1774: The Long Year of Revolution

Download 1774: The Long Year of Revolution Ebook, Epub, Textbook, quickly and easily or read online 1774: The Long Year of Revolution full books anytime and anywhere. Click download or read online button and get unlimited access by create free account.

1774: The Long Year of Revolution
Title 1774: The Long Year of Revolution
Author
Publisher Knopf
Release DateFebruary 11, 2020
Category History
Total Pages February 11, 2020
ISBN B07RL521HN
Book Rating 4.4 out of 5 from 94 reviews
Language EN, ES, BE, DA ,DE , NL and FR
Book Review & Summary:

From one of our most acclaimed and original colonial historians, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, 2018 president of the American Historical Association, a groundbreaking book--the first to look at the critical "long year" of 1774 and the revolutionary change that took place from December 1773 to mid-April 1775, from the Boston Tea Party and the first Continental Congress to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. This masterly work of historical writing, Mary Beth Norton's first in almost a decade, looks at the sixteen months during which the traditional loyalists to King George III began their discordant "discussions" that led to their acceptance of the inevitability of war against the British Empire and to the clashes at Lexington and Concord in mid-April 1775. Drawing extensively on pamphlets, newspapers, and personal correspondence, Norton reconstructs colonial political discourse as it happened, showing the vigorous campaign mounted by conservatives criticizing congressional actions. But by then it was too late. In early 1775, governors throughout the colonies informed colonial officials in London that they were unable to thwart the increasing power of the committees and their allied provincial congresses. Although the Declaration of Independence would not be formally adopted until July 1776, Americans, even before the outbreak of war in April 1775, had in effect "declared independence" by obeying the decrees of their new provincial governments rather than colonial officials. The much-anticipated new book by one of America's most dazzling historians--the culmination of more than four decades of Norton's research and thought.

Similar books related to " 1774: The Long Year of Revolution " from our database.

1774 by Mary Beth Norton

Title 1774
Author Mary Beth Norton
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2021-02-09
Category
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9780804172462
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

From one of our most acclaimed and original colonial historians, a groundbreaking book--the first to look at the critical "long year" of 1774 and the revolutionary change that took place from December 1773 to mid-April 1775, from the Boston Tea Party and the First Continental Congress to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. A WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF 2020 Mary Beth Norton keenly focuses on the sixteen months during which the traditional loyalists to King George III began their discordant "discussions" that led to their acceptance of the inevitability of war against the British Empire and to the clashes at Lexington and Concord in mid-April 1775. Drawing extensively on pamphlets, newspapers, and personal correspondence, Norton reconstructs colonial political discourse as it happened, showing the vigorous campaign mounted by conservatives criticizing congressional actions. But by then it was too late. In early 1775, governors throughout the colonies informed colonial officials in London that they were unable to thwart the increasing power of the committees and their allied provincial congresses. Although the Declaration of Independence would not be formally adopted until July 1776, Americans, even before the outbreak of war in April 1775, had in effect "declared independence" by obeying the decrees of their new provincial governments rather than colonial officials.

1774 by Mary Beth Norton

Title 1774
Author Mary Beth Norton
Publisher Knopf
Release Date 2020
Category HISTORY
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9780385353366
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

In this original and important book, Mary Beth Norton's first in more than fifteen years, she looks at the sixteen months during which the traditional loyalists to King George III began their discordant 'discussions' that led to their acceptance of the inevitability of war against the British Empire and to the clashes at Lexington and Concord in mid-April, 1775. Drawing extensively on pamphlets, newspapers, and personal correspondence, Norton reconstructs colonial political discourse as it happened, showing the vigorous campaign mounted by conservatives criticizing congressional actions. But by then it was too late. In early 1775, governors throughout the colonies informed colonial officials in London that they were unable to thwart the increasing power of the committees and their allied provincial congresses. Although the Declaration of Independence would not be formally adopted until July 1776, Americans, even before the outbreak of war in April 1775, had in effect "declared independence" by obeying the decrees of their new provincial governments rather than colonial officials.

1774 by Mary Beth Norton

Title 1774
Author Mary Beth Norton
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2020-02-11
Category History
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9780385353373
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

From one of our most acclaimed and original colonial historians, a groundbreaking book tracing the critical "long year" of 1774 and the revolutionary change that took place from the Boston Tea Party and the First Continental Congress to the Battles of Lexington and Concord. A WALL STREET JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF THE YEAR In this masterly work of history, the culmination of more than four decades of research and thought, Mary Beth Norton looks at the sixteen months leading up to the clashes at Lexington and Concord in mid-April 1775. This was the critical, and often overlooked, period when colonists traditionally loyal to King George III began their discordant “discussions” that led them to their acceptance of the inevitability of war against the British Empire. Drawing extensively on pamphlets, newspapers, and personal correspondence, Norton reconstructs colonial political discourse as it took place throughout 1774. Late in the year, conservatives mounted a vigorous campaign criticizing the First Continental Congress. But by then it was too late. In early 1775, colonial governors informed officials in London that they were unable to thwart the increasing power of local committees and their allied provincial congresses. Although the Declaration of Independence would not be formally adopted until July 1776, Americans had in effect “declared independence ” even before the outbreak of war in April 1775 by obeying the decrees of the provincial governments they had elected rather than colonial officials appointed by the king. Norton captures the tension and drama of this pivotal year and foundational moment in American history and brings it to life as no other historian has done before.

1775 by Kevin Phillips

Title 1775
Author Kevin Phillips
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2013-09-24
Category History
Total Pages 628
ISBN 9780143123996
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

An unconventional assessment of the American Revolution examines the events, politics, economic factors, and military preparations of 1775 that ignited the war and established patriot control over American governance and key territories.

Founding Mothers Fathers by Mary Beth Norton

Title Founding Mothers Fathers
Author Mary Beth Norton
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2011-08-03
Category History
Total Pages 512
ISBN 9780307760760
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

Much like A Midwife's Tale and The Unredeemed Captive, this novel is about power relationships in early American society, religion, and politics--with insights into the initial development and operation of government, the maintenance of social order, and the experiences of individual men and women.

Title Igniting the American Revolution
Author Derek W. Beck
Publisher Sourcebooks, Inc.
Release Date 2015-10-06
Category History
Total Pages 480
ISBN 9781492613961
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

"For those who like their history rich in vivid details, Derek Beck has served up a delicious brew in this book....This may soon become everyone's favorite." —Thomas Fleming, author of Liberty! The American Revolution A sweeping, provocative new look at the pivotal years leading up to the American Revolution The Revolutionary War did not begin with the Declaration of Independence, but several years earlier in 1773. In this gripping history, Derek W. Beck reveals the full story of the war before American independence-from both sides. Spanning the years 1773-1775 and drawing on new material from meticulous research and previously unpublished documents, letters, and diaries, Igniting the American Revolution sweeps readers from the rumblings that led to the Boston Tea Party to the halls of Parliament-where Ben Franklin was almost run out of England for pleading on behalf of the colonies-to that fateful Expedition to Concord which resulted in the shot heard round the world. With exquisite detail and keen insight, Beck brings revolutionary America to life in all its enthusiastic and fiery patriotic fervor, painting a nuanced portrait of the perspectives, ambitions, people, and events on both the British and the American sides that eventually would lead to the convention in Philadelphia on July 4, 1776. Captivating, provocative and inspiring, Igniting the American Revolution is the definitive history of these landmark years in our nation's history, whose events irrevocably altered the future not only of the United States and England, but the whole world. " Integrating compelling personalities with grand strategies, political maneuverings on both sides of the Atlantic, and vividly related incidents, Igniting the American Revolution pulls the reader into a world rending the British Empire asunder." Samuel A. Forman, author of the biography Dr. Joseph Warren

Title American Revolutions A Continental History 1750 1804
Author Alan Taylor
Publisher W. W. Norton & Company
Release Date 2016-09-06
Category History
Total Pages 736
ISBN 9780393253870
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

“Excellent . . . deserves high praise. Mr. Taylor conveys this sprawling continental history with economy, clarity, and vividness.”—Brendan Simms, Wall Street Journal The American Revolution is often portrayed as a high-minded, orderly event whose capstone, the Constitution, provided the nation its democratic framework. Alan Taylor, a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner, gives us a different creation story in this magisterial history. The American Revolution builds like a ground fire overspreading Britain’s colonies, fueled by local conditions and resistant to control. Emerging from the continental rivalries of European empires and their native allies, the revolution pivoted on western expansion as well as seaboard resistance to British taxes. When war erupted, Patriot crowds harassed Loyalists and nonpartisans into compliance with their cause. The war exploded in set battles like Saratoga and Yorktown and spread through continuing frontier violence. The discord smoldering within the fragile new nation called forth a movement to concentrate power through a Federal Constitution. Assuming the mantle of “We the People,” the advocates of national power ratified the new frame of government. But it was Jefferson’s expansive “empire of liberty” that carried the revolution forward, propelling white settlement and slavery west, preparing the ground for a new conflagration.

Title The Howe Brothers and the American Revolution
Author Ira D. Gruber
Publisher UNC Press Books
Release Date 2014-01-01
Category Biography & Autobiography
Total Pages 411
ISBN 9780807838884
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

By focusing on the Howe brothers, their political connections, their relationships with the British ministry, their attitude toward the Revolution, and their military activities in America, Gruber answers the frequently asked question of why the British failed to end the American Revolution in its early years. This book supersedes earlier studies because of its broader research and because it elucidates the complex personal interplay between Whitehall and its commanders. Originally published in 1974. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Separated By Their Sex by Mary Beth Norton

Title Separated by Their Sex
Author Mary Beth Norton
Publisher Cornell University Press
Release Date 2011-05-16
Category History
Total Pages 272
ISBN 0801461375
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

In Separated by Their Sex, Mary Beth Norton offers a bold genealogy that shows how gender came to determine the right of access to the Anglo-American public sphere by the middle of the eighteenth century. Earlier, high-status men and women alike had been recognized as appropriate political actors, as exemplified during and after Bacon’s Rebellion by the actions of—and reactions to—Lady Frances Berkeley, wife of Virginia’s governor. By contrast, when the first ordinary English women to claim a political voice directed group petitions to Parliament during the Civil War of the 1640s, men relentlessly criticized and parodied their efforts. Even so, as late as 1690, Anglo-American women’s political interests and opinions were publicly acknowledged. Norton traces the profound shift in attitudes toward women’s participation in public affairs to the age’s cultural arbiters, including John Dunton, editor of the Athenian Mercury, a popular 1690s periodical that promoted women’s links to husband, family, and household. Fittingly, Dunton was the first author known to apply the word "private" to women and their domestic lives. Subsequently, the immensely influential authors Richard Steele and Joseph Addison (in the Tatler and the Spectator) advanced the notion that women’s participation in politics—even in political dialogues—was absurd. They and many imitators on both sides of the Atlantic argued that women should confine themselves to home and family, a position that American women themselves had adopted by the 1760s. Colonial women incorporated the novel ideas into their self-conceptions; during such "private" activities as sitting around a table drinking tea, they worked to define their own lives. On the cusp of the American Revolution, Norton concludes, a newly gendered public-private division was firmly in place.

Title The American Revolution
Author DK
Publisher Penguin
Release Date 2016-04-05
Category History
Total Pages 400
ISBN 9781465455017
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

Uncover the remarkable story of the American Revolution! Who were the Redcoats, and what was the Boston Tea Party? Explore key events like the British surrender at Yorktown, and the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Written in association with the esteemed Smithsonian Institution, this beautiful visual reference ebook will transport you back in time and onto the front lines of the American Revolution. Take chronological steps through the American Revolution, starting with the first stirrings of colonial resistance. Learn about important events and key moments of the war that gave birth to the American republic. Meet the most memorable people from the period, from George Washington to Benedict Arnold, and explore first-person accounts by soldiers and civilians. This history ebook for children grade 7 and up gives you a complete overview of the most fascinating events during the war. The action is brought to life through illustrated accounts of every major military action and comprehensive timelines for every stage of the conflict. Gallery spreads feature the weapons, arms, and uniforms that were used, to give you a full picture of what it was like. Large color pictures, black-and-white drawings, and detailed maps add intriguing visuals to the history of America, so reading can be engaging and enjoyable. This visual reference ebook also details the politics of the war and the different parts of society impacted by the events. Learn about the treatment of prisoners and the revolution's implications for women, Native Americans, and African-Americans. Dive in and explore the parts of the American Revolution you haven't yet discovered. Mapping the Road to American Independence The American Revolution is the most significant event in American history. Without it, there would not be the United States of America. More than 240 years after the signing of the Declaration of Independence, this educational ebook demonstrates why this historical period is still so important today. Journey through the most significant events and battles: - From Resistance to Rebellion - Before 1775 - The Start of the War - 1775 - Birth of a Nation - 1776 - The Struggle for Mastery - 1777 - A Widening War - 1778 - Conflict Spreads - 1779 - The Continuing Struggle - 1780 - America Victorious - 1781-83 - Aftermath: A Stronger Nation

Liberty S Exiles by Maya Jasanoff

Title Liberty s Exiles
Author Maya Jasanoff
Publisher Vintage
Release Date 2012
Category History
Total Pages 480
ISBN 9781400075478
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

A global history of the post-Revolutionary War exodus of 60,000 Americans loyal to the British Empire to such regions as Canada, India and Sierra Leone traces the experiences of specific individuals while challenging popular conceptions about the founding of the United States. Reprint.

Title The First American Revolution
Author Ray Raphael
Publisher The New Press
Release Date 2010-03-16
Category History
Total Pages 146
ISBN 9781595587343
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

The original rebels: “Brings into clear focus events and identities of ordinary people who should share the historic limelight with the Founding Fathers.” —Publishers Weekly According to the traditional telling, the American Revolution began with “the shot heard ’round the world.” But the people started taking action earlier than many think. The First American Revolution uses the wide-angle lens of a people’s historian to tell a surprising new story of America’s revolutionary struggle. In the years before the battle of Lexington and Concord, local people—men and women of common means but of uncommon courage—overturned British authority and declared themselves free from colonial oppression, with acts of rebellion that long predated the Boston Tea Party. In rural towns such as Worcester, Massachusetts, democracy set down roots well before the Boston patriots made their moves in the fight for independence. Richly documented, The First American Revolution recaptures in vivid detail the grassroots activism that drove events in the years leading up to the break from Britain.

The Will Of The People by T. H. Breen

Title The Will of the People
Author T. H. Breen
Publisher Harvard University Press
Release Date 2019-09-17
Category History
Total Pages 240
ISBN 9780674242067
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

T. H. Breen introduces us to the ordinary men and women who took responsibility for the course of the American revolution. Far from the actions of the Continental Congress and the Continental Army, they took the reins of power and preserved a political culture based on the rule of law, creating America’s political identity in the process.

The Citizenship Revolution by Douglas Bradburn

Title The Citizenship Revolution
Author Douglas Bradburn
Publisher University of Virginia Press
Release Date 2009-07-13
Category History
Total Pages 432
ISBN 9780813930312
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

Most Americans believe that the ratification of the Constitution in 1788 marked the settlement of post-Revolutionary disputes over the meanings of rights, democracy, and sovereignty in the new nation. In The Citizenship Revolution, Douglas Bradburn undercuts this view by showing that the Union, not the Nation, was the most important product of independence. In 1774, everyone in British North America was a subject of King George and Parliament. In 1776 a number of newly independent "states," composed of "American citizens" began cobbling together a Union to fight their former fellow countrymen. But who was an American? What did it mean to be a "citizen" and not a "subject"? And why did it matter? Bradburn’s stunning reinterpretation requires us to rethink the traditional chronologies and stories of the American Revolutionary experience. He places battles over the meaning of "citizenship" in law and in politics at the center of the narrative. He shows that the new political community ultimately discovered that it was not really a "Nation," but a "Union of States"—and that it was the states that set the boundaries of belonging and the very character of rights, for citizens and everyone else. To those inclined to believe that the ratification of the Constitution assured the importance of national authority and law in the lives of American people, the emphasis on the significance and power of the states as the arbiter of American rights and the character of nationhood may seem strange. But, as Bradburn argues, state control of the ultimate meaning of American citizenship represented the first stable outcome of the crisis of authority, allegiance, and identity that had exploded in the American Revolution—a political settlement delicately reached in the first years of the nineteenth century. So ended the first great phase of the American citizenship revolution: a continuing struggle to reconcile the promise of revolutionary equality with the pressing and sometimes competing demands of law, order, and the pursuit of happiness.

Clothed In Robes Of Sovereignty by Benjamin H. Irvin

Title Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty
Author Benjamin H. Irvin
Publisher Oxford University Press
Release Date 2014-02-12
Category History
Total Pages 392
ISBN 9780199314591
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

In 1776, when the Continental Congress declared independence, formally severing relations with Great Britain, it immediately began to fashion new objects and ceremonies of state with which to proclaim the sovereignty of the infant republic. In this marvelous social and cultural history of the Continental Congress, Benjamin H. Irvin describes this struggle to create a national identity during the American Revolution. The book examines the material artifacts, rituals, and festivities by which Congress endeavored not only to assert its political legitimacy and to bolster the war effort, but ultimately to exalt the United States and to win the allegiance of its inhabitants. Congress, for example, crafted an emblematic great seal, celebrated anniversaries of U.S. independence, and implemented august diplomatic protocols for the reception of foreign ministers. Yet as Irvin demonstrates, Congress could not impose its creations upon a passive American public. To the contrary, "the people out of doors"-broadly defined to include not only the working poor who rallied in the streets of Philadelphia, but all persons unrepresented in the Continental Congress, including women, loyalists, and Native Americans-vigorously contested Congress's trappings of nationhood. Vividly narrating the progress of the Revolution in Philadelphia and the lived experiences of its inhabitants during the tumultuous war, Clothed in Robes of Sovereignty sharpens our understanding of the relationship between political elites and crowds of workaday protestors as it illuminates the ways in which ideologies of gender, class, and race shaped the civic identity of the Revolutionary United States.

Title The Articles of Confederation
Author Merrill Jensen
Publisher Univ of Wisconsin Press
Release Date 1940
Category Constitutional history
Total Pages 284
ISBN 0299002047
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

Title The Revolutionary War Lives and Letters of Lucy and Henry Knox
Author Henry Knox
Publisher JHU Press
Release Date 2017-10-27
Category History
Total Pages 205
ISBN 9781421423456
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

In 1774, Boston bookseller Henry Knox married Lucy Waldo Flucker, the daughter of a prominent Tory family. Although Lucy's father was the third-ranking colonial official in Massachusetts, the couple fled British-occupied Boston after the Battles of Lexington and Concord. Knox served in the Continental Army as Washington's artillery commander until the war's end. Like John and Abigail Adams, the Knoxes were often separated during the war and spent much of their time writing to one another. They penned nearly 200 letters, more than half of which are annotated for this volume. This correspondence--which spans the entire war--provides a remarkable window into the couple's marriage. Struggling to cope with a momentous conflict and attempting to preserve their family, the Knoxes negotiated shifts in gender and power relations through their personal and intimate letters. Working together, Henry and Lucy maintained their household and protected their property, raised and educated their children, and adjusted to other dramatic changes within their family, including a total break between Lucy and her Tory relatives. -- Back cover.

Title American Insurgents American Patriots
Author T. H. Breen
Publisher Hill and Wang
Release Date 2010-05-11
Category History
Total Pages 352
ISBN 1429932600
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

Before there could be a revolution, there was a rebellion; before patriots, there were insurgents. Challenging and displacing decades of received wisdom, T. H. Breen's strikingly original book explains how ordinary Americans—most of them members of farm families living in small communities—were drawn into a successful insurgency against imperial authority. This is the compelling story of our national political origins that most Americans do not know. It is a story of rumor, charity, vengeance, and restraint. American Insurgents, American Patriots reminds us that revolutions are violent events. They provoke passion and rage, a willingness to use violence to achieve political ends, a deep sense of betrayal, and a strong religious conviction that God expects an oppressed people to defend their rights. The American Revolution was no exception. A few celebrated figures in the Continental Congress do not make for a revolution. It requires tens of thousands of ordinary men and women willing to sacrifice, kill, and be killed. Breen not only gives the history of these ordinary Americans but, drawing upon a wealth of rarely seen documents, restores their primacy to American independence. Mobilizing two years before the Declaration of Independence, American insurgents in all thirteen colonies concluded that resistance to British oppression required organized violence against the state. They channeled popular rage through elected committees of safety and observation, which before 1776 were the heart of American resistance. American Insurgents, American Patriots is the stunning account of their insurgency, without which there would have been no independent republic as we know it.

Title Our Lives Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor
Author Richard R. Beeman
Publisher Basic Books
Release Date 2013-05-07
Category History
Total Pages 528
ISBN 9780465037827
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

In 1768, Philadelphia physician Benjamin Rush stood before the empty throne of King George III, overcome with emotion as he gazed at the symbol of America's connection with England. Eight years later, he became one of the fifty-six men to sign the Declaration of Independence, severing America forever from its mother country. Rush was not alone in his radical decision -- many of those casting their votes in favor of independence did so with a combination of fear, reluctance, and even sadness. In Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor, acclaimed historian Richard R. Beeman examines the grueling twenty-two-month period between the meeting of the Continental Congress on September 5, 1774 and the audacious decision for independence in July of 1776. As late as 1774, American independence was hardly inevitable -- indeed, most Americans found it neither desirable nor likely. When delegates from the thirteen colonies gathered in September, they were, in the words of John Adams, "a gathering of strangers." Yet over the next two years, military, political, and diplomatic events catalyzed a change of unprecedented magnitude: the colonists' rejection of their British identities in favor of American ones. In arresting detail, Beeman brings to life a cast of characters, including the relentless and passionate John Adams, Adams' much-misunderstood foil John Dickinson, the fiery political activist Samuel Adams, and the relative political neophyte Thomas Jefferson, and with profound insight reveals their path from subjects of England to citizens of a new nation. A vibrant narrative, Our Lives, Our Fortunes and Our Sacred Honor tells the remarkable story of how the delegates to the Continental Congress, through courage and compromise, came to dedicate themselves to the forging of American independence.

Title The Howe Dynasty The Untold Story of a Military Family and the Women Behind Britain s Wars for America
Author Julie Flavell
Publisher Liveright Publishing
Release Date 2021-07-20
Category History
Total Pages 480
ISBN 9781631490620
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

Finally revealing the family’s indefatigable women among its legendary military figures, The Howe Dynasty recasts the British side of the American Revolution. In December 1774, Benjamin Franklin met Caroline Howe, the sister of British General Sir William Howe and Richard Admiral Lord Howe, in a London drawing room for “half a dozen Games of Chess.” But as historian Julie Flavell reveals, these meetings were about much more than board games: they were cover for a last-ditch attempt to forestall the outbreak of the American War of Independence. Aware that the distinguished Howe family, both the men and the women, have been known solely for the military exploits of the brothers, Flavell investigated the letters of Caroline Howe, which have been blatantly overlooked since the nineteenth century. Using revelatory documents and this correspondence, The Howe Dynasty provides a groundbreaking reinterpretation of one of England’s most famous military families across four wars. Contemporaries considered the Howes impenetrable and intensely private—or, as Horace Walpole called them, “brave and silent.” Flavell traces their roots to modest beginnings at Langar Hall in rural Nottinghamshire and highlights the Georgian phenomenon of the politically involved aristocratic woman. In fact, the early careers of the brothers—George, Richard, and William—can be credited not to the maneuverings of their father, Scrope Lord Howe, but to those of their aunt, the savvy Mary Herbert Countess Pembroke. When eldest sister Caroline came of age during the reign of King George III, she too used her intimacy with the royal inner circle to promote her brothers, moving smoothly between a straitlaced court and an increasingly scandalous London high life. With genuine suspense, Flavell skillfully recounts the most notable episodes of the brothers’ military campaigns: how Richard, commanding the HMS Dunkirk in 1755, fired the first shot signaling the beginning of the Seven Years’ War at sea; how George won the devotion of the American fighters he commanded at Fort Ticonderoga just three years later; and how youngest brother General William Howe, his sympathies torn, nonetheless commanded his troops to a bitter Pyrrhic victory in the Battle of Bunker Hill, only to be vilified for his failure as British commander-in-chief to subdue Washington’s Continental Army. Britain’s desperate battles to guard its most vaunted colonial possession are here told in tandem with London parlor-room intrigues, where Caroline bravely fought to protect the Howe reputation in a gossipy aristocratic milieu. A riveting narrative and long overdue reassessment of the entire family, The Howe Dynasty forces us to reimagine the Revolutionary War in ways that would have been previously inconceivable.

American Spring by Walter R. Borneman

Title American Spring
Author Walter R. Borneman
Publisher Little, Brown
Release Date 2014-05-06
Category History
Total Pages 480
ISBN 9780316221016
Language English, Spanish, and French
GET BOOK
Book Summary:

A vibrant new look at the American Revolution's first months, from the author of the bestseller The Admirals When we reflect on our nation's history, the American Revolution can feel almost like a foregone conclusion. In reality, the first weeks and months of 1775 were very tenuous, and a fractured and ragtag group of colonial militias had to coalesce rapidly to have even the slimmest chance of toppling the mighty British Army. AMERICAN SPRING follows a fledgling nation from Paul Revere's little-known ride of December 1774 and the first shots fired on Lexington Green through the catastrophic Battle of Bunker Hill, culminating with a Virginian named George Washington taking command of colonial forces on July 3, 1775. Focusing on the colorful heroes John Hancock, Samuel Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Benjamin Franklin, and Patrick Henry, and the ordinary Americans caught up in the revolution, Walter R. Borneman uses newly available sources and research to tell the story of how a decade of discontent erupted into an armed rebellion that forged our nation.

LEAVE A COMMENT