, and community. Combining spare, unflinching prose with a razor sharp wit, Walker takes on both individual and institutionalized forms of bias and racism, pulling no punches and sparing no one, including himself, in this exciting new collection from one of America's most acclaimed essayists.

Title The Arc of the Moral Universe and Other Essays
Author Joshua Cohen
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2010
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780674055605
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Joshua Cohen is one of the best political philosophers in America, as well as one of the best essay writers. He studied with John Rawls during the 1960s and since then, like his teacher, has dared to provide an ideal of democracy to be the guide for political thought rather than the minimalist account that many thinkers seem to believe is the best they can do. These essays, written over the past 20 years, are widely recognized by philosophers and political theorists as major and sometimes defining papers in their fields. The majority of them are essays on democracy and justice, or they discuss major ideas or figures (Locke, Rousseau, Rawls, Habermas) within the liberal and democratic traditions of social and political thought. However, many of these essays are published in obscure editions or journals and some have never been published at all, which makes them hard to find even for the most determined scholar. By gathering these seminal insights into one volume, Harvard Press is performing a valuable service to the community of philosophers and political theorists. Not only does The Arc of the Moral Universe and Other Essays showcase a brilliant theorist whose influence is only going to grow, it also continues the legacy of John Rawls at Harvard University Press.

The Water Dancer by Ta-Nehisi Coates

Title The Water Dancer
Author Ta-Nehisi Coates
Publisher One World
Release Date 2019-09-24
Category Fiction
Total Pages 416
ISBN 9780399590603
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • OPRAH’S BOOK CLUB PICK • From the National Book Award–winning author of Between the World and Me, a boldly conjured debut novel about a magical gift, a devastating loss, and an underground war for freedom. “This potent book about America’s most disgraceful sin establishes [Ta-Nehisi Coates] as a first-rate novelist.”—San Francisco Chronicle IN DEVELOPMENT AS A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE • Adapted by Ta-Nehisi Coates and Kamilah Forbes, produced by MGM, Plan B, and Oprah Winfrey’s Harpo Films NOMINATED FOR THE NAACP IMAGE AWARD • NAMED ONE OF PASTE’S BEST NOVELS OF THE DECADE • NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY Time • NPR • The Washington Post • Chicago Tribune • Vanity Fair • Esquire • Good Housekeeping • Paste • Town & Country • The New York Public Library • Kirkus Reviews • Library Journal Young Hiram Walker was born into bondage. When his mother was sold away, Hiram was robbed of all memory of her—but was gifted with a mysterious power. Years later, when Hiram almost drowns in a river, that same power saves his life. This brush with death births an urgency in Hiram and a daring scheme: to escape from the only home he’s ever known. So begins an unexpected journey that takes Hiram from the corrupt grandeur of Virginia’s proud plantations to desperate guerrilla cells in the wilderness, from the coffin of the Deep South to dangerously idealistic movements in the North. Even as he’s enlisted in the underground war between slavers and the enslaved, Hiram’s resolve to rescue the family he left behind endures. This is the dramatic story of an atrocity inflicted on generations of women, men, and children—the violent and capricious separation of families—and the war they waged to simply make lives with the people they loved. Written by one of today’s most exciting thinkers and writers, The Water Dancer is a propulsive, transcendent work that restores the humanity of those from whom everything was stolen. Praise for The Water Dancer “Ta-Nehisi Coates is the most important essayist in a generation and a writer who changed the national political conversation about race with his 2015 memoir, Between the World and Me. So naturally his debut novel comes with slightly unrealistic expectations—and then proceeds to exceed them. The Water Dancer . . . is a work of both staggering imagination and rich historical significance. . . . What’s most powerful is the way Coates enlists his notions of the fantastic, as well as his fluid prose, to probe a wound that never seems to heal. . . . Timeless and instantly canon-worthy.”—Rolling Stone

An Essay On Slavery And Abolitionism by Catherine E. Beecher

Title An Essay On Slavery and Abolitionism
Author Catherine E. Beecher
Publisher BoD – Books on Demand
Release Date 2020-07-30
Category Fiction
Total Pages 72
ISBN 9783752373752
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

Reproduction of the original: An Essay On Slavery and Abolitionism by Catherine E. Beecher

Black Tan by Douglas Wilson

Title Black Tan
Author Douglas Wilson
Publisher Canon Press & Book Service
Release Date 2005-01-01
Category History
Total Pages 122
ISBN 9781591280323
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

If we want to understand contemporary American culture wars, we must first come to grips with the culture wars of the nineteenth century. Many current social evils can be explained by our nation's failure to remove slavery in a biblical way. But who is qualified to talk about such things? What is a biblical view of racism? And why do the Christian answers to such questions so infuriate the radical left and the radical right? This collection of essays lays out some of the answers from a view unafraid of historic biblical orthodoxy.

Title Explaining Value and Other Essays in Moral Philosophy
Author Gilbert Harman
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2000
Category Philosophy
Total Pages 238
ISBN 0198238045
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

In this selection of Gilbert Harman's shorter writings in moral philosophy, the essays are divided into four sections, focusing on moral relativism, values and valuing, character traits and virtue ethics, and ways of explaining aspects of morality.

Title Incidents In the Life of a Slave Girl
Author Harriet Jacobs
Publisher Lulu.com
Release Date 2019-06
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 272
ISBN 9780359702138
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

The autobiography of Harriet Jacobs as told by herself. She details her life in slavery from a young girl until she becomes a free woman.

Afro Creole by Richard D. E. Burton

Title Afro Creole
Author Richard D. E. Burton
Publisher Cornell University Press
Release Date 2018-10-18
Category History
Total Pages 320
ISBN 9781501722431
Language English, Spanish, and French
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Book Summary:

This wide-ranging book explores the origins, development, and character of Afro-Caribbean cultures from the slave period to the present day. Richard D. E. Burton focuses on ways in which African traditions—including those in religion, music, food, dress, and family structure—were transformed by interaction with European and indigenous forces to create the particular cultures of Jamaica, Trinidad, and Haiti. He demonstrates how the resulting Afro-Creole cultures have both challenged and reinforced the social, political, and economic status quo in these countries. Jamaican slaves opposed slavery in many ways and one of the most important, Burton suggests, was the development of Afro-Christianity. He pays particular attention to the African-derived Christmas celebration of Jonkonnu as an expression of opposition and then documents religion in the post-slavery period, with an emphasis on Rastafarianism in Jamaica and Vodou in Haiti. The element of play has always figured importantly in Afro-Caribbean life. Burton examines the evolution of carnival and calypso in Trinidad and describes the significance of cricket in defining Caribbean national identity. Based on ten years of research, Afro-Creole draws on historical, anthropological, sociological, and literary sources. Burton characterizes the emergence of Caribbean identity with three different national flavors and demonstrates how culture both reflects and impacts people's changing sense of their own political power.

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